Main definitions of haze in US English:

: haze1haze2

haze1

noun

  • 1A slight obscuration of the lower atmosphere, typically caused by fine suspended particles.

    • ‘Atmospheric haze makes each layer of progressively distant peaks appear lighter in tone and color.’
    • ‘Through the slight early morning haze, I could make out taller buildings to the left.’
    • ‘Conditions were perfect - dry, bright and with just enough haze to give the countryside an atmospheric glow.’
    • ‘There will be some slight haze and some light, low cloud.’
    • ‘The haze is caused by high concentrations of small particles known as aerosols that are usually less than a few micrometers in diameter.’
    • ‘Darkness and haze can obscure the visual cues we need to maintain orientation.’
    • ‘One problem you will encounter at high altitudes is an excess of ultraviolet light, which results in atmospheric haze.’
    • ‘The entire valley was in a sea of thick haze, as it usually was in autumn or winter storms.’
    • ‘In winter high levels of haze are common.’
    • ‘A reading might indicate little or no cloud cover, but haze or fog may have been present.’
    • ‘A NASA study found some clouds that form on tiny haze particles are not cooling the Earth as much as previously thought.’
    • ‘After a few days of bad weather, the absence of haze was a welcome sight.’
    • ‘You may not get a view of the volcano's sulfuric craters because of cloud cover, fog, and haze.’
    • ‘Polarizers are most commonly used to darken blue skies in outdoor and scenic photographs by cutting through atmospheric haze.’
    • ‘The fog had lifted a little, and was being replaced with haze.’
    • ‘Dusk was setting in, and the horizon completely was obscured in haze.’
    • ‘The sky was clear below 20,000 feet, with haze limiting visibility to 5 miles.’
    • ‘These pictures were fuzzy because of the dense haze of the moon's atmosphere.’
    • ‘The aerosols and particles in the haze are affecting rainfall.’
    • ‘The many fine haze layers extend several hundred kilometers above the surface.’
    mist, fog, cloud, smog
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A tenuous cloud of something such as vapor or smoke in the air.
      ‘a faint haze of steam’
      • ‘This is only smoke haze, drifted down from the frightful bushfires burning elsewhere in Victoria.’
      • ‘This time I get to walk through a thick cloud of firework haze.’
      • ‘The air was clear; we could see the other side of the pub with no haze to obscure our view.’
      • ‘A thick, dusty haze settled over the glade in the wake of the blast.’
      • ‘The missiles sent a plume of darker smoke above the white haze of gunsmoke already hanging above the camp.’
      • ‘He said southerly winds were expected to clear the skies overnight, although problems with smoke haze may continue.’
      • ‘I return to the shrine and edge towards the Brahma statue, the sweet incense smoke creating a haze around it.’
      • ‘Smokestacks belched smoke into the air so that the sky was awash in a thick brown haze.’
      • ‘Day after day the landscape rolled by: three states covered in blankets of smoke and haze.’
      • ‘The thick haze of pollution is highly visible against the hills.’
      • ‘It is midnight, and we are sitting in a delicious yellow haze of tobacco smoke.’
      • ‘Through the rainy haze I saw the passenger point towards me.’
      • ‘A haze of smoke rose gently from a huddle of dwellings near a winding river.’
      • ‘There were several bottles on the table and an ashtray full of cigarettes creating a thick, smoky haze.’
      • ‘Inside, smoke wafted from cheap candles, polluting the room with a slight grey haze.’
      • ‘I can see nothing but people through the ribbony haze of rising cigarette smoke.’
      • ‘The haze of smoke from cars hangs heavily around the suburbs.’
      • ‘Steam rose all around her, and at once she was lost in a world of haze and mist.’
      • ‘Around 50 pool players competed in the weekly pool league, but the traditional haze of cigarette smoke hovering above the tables was missing.’
      • ‘At dusk, the sun sinks, blood red, through the haze of industrial smoke.’
  • 2in singular A state of mental obscurity or confusion.

    ‘through an alcoholic haze’
    • ‘Trapped within a haze of madness, I did not respond as he ordered me to my feet.’
    • ‘It was all an alcohol-induced haze at that stage.’
    • ‘He felt disconnected from his body, soaring into a haze of delirium.’
    • ‘The rest of the evening passed away in a haze of confusion.’
    • ‘Although he had been told not to drink, a man was found propped up against a tree in an alcoholic haze.’
    • ‘It spread through her head, like a thick, heavy haze that blocked out all reasoning and attempts at rational thought.’
    • ‘In a groggy haze, I descended the steep narrow staircase.’
    • ‘I'm bored out of my skull and I'm walking around in a bit of an oblivious haze.’
    • ‘Tired commuters pass you in a haze, or daze.’
    • ‘The alcoholic haze made everything so pretty and fantastic.’
    • ‘He spent the next dozen years making records and playing concerts in an alcoholic haze, drinking a bottle of brandy a day.’
    • ‘The alcoholic haze was starting to wear off a little and she could feel her temper rising.’
    • ‘I must not give in to this thick, warm haze in my mind.’
    • ‘The twenties ended in a confused haze of nostalgia and innovation.’
    • ‘Most of the time she walked around in a haze of confusion.’
    • ‘I have never passed out in a drunken haze on the dance floor of a trendy New York club.’
    • ‘How long she was enthralled in the mental haze that had come over her, she couldn't say.’
    • ‘The words penetrated the haze of confusion and shock that had momentarily frozen him in place.’
    • ‘A haze clouded her mind; she was sinking into deep water.’
    • ‘Addicts seek to escape the real world in a drug-induced haze.’
    blur, daze, confusion, vagueness, muddle, befuddlement
    View synonyms

Origin

Early 18th century (originally denoting fog or hoar frost): probably a back-formation from hazy.

Pronunciation

haze

/heɪz//hāz/

Main definitions of haze in US English:

: haze1haze2

haze2

verb

[with object]North American
  • 1Force (a new or potential recruit to the military, a college fraternity, etc.) to perform strenuous, humiliating, or dangerous tasks.

    ‘rookies were mercilessly hazed’
    • ‘True, just about every university in the world hazed its freshmen.’
    • ‘A Marine who doesn't quite measure up is hazed by two fellow Marines at the Corp's base in Cuba.’
    • ‘Unbeknownst to him, the mean frat boy jackasses are hazing him something fierce, for their own amusement.’
    • ‘They weren't hazing me, they were teaching me the rite of passage.’
    • ‘It is not an extracurricular activity to have fun and haze new employees.’
    • ‘Candidates are not harassed, hazed, or otherwise coerced into quitting at any time.’
    • ‘We get the feeling of belonging to the fraternity without needing to be hazed.’
    • ‘Maybe we should start sending over these guys who've hazed in fraternities.’
    • ‘It used to be that veterans hazed rookies by making them sing their school songs.’
  • 2Drive (cattle) while on horseback.

    ‘he hazed them on and they clambered up through the rocks’
    • ‘They sign onto the Interagency Bison Management Plan, which continues the hazing, testing, and slaughter of bison.’
    • ‘Montana has ramped up its annual plan of hazing, capturing and slaughtering bison that leave the boundaries of Yellowstone National Park.’
    • ‘He had little trouble hazing his quarry back.’

Origin

Late 17th century (originally Scots and dialect in the sense ‘frighten, scold, or beat’): perhaps related to obsolete French haser ‘tease or insult’.

Pronunciation

haze

/hāz//heɪz/