Definition of hardman in English:

hardman

noun

informal
  • A tough, aggressive, or ruthless man.

    • ‘Yes folks even hard men like Roy Keane have consciences.’
    • ‘Hard men like Joe call him "traitor."’
    • ‘If you want to find hard men, you have to give them means to express their hardness.’
    • ‘Until recently there was no-one to beat the Newsnight hardman.’
    • ‘Aaron plays the lead role as a hard man who runs a garage with two friends.’
    • ‘I have been expecting to encounter the hard man of British politics.’
    • ‘Maybe then the Socialist is just a hard man.’
    • ‘He is now, almost officially, a hard man.’
    • ‘Once, drinking with a then in-house disciple of Honbu dojo, a rough, hard man, Yasunori spoke openly of something personal.’
    • ‘I'd realised it back on the dive boat: nothing beats a hard man in a tight spot.’
    • ‘He has a reputation as a hard man, but he's a really great guy.’
    • ‘Shamed television star Michael Barrymore is taking another step to rehabilitate his career by playing a hard man in a new British film.’
    • ‘South Africans can be pretty tough guys, but they need to realise that European cycling is a hard man's game.’
    • ‘The guys he got in with were not your usual drug ridden theives they were professional hard men, they carried guns.’
    • ‘He installed a new breed of official, mostly former KGB men nicknamed the Siloviki, or " hard men ".’
    • ‘John Baker is considered by many to be the best of the hard men.’
    • ‘This Dr. Phil, hes not what the Brits call a hard man.’
    • ‘For all his work with leper children in Kolkata, Waugh is a hard man.’
    • ‘Phil may be a big lad, but for all his much-vaunted hard man status, he strikes me as somewhat out of shape.’
    • ‘We had the misfortune to be sitting amongst, what I imagine are the self-proclaimed hard men of Leicester City Football Club.’

Pronunciation:

hardman

/ˈhärdman/