Definition of hang together in English:

hang together

phrasal verb

  • 1Make sense; be consistent.

    ‘it helps the speech to hang together’
    • ‘They want information that hangs together, that makes sense, that has some degree of order to it.’
    • ‘We who hear and read stories are good at telling whether a plot makes sense, hangs together, or whether the story remains unfinished.’
    • ‘The plot barely hung together, it was so full of holes.’
    • ‘In fact, much of the script seems to consist of pieces of unfinished scenes that do not clearly hang together.’
    • ‘His interpretation and speculation hang together, make sense, and are consistent with the sources.’
    • ‘But the characters are staying consistent and the whole thing hangs together with much more coherence that I thought it possessed.’
    • ‘In fact, considering the number of plotlines on the go, it's amazing that the film hangs together enough to give you an overall sense of theme.’
    • ‘I would say the plot hung together, the dialogue was not too cliched, and there was just about enough characterisation.’
    • ‘But this may have been an attack of literary nerves because he feared the poem would not be taken seriously unless it appeared to hang together as a coherent whole.’
    • ‘That book might have been more fluffy than this one but at least it hung together and made some sense.’
  • 2(of people) remain associated; help or support each other.

    • ‘Travel and hospitality was a way of life among the Elizabethan Catholic nobility who hung together for mutual support.’
    • ‘I think that the international community may not be hanging together to deal with these things.’
    • ‘Traditionally speaking, it's the Republicans that are said to be the party that hangs together more decisively, more politely than the Democrats.’
    • ‘‘Everybody here hangs together, no matter what your age is or what you do,’ says Bégin, adding that the band, like its town, is above generation and gender gaps.’
    • ‘It is too much to expect individuals to thwart the intentions of a closely knit, overwhelmingly dominating force which knows it must either hang together or be hanged together.’
    • ‘I think there is recognition that unless we work together and unless we hang together we make much less of an impact internationally.’
    • ‘They hung together and cheered the quality rides of each team member, leaving to other clubs the slightly overdone exuberances of attracting media and public attention.’
    • ‘There are signs of the premiers now working together and hanging together, notwithstanding the traditional ‘divide and rule’ tactics of the Feds.’
    • ‘But somehow, we all hung together; we worked 90 days straight that summer.’
    • ‘Yet, as inexperienced as they undoubtedly were, the players hung together, eschewed the insularity that has plagued the region and produced the most rewarding and hopeful performance in the last match.’