Definition of harvest in English:

harvest

noun

  • 1The process or period of gathering in crops.

    ‘helping with the harvest’
    • ‘Most Nicaraguans who have work still toil as migrants, following crops and working only during the harvest period.’
    • ‘Then it might really own the asparagus business for the harvest season, and farmers could stay in business.’
    • ‘By the end of the harvest period this month the plants are trimmed, healthy and have been nourished, yielding much better quality tea.’
    • ‘Strict and complex regulations control all aspects of the harvest and production.’
    • ‘Inundation was the sowing period, coming-forth was the growing period, and summer was the harvest period.’
    • ‘Alternative solutions are derived by first allowing extra labor hours during the harvest period.’
    • ‘Slowly we are chugging through the harvest and soon the 2002 crop will be all safely stowed away in the grain bins.’
    • ‘It's the end of the harvest season and these farmers in the village of Saloum are sorting the last of their peanuts.’
    • ‘Gulfprince ripens from early to mid-May, extending the harvest period.’
    • ‘‘An average of 60 tons of watermelon is produced each harvest,’ Suwandi said.’
    • ‘For most farmers, drying the crop is the major bottleneck in the harvest process.’
    • ‘Mubuyu farms will employ over 1,500 coffee pluckers during the harvest period between April and September of which the majority will be women.’
    • ‘A decline in sucrose concentration occurred across the harvest period, which may have been associated with a decline in solar radiation during the season.’
    • ‘The olive harvest falls after grape harvest, during a period of time when he'd otherwise have nothing for his workers to do.’
    • ‘The most appropriate time to tell myths is during a particular phase of the year - the period of the yam harvest from April to May.’
    • ‘Farmers present offerings and gifts to the deities for a successful harvest season and pray for bumper crops in the next.’
    • ‘After harvest, the process of ripening hastens.’
    • ‘Check the required waiting period on the label with the interval before harvest on food crops you wish to treat.’
    gathering in of the crops, harvesting, harvest time, harvest home
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    1. 1.1 The season's yield or crop.
      ‘a poor harvest’
      • ‘Mr Kasukumya said he was, however, happy that people in his area continued to record bumper harvests in maize production.’
      • ‘The chief said his subjects who were renowned farmers in the whole district had a poor harvest for the past two years because of inadequate fertiliser supplies.’
      • ‘But she said she was expecting a good harvest from her maize crop some of which she hoped to sell and hopefully go to college.’
      • ‘The crisis has been warded off, WV believes, once farmers produce successful harvests two years in a row.’
      • ‘UN agencies say, however, the harvest yielded less than 900 000 tons.’
      • ‘Its less fertile fields hadn't produced much of a harvest, and they had been lucky surviving the winter intact.’
      • ‘If those working on it can work together, the seeds sown to date can yield a bountiful harvest.’
      • ‘The Cultivation Ceremony is also performed to help keep the different grains free from disease, producing a bountiful harvest.’
      • ‘Weeks of hot weather had produced a good harvest, but many watermills were becalmed by drought, so flour remained scarce.’
      • ‘Australian, American, and Chilean winemakers work in steady, hot climates that produce regular harvests and consistent wines.’
      • ‘This followed a shortage caused by a poor winter harvest and alleged wheat market manipulation resulted in excessive exports of grain.’
      • ‘The government estimates the new harvest will yield about 600000 tons of staple grains this year.’
      • ‘The South has run out of room for its herds again, becoming increasingly dependent upon the pasta and bread products provided by grain harvests.’
      • ‘Exports have been climbing, not least to Britain, and at the same time recent harvests have failed to produce the anticipated quantities.’
      • ‘That's about four acres under cultivation - enough to produce a total harvest last year of about 10,000 bundles.’
      • ‘The next fortnight will be crucial because prolonged rains are needed immediately to water crops and ensure that a harvest is produced in October.’
      • ‘Already signs are that there might be a bumper harvest this season but all this will be in vain if measures are not taken to prevent crops from going to waste.’
      • ‘For a farmer with fifty acres, poor harvests were an advantage, since they meant higher grain prices.’
      • ‘The maize fields were also expected to produce a good harvest, with enough maize for feed and export.’
      • ‘The restaurant, called the ‘Bench Bistro’ offers simple, yet innovative dishes that pay homage to the area's bountiful harvests and local producers.’
      yield, crop, vintage, year's growth
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    2. 1.2 A quantity of animals caught or killed for human use.
      ‘a limited harvest of wild mink’
      • ‘The industry currently harvests about 3.2 million animals per year, which are processed for their skins and meat.’
      • ‘According to one elder interviewed, ensuring the animal was fat was an important part of the harvest.’
      • ‘The biologist believed that the herd would soon be in trouble and that the animal harvest would have to be reduced.’
      • ‘Inshore catch rates peaked in 1993 with a total harvest of 420,000 kilograms during an 18-week fishery.’
      • ‘But human harvest of horseshoe crabs has reduced the egg surplus.’
      • ‘Humans continue to illegally harvest Pteronura brasiliensis for pelts.’
      • ‘If you're someone who protests the harvest of animals, think about what you're doing.’
      • ‘This function might improve cellular water retention under the stress incurred during the transport of animals for harvest.’
      • ‘Chile is one of the countries closest to toothfish territory and catches and exports a large share of the toothfish harvest.’
      • ‘The wild harvest - which begins on September 6 this year - is generally capped at around 35,000 animals.’
      • ‘The good news is that Nicaragua is now cracking down on this animal harvest.’
      • ‘In a wild population, this theory implies that the remaining animals after a harvest will increase their reproductive rate to compensate.’
      • ‘The eastern North Pacific stock of gray whales has been increasing in recent years despite known harvests and other human caused mortalities.’
      • ‘Wildlife experts like Henley and Habel are more concerned about harvests of wild fish like paddlefish than of trout, which is being grown in aquaculture facilities.’
      • ‘Sex ratios could differ between the historical and modern beluga harvests because the modern hunters' preference for larger animals tends to bias their selection towards males.’
      • ‘In the olden days on St Kilda and at several bleak rocky points east, tenacious hunters would dangle off perilous cliffs to catch their harvest.’
      • ‘Scotland's premier chef knows all about wild harvests, which is why he's thrilled that autumn is here again’
      • ‘Fishermen and their representative bodies have always been more than capable of policing themselves and restricting their harvest of wild fish.’
      • ‘The annual throng of whitebaiters converging on Lake Ferry has been subject to an unseasonal interruption to the harvest just as catches were beginning to grow.’
    3. 1.3 The product or result of an action.
      ‘in terms of science, Apollo yielded a meager harvest’
      • ‘The futile effort to ‘eradicate’ marijuana has produced a harvest of misery.’
      • ‘Inflation, shortages, and declining production were the harvest of five years of perestroika and glasnost.’
      • ‘Such a policy will inevitably produce a bumper harvest of both ‘normal’ and unanticipated ‘abnormal’ results.’
      • ‘The paradox is that a search for a unifying center fails, but it has produced a harvest of insights into the riches of the Bible.’
      • ‘Later on, however, it produces a harvest of righteousness and peace for those who have been trained by it.’
      • ‘Will the second half of the calendar which is about to begin produce a more lucrative harvest for Peugeot?’
      • ‘I suspect Dr. Colbert has reaped a healthy harvest from the sale of these best-selling books.’
      • ‘But Redhefer seems to be reaping a rich harvest from the public deception.’
      • ‘I am doubly sure, between Levy and Sylvia, something will be done to that effect, which could just produce a bumper harvest of votes for both, next year.’
      • ‘The US invented basketball, and are now reaping its harvest.’
      • ‘And he has been able to work out what is good, and what results in a harvest of votes at the other end.’
      • ‘Meanwhile, the US Navy was reaping a rich harvest from its years of wargaming.’
      • ‘And so, once again, the Democrats reaped the bitter harvest of their own pallor and incompetence.’
      • ‘Indian theatre has produced harvests in many languages.’
      • ‘Curiosity about fundamental biological mechanisms has yielded a rich harvest of useful knowledge.’
      • ‘Bankers are throwing money at him to reap bigger harvests.’
      • ‘They reaped a rich harvest in the middle third during the first half, but their opponents had the cushion of Gooch's moment of magic.’
      return, result, fruits
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1 Gather (a crop) as a harvest.

    ‘after harvesting, most of the crop is stored in large buildings’
    • ‘The pharma corn was harvested along with the soybeans and sent to a grain elevator in Aurora, Nebraska, where it was mixed in with 500,000 bushels.’
    • ‘Each year, 17 million pounds of moss is harvested for sale in florist and craft stores across the nation.’
    • ‘Each year woman, children and even competing small farmers are forced to harvest the crop on big collective farms.’
    • ‘Centuries ago when farmers planted and harvested their crops, they knew little about the science involved.’
    • ‘In the United Stares, some of the 2002 grape crop was not harvested because of low prices.’
    • ‘It looks like some beans are thinking about turning color; others - planted after peas were harvested - are just flowering now.’
    • ‘So many fields have changed colour, almost overnight due to the large numbers of farmers being able to harvest the silage crop in record time.’
    • ‘The machines in the foreground are harvesting beans while the ones in back are preparing the ground for corn planting.’
    • ‘By then, the trees have usually grown so tall that their uppermost fruit may be beyond the reach of the picking poles that workers use to harvest the crop.’
    • ‘Crops were harvested twice, roughly 10 days apart, and an average of the two harvests was taken.’
    • ‘The harvest crew had been paid to harvest crops that went unsold in rain swept farmers' markets.’
    • ‘These farmers, for instance, are harvesting onions.’
    • ‘Planted in November, the onions are harvested from April through mid-June.’
    • ‘The coffee beans in a shade-grown brand are harvested under a canopy of trees.’
    • ‘More than 3,50,000 hectares of land are harvested and nearly 3.5 million people will be engaged in full-time tobacco manufacture.’
    • ‘It cannot be long before the sweet corn is harvested.’
    • ‘The gardens are starting to look bare as the last of the root crops are harvested, and the still green cover crops are filling in the beds.’
    • ‘With one hand free, they harvested coconuts and emptied rubber-tree bowls.’
    • ‘The trees in commercial production are harvested with trunk or limb shakers that literally shake the nuts off the tree to be collected by various means.’
    • ‘On our farm, we needed drying bins for when the corn or soybeans were harvested wet.’
    gather in, gather, bring in, take in
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    1. 1.1 Catch or kill (animals) for human consumption or use.
      • ‘This South Wales operation uses hand-raking and sieving to harvest the molluscs.’
      • ‘My unprofessional opinion of these techniques of harvesting the eels is that it has made a dent in the eel population.’
      • ‘Here they reach 3 or 4kg and become the most sought-after of the Pacific salmon, actively harvested by both commercial and sports fisheries.’
      • ‘There are several hundred species of shark, but only a handful of these are harvested for food.’
      • ‘Nearly all of those sharks are harvested by Spanish fishing fleets, whose other traditional commercial fish species have declined.’
      • ‘Without this support relocated insects would soon be harvested, providing a very expensive meal for a few people.’
      • ‘This new decision replaces the 2001 Bird Protection Act, which set limits on when the birds can be harvested.’
      • ‘In this case the market demand exceeds the supply and some of the harvesters now travel 200 Km to harvest the bugs.’
      • ‘Walleye pollock, more than half of all Bering bottom fish, are harvested in the world's largest single species fishery.’
      • ‘Could we conceivably ever get to a stage where we would have to harvest and eat other humans to get by?’
      • ‘Shrimp, crab, and a variety of fish are harvested from the ocean.’
      • ‘The solution, even for Birgit and Jurgen who have spent half a lifetime with the animals, is to harvest them for their meat.’
      • ‘The Anishinabe nation depends on the land, eating and harvesting the animals and fish as they have for thousands of years.’
      • ‘The bulk of the domestic shrimp catch is harvested by trawlers in the Gulf of Mexico.’
      • ‘So the International Whaling Commission was formed in order to place limits on the number of whales which could be harvested each year.’
      • ‘I will even eat the strange species of fish which are being harvested in the southern hemisphere and offered as an alternative to our cod and haddock.’
      • ‘They have the right to harvest one whale every two years.’
      • ‘Two of the species to be harvested in larger quantities are considered endangered.’
      • ‘If you keep harvesting the wildlife turtles, you'll have not enough numbers.’
      • ‘Wormers must now record their daily haul, and they are required to harvest the worms on a rotational basis, leaving some beaches to lie fallow for a season.’
    2. 1.2 Remove (cells, tissue, or an organ) from a person or animal for transplantation or experimental purposes.
      • ‘Stem cells are harvested from bone marrow, umbilical cords, the brain and spinal cord and other tissues.’
      • ‘To harvest stem cells for medical use an embryo would need to reach a minimum of 64 cells.’
      • ‘Researchers funded by government money could not harvest any more stem cell lines from embryos, but they could use those cell lines that had already been made.’
      • ‘In one experiment scientists harvested a subpopulation of non-trophoblastic placental cells, grew them up, and seeded them on to a polymer scaffold.’
      • ‘Most organs for transplant are harvested from brain-dead cadavers, although a few come from living donors.’
      • ‘What's much safer is an autologous transplant where a person's own stem cells are harvested either from their blood or bone marrow.’
      • ‘The stem cells were harvested from the patient's own bone marrow and injected into the ventricle.’
      • ‘In gene therapy, orthopedic surgeons harvest cells from a patient, modify them and return them to a particular area of the body.’
      • ‘If you believe that allowing the diseases that can be cured by stem cells harvested from zygotes is the greater evil, then support research.’
      • ‘Stem cells usually are harvested after three to five days from a blastocyst - an early stage of development before implantation in the uterus.’
      • ‘Mycelial tissue was harvested, lyophilized, submerged in liquid nitrogen and ground into a powder.’
      • ‘Twenty-four hours after transfection, the cells were harvested and the plasmid DNA recovered.’
      • ‘She is particularly interested in learning how other labs increased their success rate harvesting stem cells from early embryos.’
      • ‘The cloned cells were harvested, expanded in culture, and transferred to three-dimensional molds.’
      • ‘As recently as last month, a Gallup poll found that most Americans opposed both cloning for reproductive purposes and research cloning performed to harvest stem cells from human embryos.’
      • ‘New alternatives, which are currently experimental, include harvesting stem cells from umbilical cord blood or placentas of new born babies.’
      • ‘However, the process is controversial because many stem cells are harvested from discarded embryos.’
      • ‘Stem cells would be harvested from the blastocyst and transformed into the desired tissues for transplant.’
      • ‘The mouse lymphoma cells were treated for 4 or 24 h and the cells were harvested for RNA isolation at the end of the treatment.’
      • ‘For some experiments, tissue was harvested from tissue-culture plants.’
    3. 1.3 Collect or obtain (a resource) for future use.
      ‘the research teams are leading the way in identifying new ways of harvesting the sun's energy’
      • ‘Green buildings can harvest energy from the sun with 20 % of their energy requirement coming from solar cells.’
      • ‘Plants and bacteria have been harvesting solar energy and converting it into chemical forms of energy through a process known as (I'm guessing you've heard of it) photosynthesis for, um, a really long time.’
      • ‘If ice does exist there, it could be harvested and used for drinking water or broken down into hydrogen and oxygen.’
      • ‘The resin harvested from the trees made eco-friendly turpentine, replacing imported petroleum-based products.’
      • ‘Natalie hires the three kids to harvest copper wire from telephone poles in clandestine raids.’
      • ‘The floating pads, created for a Princeton architecture school thesis, harvest the energy of waves.’
      • ‘Only a failure of public and private investment leaves the country (and the world) unable to harvest renewable energy efficiently.’
      • ‘Its soil contains raw materials that might be harvested and processed into rocket fuel or breathable air.’
      • ‘Another substance that potentially can be harvested from the Moon is oxygen.’
      • ‘The capsule held billions of charged atoms - a total haul no bigger than a few grains of salt - that were harvested from solar wind on five collecting disks during the 884-day, $260-million mission.’
      • ‘A government grant - that is, public money harvested from all of us - of more than £47m was given to economically deprived east Brighton three years ago, to "revitalise" the area.’
      • ‘There is an abundance of energy waiting to be harvested from oceans around the world.’
      • ‘This hydrogen could be harvested and used for propellants or combined with oxygen to make water.’
      • ‘That could make consumer-friendly computers running on harvested energy workable.’
      • ‘Environmentally friendly features of the armory include a water catchment system to harvest rainwater for use in art features and plumbing, onsite electrical generation through a natural-gas fired microturbine, and fuel cells, daylighting, and natural ventilation to reduce dependence on air conditioning.’
      • ‘Worldwide, 1.5 million kilograms of coral are harvested annually.’
      • ‘It is often assumed that the resource can be harvested up to a certain level without depleting it.’
      • ‘The power supply would be harvested by solar panels, housed on a lunar orbiting power station.’

Origin

Old English hærfest autumn of Germanic origin; related to Dutch herfst and German Herbst, from an Indo-European root shared by Latin carpere pluck and Greek karpos fruit.

Pronunciation:

harvest

/ˈhärvəst/