Definition of hankering in English:

hankering

noun

  • A strong desire to have or do something.

    ‘a hankering for family life’
    [with infinitive] ‘he had a hankering to return to Scotland’
    • ‘Coming from a long line of plumbers, his lifelong hankering for an acting career had somehow never seemed a realistic option.’
    • ‘Over the weekend I found myself with a hankering to see lousy movies.’
    • ‘He feels no hankering to play rounds with his former pool hall friends.’
    • ‘Coffee options are tailored not just to a hankering for sweet or bitter, black or milky.’
    • ‘Adults, with a hankering for childish humour, will delight in his misadventures.’
    • ‘I had a hankering to drive the ocean road.’
    • ‘These more serious hazards are not necessarily reasons to deny your hankering for adventure.’
    • ‘Frustratingly, one aspect of the dream appeared to be a hankering for restoration of parts of the past.’
    • ‘No motive was established for the crime, beyond a vague hankering for the bachelor life.’
    • ‘Many a Texan hankering for venison has settled for a cheeseburger.’
    • ‘I have an unhealthy hankering for a new chair.’
    • ‘I have a hankering to start off the new study with a new computer.’
    • ‘Our culture, he believes, is given over to unbridled curiosity and a constant hankering for the forbidden.’
    • ‘Next time you get a hankering for a beach vacation, check out this paradise.’
    • ‘Rubin says he has always had a hankering for public life.’
    • ‘I have a hankering for some space combat again.’
    • ‘I want to stress this wasn't an amicable parting of the ways or a hankering on my part for fresh representation.’
    • ‘Even though I know the book takes priority, I have a real hankering to write some short stuff.’
    • ‘En route to home I got a hankering for a big thick hot American Pastrami sandwich.’
    • ‘I also developed a hankering to learn Spanish in the new academic year.’

Pronunciation:

hankering

/ˈhaNGkəriNG/