Definition of have a bone to pick with someone in US English:

have a bone to pick with someone

phrase

informal
  • Have reason to disagree or be annoyed with someone.

    • ‘I don't have any complaints on the movie, but I do have a bone to pick with the film studio.’
    • ‘I had a bone to pick with him during his comments, because he seemed to imply that a golf course was something great for the environment.’
    • ‘‘You know, I actually have a bone to pick with you about that,’ she said between bites.’
    • ‘It's not like she's had a bone to pick with her lately.’
    • ‘‘I have a bone to pick with you,’ I suddenly remembered, hitting him in the chest lightly, and totally ignoring his request.’
    • ‘The other passenger in the car, Lenny, has a bone to pick with Vince, because the latter got his daughter pregnant years before.’
    • ‘Perhaps I have always had a bone to pick with her because I believe that she stole my thunder.’
    • ‘Just make the horse move so much or else somebody is gonna have a bone to pick with you,’ I said.’
    • ‘Someone could have a bone to pick with you soon, and they'll lay it on thick as sauce.’
    • ‘And he said he's all ready for the interview, and I said to him, I have a bone to pick with you first.’
    • ‘I remembered something, ‘Drew, I have a bone to pick with you.’’
    • ‘He could be gruff and if he had a bone to pick with you, he picked it.’
    • ‘Father came into the kitchen, looking like he had a bone to pick with me, then skidded to a halt.’
    • ‘I don't have a bone to pick with them and vice versa.’
    • ‘What I'm getting at is that you seem have a bone to pick with me of late, and we should thrash it out before it becomes a problem.’
    • ‘Don Pedro tells Benedick that Beatrice has a bone to pick with him.’
    • ‘She didn't even have anything against those other guys, but she did have a bone to pick with Heero Yuy.’
    • ‘Looking at his father, Daniel recalled that he had a bone to pick with him.’