Definition of hard stuff in English:

hard stuff

noun

informal
  • Strong liquor.

    • ‘Known to drink up to four bottles of vodka a day, this accomplished boozer can take the hard stuff in waves.’
    • ‘Reels and jigs, marches and waltzes, strathspeys, airs and hornpipes flow once the guests are lubricated with a drop of the hard stuff.’
    • ‘Born in Diamond Street, York, Mr Milner now lives in Osgodby, near Selby, where he celebrated his centenary with a piece of birthday cake and, of course, a drop of the hard stuff.’
    • ‘A record 18 per cent of Brits now eschew a drop of the hard stuff, according to The Drink Pocket Book 2001.’
    • ‘One reason I prefer the hard stuff, ‘she grinned, nodding to the open bar in the corner.’’
    • ‘But, tut-tut, she has now agreed to a bumper pay packet to become the face of Martini, a once-fashionable alcoholic beverage even though she never touches the hard stuff.’
    • ‘Be that as it may, it is generally accepted that Fr. Foy had a liking for strong drink and some of the stories place him in pubs and outside a glass of the hard stuff.’
    • ‘In comparison, just 16 percent of 55-to 64 year olds feel they're harming themselves by drinking the hard stuff.’
    • ‘In pursuit of that admonition, legions of writers and artists have swallowed oceans of the hard stuff, often with little harm being done other than to cracked heads and angry livers.’
    • ‘And if they try to introduce coffee bars - or even a drop of the hard stuff - they are laughed out of court for trying to take on Waterstone's.’
    • ‘If he wins his fourth Open title on Sunday, Famous Grouse has promised to dish out 300 free drams of the hard stuff.’
    • ‘He likes to jab at his opponents with beer then finish them off with a flurry of the hard stuff.’
    • ‘She didn't start on the hard stuff until she'd moved pubs a couple of times and realised it was dark out.’
    • ‘This is logical because the only justifiable reason to pay extra for a select bottle of the hard stuff is to capture its suggestive exquisiteness, which can only be appreciated straight or, maybe on the rocks.’
    • ‘They didn't have time to pound a twelve-pack of beer or muse over a bottle of Beaujolais; they needed a quick high-proof fix, a fast belt of the hard stuff to smooth things out and move them along.’
    • ‘He turned to Rob, ‘I thought she was laying off the hard stuff?’’
    • ‘My brother Manuel's nickname was ‘litron,’ meaning big bottle of liquor because he liked the hard stuff a lot.’
    • ‘All this will be followed by a traditional Christmas dinner with turkey and all the trimmings, a drop of the hard stuff, of course, and a live dance band as in the days of old.’
    • ‘At least our support diver, Sane Roger, indulged in a dram or three of the hard stuff.’
    • ‘It seems the beer was OK; he just had to avoid the hard stuff.’