Definition of hardbody in English:

hardbody

noun

informal
  • A person with very toned or well-developed muscles.

    ‘you're in the cockpit of a ragtop Testarossa with a tanned, blond hardbody at your side’
    • ‘And while she might not love you any more if you were more of a hardbody, she wouldn't mind, either.’
    • ‘‘Even the hardbodies at the gym now admit that walking has a place in a well-rounded fitness regimen,’ says Mark Fenton, author of The Complete Guide to Walking and host of PBS ' America's Walking.’
    • ‘Seeing these anonymous hardbodies cavort in Belize, you don't feel their relationships are in danger, or that there's much worth saving anyway.’
    • ‘Like previous FLEXY winner Madonna, this now 41-year-old mother of three reinvented herself as a hardbody in the '90s, and she shows no signs of going soft.’
    • ‘Although only one winner struts away with the grand prize, every entrant gets the consolation prize of a lifetime: a brand-new hardbody.’
    • ‘This April's Eco-Challenge Argentina, in which teams of four hardbodies raced by foot and horse and kayak for 12 days across 197 miles of Patagonia, was the worst.’
    • ‘Serenity's a petite blonde with the perfect definition of a hardbody and slightly chipmunk cheeks that only serve to make her all the more adorable.’
    • ‘Even Gidget wasn't portrayed as a bronzed hardbody with at 9-foot board under her arm.’
    • ‘He always squares up to the camera and delivers the painfully amusing line ‘A hardbody is a little sexy fox you find down on the beach.’’
    • ‘And afterwards, I like standing on the pavement outside a crowded bar with the other managers and a pint of Stella, eyeing up the hardbodies.’
    • ‘‘Abs need to be treated like any major bodypart,’ says Gregory Joujon-Roche of Holistic Fitness - whom Demi Moore, among others, can thank at least in part for her hardbody.’
    • ‘Triathlon, the arcane sport of masochists, is poised to hit it big, with a high-profile Olympic debut and two camera-ready hardbodies in a duel for glory.’
    • ‘WORK YOUR ABS and your ego with the hardbodies at the new David Barton Gym in Chelsea, where DJs spin tunes, the floors are faux leather, and you can watch a fiber-optic light show in the steam bath.’
    • ‘But playing mixed presenting doubles with Sue Barker will probably be a doddle for the towering hardbody, who effortlessly sails through one of the busiest schedules in sports broadcasting.’
    • ‘They are Alan Johnson and Michael Arciero, forty-something hardbodies who have coached cycling at the U.S. Military Academy, at West Point.’
    • ‘‘And they are all hardbodies,’ she says, using the industry term that refers to the youngest dancers, usually 18-21 years old.’
    • ‘I agree with you about the ‘glossy 20-something hardbodies.’’
    • ‘Every few hours, a group of young hardbodies would wow the throng with their kayaking tricks.’
    • ‘And if these exciting steps forward really do change America's eating habits, we can all look forward to a summer filled with even more toned hardbodies than usual.’
    • ‘Each show is held under the open sky, housed by the white, belle époque walls of Sunnyside. Kids scamper on the beach nearby, hardbodies play volleyball.’

Pronunciation:

hardbody

/ˈhärdˌbädē/