Definition of hare in English:

hare

noun

  • 1A fast-running, long-eared mammal that resembles a large rabbit, having long hind legs and occurring typically in grassland or open woodland.

    • ‘Deer, hares, rabbits, mice, rats, pigeons, crows and many insects have to be ‘controlled’ in order for these crops to thrive.’
    • ‘The family Leporidae consists of 11 genera and around 54 species, commonly known as hares and rabbits.’
    • ‘Moors and heaths would have supported populations of wild horses and cattle, hares, wild goats and smaller creatures like voles, snakes and lizards.’
    • ‘In a peak year for hares, the hares edged out the voles as a source of meat for both adult owls and their owlets.’
    • ‘Traditional methods of using beating and hunting dogs are also engaged to corner and hunt muntjacs, wild boars and blacknaped hares.’
    • ‘Animals such as deer, boar, hares and rabbits lived in woodland surrounding most villages.’
    • ‘Rabbits, hares, and a few other species make up the Lagomorpha.’
    • ‘The reserve is also home to mountain reedbucks, common duikers, hares, guinea fowl and butterflies.’
    • ‘Wildlife, particularly rabbits and hares, act as reservoirs of disease.’
    • ‘Rabbits and hares are a universal pest, particularly while vineyards are being established.’
    • ‘The recent Burns Report into hunting concluded that hunting with dogs ‘seriously compromised the welfare’ of foxes, deer, hares and mink.’
    • ‘Three species of hares are native to California, the snowshoe, black-tailed, and white-tailed.’
    • ‘European game animals include various deer, wild boar, hare, and rabbit.’
    • ‘He said: ‘I've noticed an increase in birds and a lot more hares since the grassland has been in place.’’
    • ‘All young broadleaf sites should be adequately fenced with rabbit wire to prevent damage from rabbits and hares.’
    • ‘Other causes of damage in young trees can be grazing by animals such as hare and rabbits and trespass by cattle or sheep.’
    • ‘As any schoolchild knows, hares don't live down burrows, rabbits do; hares live above ground at all times.’
    • ‘Most hunts say there are enough options open to them within the legislation to allow foxes, hares and deer to be legally chased by hounds, though guns may need to be used for the kill.’
    • ‘Woodpigeons are attacking what is left of the cabbage and sprout crops and damage by rabbits and hares has been reported to apple trees in the area.’
    • ‘We who hunted rabbits, hares, pigeons and pheasants as part of our wintry routine were certainly aware of the mad March hare days.’
    1. 1.1 A dummy hare propelled around the track in greyhound racing.
      • ‘The programme did, however, contain something rare and more thought-provoking - a clip from a greyhound race in which a dog caught the hare.’
      • ‘When Franklin decides on an objective, he pursues it with the mad resolve of a greyhound chasing a mechanical hare.’
      • ‘They are, essentially, a covered bike rack for dogs, designed to line them up and point them unarguably in the same direction ready for the key moment when the hare goes by.’
      • ‘The Legend of the Mick the Miller is both touching and funny, yet Michael Tanner's tale of the greatest greyhound ever to chase a mechanical hare is ultimately flawed.’
      • ‘And let's face it, you don't hear people at the greyhound track complaining that the hare's not real, do you?’

verb

British
  • no object , with adverbial of direction Run with great speed.

    ‘he hared off between the trees’
    • ‘We'd been there for about a week, sat outside our teepee smoking weed, when suddenly there was this huge commotion at the stockade, and this motorbike comes haring down towards the lake.’
    • ‘Then Harry came haring out of the bathroom like some over-protective mother bear and just about bit my head off.’
    • ‘He hared off down Cirencester Way, going the wrong way up the road and weaving in and out of traffic.’
    • ‘Mutu leaves Toure for dead, hares down the left wing and shoots from a narrow angle.’
    • ‘Surely it's worth stepping off at Tours, taking in a Loire chateau or two, before haring down to the Atlantic.’
    • ‘The hillock did, indeed, provide a good vantage point as we watched the colourful parade of racing cars haring around the corner in front of us.’
    • ‘Edwards hares down the right and nearly latches onto a through ball from Birchall.’
    • ‘The burly prop forward, suddenly found himself at the tail of a line-out with the ball in his hands and he pinned back his ears and hared towards the line.’
    • ‘Sarah Jane spent most of the day haring across the lawn with arms waving all over the place looking like a very well dressed windmill.’
    • ‘The Saudi No23, whose name I don't know, hares past him and hooks a last-ditch cross behind the goalkeeper and across the face of goal.’
    • ‘Kryszalowicz hares down the left wing and the ball is cleared by Frechaut for a throw.’
    • ‘Button is a fine driver, but even non-petrolheads know the crucial difference between him and thousands of kids haring around the backstreets of every major city from Sao Paulo to Sydney.’
    • ‘When we left, about twoish, Vic just hared away from the front door and ran down the street.’
    • ‘Time and again I drive around a tight bend to be confronted by a high-speed bike haring towards me on my side of the road, having taken the bend way too wide.’
    • ‘I looked up towards the top of the road and saw silver Mercedes haring down.’
    • ‘Young people should settle into communes rather than keep haring from flat to flat in a vain attempt to keep up with the labour market.’
    • ‘Henry hares through the centre and is brought down outside the penalty area by Dede, who sees yellow.’
    • ‘The sight of vintage McAllister haring up the wing, a trail of defenders made to look like lumpen bystanders in his wake, thrilled us all.’
    • ‘He has already been haring about this morning, giving awards to schoolchildren and meeting with constituents.’
    • ‘Mpenza hares down the wing, pulls the ball back to his captain who shoots.’
    be quick, hurry up, move quickly, go fast, hasten, make haste, speed, speed up, lose no time, press on, push on, run, dash, rush, hurtle, dart, race, fly, flash, shoot, streak, bolt, bound, blast, charge, chase, career, scurry, scramble, scamper, scuttle, sprint, gallop, go hell for leather, go like lightning
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • run with the hare and hunt with the hounds

    • Try to remain on good terms with both sides in a conflict or dispute.

      • ‘Or maybe, they wanted to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.’
      • ‘This disease of taking the law into one's hands has its inspiration from the fact that the Government is trying to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.’
      • ‘It has chosen to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.’
      • ‘The Washington Post has recently reported how the president continues to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.’
      • ‘The reality is that you cannot run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.’
      • ‘Experiment calls Beuys's work to mind - it tries to run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.’
      • ‘This is not an issue in which, to use the Least of New Labour of metaphors, he can run with the hare and hunt with the hounds.’

Origin

Old English hara, of Germanic origin: related to Dutch haas and German Hase.

Pronunciation

hare

/hɛr//her/