Definition of have the better of in US English:

have the better of

phrase

  • Be more successful in (a contest)

    ‘she usually had the better of these debates’
    • ‘In truth, they stalled as the second half spawned something of a role reversal and Lincoln had the better of what followed.’
    • ‘The home side were having the better of the dour exchanges and very nearly made it count on the stroke of half-time.’
    • ‘The 18-year-old defender, sent off when the sides met at Ibrox in November, scored just two minutes into a match that Aberdeen went on to have the better of.’
    • ‘The second game was a much closer contest with Grange having the better of the exchanges until midway through the second half when Kilbride rallied with some good scoring to force a draw.’
    • ‘The second half saw end to end intensive football, with Moone having the better of the early exchanges but unable to make the breakthrough.’
    • ‘Despite the visitors having the better of the possession it was Limerick that should really have taken the lead five minutes before the break.’
    • ‘After having the better of two hard-fought draws he won game three to take the overnight lead.’
    • ‘Both teams created good goal scoring chances with the visitors having the better of the exchanges.’
    • ‘Both sides missed opportunities in the first half with Harps having the better of the exchanges.’
    • ‘The game began at a pedestrian pace with Scotland having the better of the opening exchanges, but, by midway through the half, the Japanese turned up the intensity and took control.’
    • ‘The unbeaten hosts enjoyed a 22-15 victory after having the better of the first half, and then holding off Pock's second-half surge.’
    • ‘Despite having the better of the play throughout the game, East Fife could not find the kind of deft of touch they desperately needed to put the ball in the back of the net.’
    • ‘With the advantage of the strong wind in the second half, Storm were having the better of the game and looked set to run away with it after scoring straight after the break.’
    • ‘It was a reasonably good game with Ridge having the better of the exchanges for most of the game, with Villa been forced to use a mixture of very young and veteran players.’
    • ‘Most of the play was cantered in the midfield section, perhaps with the Carlow League side having the better of the possession.’
    • ‘Now with the chance to have some time out of the spotlight, and with most of the internal dissent gone, they seem to be having the better of it.’
    • ‘There was little to be seen in the line of constructive football, and for the home fans, there was a worrying aspect in that Drogheda appeared to be having the better of it.’
    • ‘United arguably had the better of what play there was in an anodyne first half-hour.’
    • ‘This was not a great performance by the Villa side, particularly in the first half with possibly Ardattin having the better of the exchanges.’
    • ‘Fisichella has had the better of all his team-mates, but inexplicably continues to be over-looked by the big teams.’