Main definitions of hap in US English:

: hap1hap2

hap1

noun

archaic
  • 1Luck; fortune.

    • ‘When an event occurs by mere hap, there is an element of randomness in its coming about; it might not have occurred, even if all of the conditions relevant to its production had been the same.’
    • ‘And yes, we got ourselves kidnapped by a bunch of off-duty and retired soldiers who were enjoying a Friday beating up hapless journalists (and boy, were we showing no hap at all) far too much.’
    • ‘Notice that in this case we will have a violation of the doctrine of determinism, and indeed determinism might be expressed simply as the thesis that nothing ever occurs by mere hap.’
    1. 1.1 A chance occurrence, especially an event that is considered unlucky.
      • ‘Whether he makes a lame attempt for a steal or a weak effort at a double-team hap, the result is usually an easy basket for an opponent.’
      • ‘Happen gives us take place, arrive, come, recur; hap generates chance, accident, hazard, event.’

verb

[no object]archaic
  • 1Come about by chance.

    ‘what can hap to him worthy to be deemed evil?’
    • ‘The weirdest thing happed to me a few days ago.’
    • ‘It happed to be that the ‘dove’ was actually a courier, warning him that the feast was to begin in less than an hour.’
    • ‘In the case of the policeman who is suing for being put back on the beat, he described an incident where he happed upon the scene of a road accident and was too scared to go and help.’
    • ‘It happed most often to Jennifer Grey for some reason.’
    • ‘He said: ‘It was, without a doubt, the best thing that happed to the club.’’
    occur, take place, come about, come off, come into being
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1with infinitive Have the fortune or luck to do something.
      ‘where'er I happ'd to roam’

Origin

Middle English: from Old Norse happ.

Pronunciation

hap

/hap//hæp/

Main definitions of hap in US English:

: hap1hap2

hap2

verb

[with object]Scottish, Northern Irish
  • Cover or wrap with a blanket or warm clothes.

    ‘Col rode on her back, happed up in a tartan plaid’
    ‘my Mum happed me up’
    • ‘Partygoers have been warned only to leave the house well happed up and with an umbrella.’
    • ‘Hap up well, young man, his teachers had always tellt him.’
    • ‘I know the forecast is still looking pretty grim, but I am really looking forward to my final day of being happed up on the cathedral steps.’
    • ‘Andrina, happed in a plaid dressing-gown, shuffled back into the room.’
    • ‘He picked up Flossie and happed her in his coat.’

Origin

Late Middle English: of uncertain origin; perhaps an alteration of lap.

Pronunciation

hap

/hap//hæp/