Main definitions of hack in English

: hack1hack2hack3

hack1

verb

  • 1with object Cut with rough or heavy blows.

    ‘hack off the dead branches’
    no object ‘a fishmonger hacked at it with a cleaver’
    • ‘It is as if the corner of a Rembrandt has been hacked off, so it is extremely important that we don't rush in and make a mess of it.’
    • ‘He smashed the back window with a fire extinguisher, while others hacked at the roof.’
    • ‘She had wavy black hair that looked like it had been hacked at with a knife.’
    • ‘He ran forward and began to hack at him, each slash more powerful than the last.’
    • ‘With a machete, he hacked low branches and vines to clear the boat's path through the flooded forest.’
    • ‘The ice was supplied by a local fish factory and re-applied every night to a vertical wall after being hacked at all day by ice axes.’
    • ‘He's got really tight curls so I've only ever used the clippers or hacked at it myself but I haven't done this for about eight months now so it was getting quite long.’
    • ‘But that would be to hack off the branches of the argument rather than to undermine the roots.’
    • ‘It's very tempting to hack off your black, down-your-back hair for a platinum blonde buzz cut when you're hungry for a funky new look.’
    • ‘Whirling bodies slashed and hacked at each other; the slaughter was horrendous.’
    • ‘He hacked at a wall of vines, which fell and revealed a gaping, black hole.’
    • ‘He lifted it and hacked at the door again, and again, and small chips of wood started to fly off.’
    • ‘We all threw blankets over him, and he had to hack off this charred mass with a Swiss Army Knife.’
    • ‘Police in Trowbridge are appealing for witnesses after thugs hacked at a tree in the park on Saturday afternoon.’
    • ‘He'd shimmy up with a machete, hack them off and let them fall to the ground.’
    • ‘A school has been forced to admit it made a mistake after allowing geology students to hack at the rock face of a beauty spot on a field trip.’
    • ‘People with knives hacked at the bodies of the dead.’
    • ‘These arborists climb high in an ancient oak tree and drag along a chain saw to hack off dead branches, which they let crash to the ground.’
    • ‘I grinned as I hacked at my old jeans, turning them into a pair of shorts.’
    • ‘The Romans' idea of a great evening was to watch gladiators hack each other apart, and then top it off with a drunken orgy.’
    cut, chop, hew, lop, saw
    View synonyms
  • 2no object Use a computer to gain unauthorized access to data in a system.

    ‘they hacked into the bank's computer’
    with object ‘someone hacked his computer from another location’
    ‘outlawing hacking has not stopped it’
    • ‘A Florida teenager was banged up for six months yesterday after admitting he hacked into NASA systems.’
    • ‘He started hacking at 14, when he and a schoolfriend had a running game of trying to get into each other's websites.’
    • ‘The screen froze a moment, then flashed, indicating that the block was up, and that the trade organization wouldn't be able to locate where they were hacking from.’
    • ‘First of all, you know we sent you that message, after you hacked into our database.’
    • ‘Mike easily hacked into the mainframe of the US government building and began to look for a map of the layout of the building, or at least a blueprint.’
    • ‘Then he hacked into the computer systems and transferred money from the base's account to ours, wiping his trail clean.’
    • ‘I hope his girlfriend breaks up with him today, his dog runs away and someone hacks into his AOL account and uses it to send threatening emails to the president.’
    • ‘She had already hacked into the Government computers within a few minutes.’
    • ‘After hacking farther into the American Personnel files, he found the name of the chief investigator on the case.’
    • ‘They seized books on hacking, a laptop computer and four desktop machines from his bedroom.’
    • ‘At the moment, banks and building societies usually cover the costs of crime, and will refund any losses if someone clones your credit card or hacks into your online account.’
    • ‘East Carolina University has fired a computer services employee who admitted to hacking into the school's computer network nearly three years ago.’
    • ‘He hacked into my e-mail accounts and read all my mail, new and old.’
    • ‘I believe with further hacking it would be possible to control a fairly robust corporate or personal website with a wiki backend.’
    • ‘We now have a maximum sentence of 7 years for reckless damage to a computer, 5 years for taking trade secrets, and 2 years for hacking.’
    • ‘In thirty seconds she'd hacked into the access computer.’
    • ‘It will also prevent outsiders hacking into police messages and allow police to go out on foot in rural areas safe in the knowledge that they are linked to the rest of the network.’
    • ‘And those indulging in hacking but with malicious and criminal intent are crackers.’
    • ‘BT would give no details of how someone could have hacked into the system.’
    • ‘She had hacked into the CIA database and got the picture.’
  • 3hack itinformal usually with negative Manage; cope.

    ‘lots of people leave because they can't hack it’
    • ‘I could never hack it as a full-time, stay-at-home dad.’
    • ‘This way I could feel like part of a community instead of the lone, sole loser, the one who couldn't hack it.’
    • ‘You wouldn't take a job like mine if you couldn't hack it.’
    • ‘Because you will never be able to hack it in the modern world.’
    • ‘As the name implies, it means I've given up and I just can't hack it anymore.’
    • ‘In one swift move, he has learned that life is tough at the cutting edge of Scottish journalism and if you can't hack it, put a knot in it.’
    • ‘I think it may be all some kind of test - throw Matt a project to manage on his second day and see if he can hack it.’
    • ‘Who know's what the future will hold there (and how long I'll be able to hack it - reckon about a year or so).’
    • ‘Will they be able to hack it under fire at the general election?’
    • ‘And now, we learn that its greatest champions in Europe can't hack it.’
    • ‘Many baritone players are guys who couldn't really hack it as trumpet players.’
    • ‘Vote for other independents; at least you'll know they can hack it on their own.’
    • ‘Chris Cusiter proved he can hack it on the big stage and the late revival showed that the men in the thistle jerseys at least have pride in their professionalism.’
    • ‘The question is, can he still hack it live. Well, can he?’
    • ‘If they find that she can't hack it over two miles at the top level she'll take her place in the World Hurdle instead, but that's not the dream.’
    • ‘I should be used to this by now, but I can't hack it.’
    • ‘Do Leigh have the temperament to hack it on the big occasion without losing their composure, and consequently, the match?’
    • ‘The real surprise is how often the paid help - our legislators - agree that they can't hack it and put propositions on the ballot themselves.’
    • ‘Bearing in mind the conditions which affected both sides and caused lots of mistakes, it was Australia who just couldn't hack it when it came down to the crunch.’
    • ‘What you will not see is any mention of those students who couldn't hack it, or who didn't do any better than if they had gone through the regular school system.’
    cope, manage, get on, get along, get by, carry on, muddle through, muddle along, come through, stand on one's own two feet, weather the storm
    View synonyms

noun

  • 1A rough cut, blow, or stroke.

    ‘he was sure one of us was going to take a hack at him’
    • ‘He aims for the right hip of lefthanded hitters, and if the sinker breaks properly, they are unable to take a good hack as it crosses the inner half of the plate.’
    • ‘The extra time has paid off; Blalock has cut down on his first-pitch hacks and is hitting better than.300.’
    • ‘But with so many first- and second-pitch hacks, I was too heavy on the button, so I missed at least one half-inning.’
    • ‘Combe though soon struck back after another Havant attack, which included more fortuitous hacks, was intercepted by Knuckley who took play deep into the home 22.’
    • ‘Only a courageous tackle by young Matthews and a fortuitous hack on saved the day as West Leeds attacked.’
    • ‘He is impatient, which leads to a lot of bad hacks.’
    • ‘His hack out of the 22 broke the Ripon siege on Ilkley's line.’
    • ‘In this hack and slash action adventure you control a party three characters - a fighter, sorcerer and rogue.’
    • ‘So, Jude chopped it down with only a few hacks from his hatchet and he and Josie carried it home.’
    • ‘He grabbed two tries in the win at Wilderspool and repeated the brace showing blistering pace to chase Bobbie Goulding's kick and then his own hack ahead.’
    • ‘Weatherby made it 19-7 with a hack and chase to touch down.’
    • ‘Jeff has a slightly open stance and takes a wicked hack at pitches he likes.’
    • ‘A stroll along the beach in search of seals and shells, or a hack around the hotel's six-hole golf course, is outing enough for most.’
    • ‘Caden's red practice jersey matches those of the players taking hacks in the batting cage, hours before a game against the Padres.’
    • ‘Cabrera sat down in between prodigious hacks in the batting-practice cage and said he had a lot to learn.’
    • ‘A spot of possession allows Hamann to take a hack from 30 yards.’
    • ‘A major scare followed as Nick Bell had trouble clearing up a kick through allowing Selby a hack on and chase but the ball went dead.’
    • ‘He used to take hacks at my tires after school.’
    • ‘My preparation amounted to a windswept hack around the Silverknowes course in Edinburgh.’
    • ‘He also smashed a couple of hacks high into the crowd.’
    1. 1.1 (in sports) a kick or hit inflicted on another player.
      • ‘It that been that way from the moment in the fourth minute when Ferdinand became the first of nine bookings by Andy D' Urso for a silly hack at William Gallas.’
      • ‘Absolutely needless foul conceded by Van Der Meyde for a hack at Ljungberg.’
      • ‘While he did catch him in the head, the hack in no way merited a suspension.’
      • ‘It might be more than fair to wonder where the points are going to come from when so many bumps and hacks aren't whistled.’
      • ‘Gonzalez has a hack at someone else - who makes sure the ref knows he's in ‘agony’.’
      • ‘Unfortunately for Marc and Bobby Sura, he took out many months of anger on Sura's head with a vicious hack as the Warrior attempted a layup.’
      • ‘Coly is booked for a little hack on Alexandersson.’
      • ‘Vieira picked up his first caution for a hack at van Bommel, who himself was lucky to escape a caution for following through on Campbell.’
      • ‘After that, Justin Gregory might also have gone, but was so inexpert in trying to kick Jeffers that he missed with the hack.’
      • ‘The Dens player-boss, claiming the hack was unintended, almost agreed.’
      • ‘Frings is booked for a Deco-v-Holland-style hack at Deco.’
      • ‘Cafu has a hack at Cahill's ankles and trots sheepishly away as Culina lines up the free-kick.’
      • ‘The second card, for Quashie, did follow an intentional, brutish hack at Belmadi, who went looking for revenge and was also booked.’
      • ‘Barnetta does his finest Cristiano Ronaldo impression, welling up as the ref takes his name for a hack at Shelayev.’
      • ‘Yellow card for Mauricio Solis for a despicable hack on Edison Mendez.’
      • ‘The play was a little chippy, with what looked like Pippen taking some strong hacks at Celtics players.’
    2. 1.2 A tool for rough striking or cutting, e.g. a mattock or a miner's pick.
    3. 1.3archaic A cut or gash.
  • 2informal An act of computer hacking.

    • ‘The firm is helping federal special agents to search the internet for any evidence that may led the FBI to the people behind the hacks.’
    • ‘Fraud, not a computer hack, is responsible for the latest breach of more than 140,000 personal data records.’
    • ‘Every hacker is at one and the same time producer and product of the hack, and emerges in its singularity as the memory of the hack as process.’
    • ‘The China Daily has an article about the hack together with a screen shot of the hacked site.’
    • ‘The problem is, however, that the tools and methods are very much the same for a classic hack as for a computer terrorist act.’
    • ‘Thompson's hack was to modify the login program so that it would accept both your password or a password he specified and hard-coded into the system as valid.’
    • ‘For them, each hack presented a new challenge and, in most cases, a new victory.’
    • ‘The way in which the attack was carried out indicates that this was no ordinary hack.’
    • ‘Jen wouldn't try this big of a hack on any other computer because she wouldn't be able to cover her tracks, but with this computer she could.’
    • ‘The end result was about two hours after going back online, they were hacked again with the same hack.’
    • ‘As some of you may know, the source code was leaked before launch, so Valve is re-writing portions of it to address the potential problems of front-end hacks.’
    • ‘Beyond stating it's confident that no customer data was jeopardised by the hack, the company is staying schtum about the embarrassing security breach.’
    • ‘I've been inundated with emails about this, and just now someone sent me a screenshot of the hack.’
    • ‘We reported on this hack of their website yesterday.’
    • ‘On the other hand, you post warnings about bugs and viruses, then post on the same page a hack to help screw with people's email.’
    • ‘I think the whole ecommerce-targeted hack last week was ever-so-slightly amusing.’
    • ‘The hacks are coming faster; the time between the revelation of a software vulnerability and a related exploitation by hackers is decreasing.’
    • ‘In the moment before data is re-encrypted, it is left vulnerable to a hack.’
    • ‘A dictionary hack would crack that password in a few moments.’
    • ‘Several media accounts described the data breach as a computer hack.’
    1. 2.1 A piece of computer code providing a quick or inelegant solution to a particular problem.
      ‘this hack doesn't work on machines that have a firewall’
      • ‘Technically, both were easily customizable hacks built on open-source software and generic hardware.’
      • ‘Keyboard hacks can be an extremely low-cost way to go, and can either be fun or infuriating to build depending on your temperament and soldering skill.’
      • ‘The economy models make excellent alternatives to keyboard hacks, providing the functionality of a keyboard hack with less effort involved.’
      • ‘I'm not sure MS can devise some sort of hack to fix that, but maybe there's a ISAPI plugin that can.’
      • ‘Some people will comment here or email me and say how easy it is to implement all the hacks and scripts, how easy it is to fool with the templates and that's great for those people.’
      • ‘We can now overclock video cards with registry hacks, and software such as Powerstrip.’
      • ‘If you are going to pursue a keyboard hack, there is a good article on the Internet that I suggest consulting as an addendum to the material presented here.’
      • ‘You have many excellent alternatives to a keyboard hack available to you today.’
      • ‘Seems that the upgraded firmware, hacks, and possibly GTA are the only major factors getting any real attention.’
      • ‘I figured I'd hit a sticking point eventually and if necessary, resort to some ugly table hack to finish the job.’
      • ‘It is possible to successfully use a keyboard hack, but there are several obstacles to overcome first.’
      • ‘To get my mac to the same, I had to setup a similar program, and both hacks ended up constantly sending flat files to my server over insecure FTP.’
      • ‘I actually am looking for a hack or script that would change the color of a mobile device in my buddy list.’
      • ‘In the early years, designers used tricks like animated GIFs and table hacks in clever, interesting and horrible ways.’
      • ‘The best way to keep sites simple is to use the most efficient way of coding an effect, avoiding both CSS hacks and JavaScript objects.’
      • ‘To the developer, making Linux work on an iPod is more than a clever hack or a technical challenge.’
      • ‘We geeks who buy the latest and greatest will often gleefully trade work-a-rounds, hacks, or other tidbits of information needed to make things work.’
      • ‘Linksys, now owned by Cisco, not only doesn't mind your hacking the box, they are including some of those hacks in their revised firmware.’
      • ‘Not all of the techniques will work cross-browser without some CSS hacks, and some of the hacks will cause your code to be invalid.’
      • ‘It's become clear that Web page authors must move beyond the current grab bag of hacks and workarounds and learn to write compliant and efficient markup.’
    2. 2.2 A strategy or technique for managing one's time or activities more efficiently.
      ‘there's one easy hack to avoid the eight dollar popcorn trap: eat before you get to the theater’

Phrasal Verbs

  • hack around

    • Pass one's time idly or with no definite purpose.

      • ‘Because I'm going to make the improvements on this new ship of yours before I decide to start hacking around.’
      • ‘We were playing a lot together, hacking around, and drinking a lot of free beer.’
      • ‘To be hacking around in his company is to be handed the ultimate humiliation.’
      • ‘It had to be a directed activity - dozing in the sun would be hacking around, but building a dam in the creek would not be.’
      • ‘I had no lessons or anything, so I kind of hacked around until I was 17, then I quit.’
      • ‘The Racquet Clubbers had little in common with the inventors of squash - aimless schoolboys hacking around back alleys avoiding homework.’
      • ‘I just hacked around town on my own, running errands.’
  • hack someone off

    • Annoy or infuriate someone.

      • ‘Car culture per se puts my teeth on edge, but TV ads for cars tend to be part of the more visible opinion formation/reflection mechanism and hence hack me off.’
      • ‘Is it me or does it hack you off when some nobody scoots off with our claret jug?’
      • ‘I had no business bidding anyway and it's better I lost, but the winner, a woman with money who's cornered the memorabilia market, hacks me off all the same.’
      • ‘When they did manage to win against us, they were so arrogant with their parading round the ground, it hacked us off.’
      • ‘The Government is hacked off that people are not very grateful.’
      • ‘If someone hacks me off now I have to tell them, because resentment leads to anxiety which leads to depression.’
      • ‘Congratulations - not only have you lost a regular customer, you've also hacked him off enough that he'll tell all his friends and colleagues not to use them.’
      • ‘And for those of us who'd want a game to show some semblance of purity, perhaps a little self-restraint, at least a touch of professionalism, does this deepening morass hack you off?’
      • ‘It's the smug exclamation mark that really hacks me off.’
      • ‘But really the only winners were the French and they were hacked off with the English weather, especially when they eventually reached Carlisle.’
      • ‘Casablanca is often called the finest Hollywood film of all time, which has always really hacked me off, I've never highly rated the thing.’
      • ‘It's an important issue for us women, and for a man, any man, to feel uncomfortable about her discussing it hacks her off.’
      • ‘Okay, I'm a country gal and sometimes stuff hacks me off.’
      • ‘Well, there was a whole heap of hacks and they were hacked off for a whole heap of reasons.’
      • ‘‘It's beginning to really hack me off,’ she confesses.’
      annoy, irritate, vex, make angry, make cross, anger, exasperate, irk, gall, pique, put out, displease, get someone's back up, put someone's back up, antagonize, get on someone's nerves, rub up the wrong way, ruffle, ruffle someone's feathers, make someone's hackles rise, raise someone's hackles
      View synonyms

Origin

Old English haccian ‘cut in pieces’, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch hakken and German hacken.

Pronunciation

hack

/hak//hæk/

Main definitions of hack in English

: hack1hack2hack3

hack2

noun

  • 1A writer or journalist producing dull, unoriginal work.

    as modifier ‘a hack scriptwriter’
    • ‘The article and accompanying cartoon were projected on a screen in front of a room of hacks and sub-editors, as the master dissected it.’
    • ‘Most of the folks coming are friends, but they've invited their neighbours - a hack writer and his wife - to smooth over a dispute about the dog.’
    • ‘But is her secret, as some rivals are sniffily suggesting, simply to have let tabloid newspaper hacks loose in the more respectful world of magazines?’
    • ‘Whether these journalists are hacks or heroes is not the issue.’
    • ‘We newspaper hacks have been deluding ourselves.’
    • ‘But new recruits will need to cultivate diplomacy, and that frequently eludes a successful newspaper hack.’
    • ‘Editorial and headline writers and the hacks at the television news outlets have no time for such contradictions.’
    • ‘Their slow-burning songs bear enough resemblance to Cave to have music journalists and PR hacks throwing around big nice words.’
    • ‘‘It's a stock pickers' market’ is sometimes misused by market hacks to describe a dull or flat market.’
    • ‘But even a third-rate hack, wannabe journalist like me can spot bad reporting.’
    • ‘They discovered the bar crammed full of newspaper hacks and TV presenters, tapping away at laptops and writing in notepads.’
    • ‘Meanwhile, literary hacks and Grub Street writers produced popular pot boilers for the masses.’
    • ‘Scott Roberts's screenplay crackles with crisp dialogue that's never so witty that it sounds forced, or like a hack writer showing off.’
    • ‘Was the poor gentleman under the impression that I am a councillor or a psychiatrist instead of just a newspaper hack?’
    • ‘As you will sure agree, what follows is some of the most illuminating journalism since those two hacks at the Washington Post brought Watergate down on Nixon.’
    • ‘Once upon a time, the hacks of Fleet Street and the politicians of Whitehall were all on the same side - that of the British establishment, united against the public.’
    • ‘A handful of idealistic hacks questioned the journalistic ethics of accepting freebies, but they no longer work at the paper.’
    • ‘While big budget often means lousy script and too many hacks spending the money, low-budget doesn't automatically mean quality.’
    • ‘Scriptwriters insist on depicting reporters as unscrupulous, hard-bitten hacks who'd sooner sell their granny than miss out on a scoop.’
    • ‘It was an era before distrust, cynicism, agents, and chequebook journalism permanently soured the relationship between footballers and hacks.’
    journalist, reporter, correspondent, newspaperman, newspaperwoman, newsman, newswoman, writer, feature writer, contributor, columnist, grub street writer
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A person who does dull routine work.
      • ‘A lot of people see you as talentless hacks, ripping off the Ramones.’
      • ‘This is what you get when you loan your hard-won credibility to hacks and charlatans.’
      • ‘We road-tested the ice cream on various office hacks and it went down a storm.’
      • ‘And as Norm points out, you know, no one can accuse these people of being hacks.’
      • ‘The fact that such a meeting will enable people to concentrate on issues without the party political hacks breathing down their necks is sufficient reason, I'd suggest!’
      • ‘Sadly, the cronies and party hacks who now fill his Cabinet and backroom offices fall some way short of that ideal.’
      • ‘It is apparent that he has become a hack in the service of a candidate for the highest office in the land.’
      • ‘The story fed by his enemies in the Agency is that dedicated career intelligence officers have been replaced by Capitol Hill hacks.’
      • ‘The media quickly picked up the vibe; from the very beginning he was portrayed as a drudge, a hack, a bore and, therefore, a loser.’
      • ‘As potent, according to both Lib Dems and Labour hacks, were the ultra local issues.’
      • ‘Lisa, you don't need the money and you certainly could find better ways to spend it than hiring unoriginal hacks with whom to collaborate.’
      • ‘He's going to bring in a whole new batch of people rather than these political hacks who've destroyed our economy.’
      • ‘These are the people that EU hacks are thinking of when they hold their three day workshops on the need to address people's ‘insecurities’.’
      • ‘The director is a left nationalist, but he is neither a charlatan nor a hack.’
      • ‘I too think I understand them, and I think they are quacks, hacks, and lying charlatans motivated solely by greed.’
      • ‘When his company probes management structures, exposing the fact that bosses are party hacks or people appointed because of connections, the clients often balk.’
      • ‘For me, an advertising hack, the right kind is the person who will offer me a job one day.’
      • ‘And vote counters should be nonpartisan public servants, not secretive corporations or party hacks.’
      • ‘Wandering through the Conference Hotel late at night, one could not move for clearly affluent young people in suits and lean and hungry aspiring hacks.’
      • ‘I was friendly with the Student Union hacks and lots of people in the debating society and law.’
      drudge, menial, menial worker, factotum, toiler, plodder, doormat, hewer of wood and drawer of water
      View synonyms
  • 2A horse for ordinary riding.

    • ‘They are quite often sent off on loan for someone to use as hacks or show jump them.’
    • ‘The stables catered for hacks, hunters, carriage horses and carriages and the Georgian quadrangle was established as the ideal pattern.’
    • ‘A Munnings horse on the other hand has a lot of the stable about it - a lot of knowledge, no doubt, and a lot to attract others who know their hacks, hunters and ponies.’
    • ‘As to who of the above appeared on the sacred gallops on bicycles, who on hacks and who in motors, we can only surmise.’
    • ‘English breeders are turning their attention chiefly to hacks, hunters and heavy draft horses.’
    nag, inferior horse, tired-out horse, worn-out horse, rosinante
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1 A good-quality lightweight riding horse, especially one used in the show ring.
      • ‘A type of high-class riding horse, the hack is associated almost exclusively with the show ring.’
    2. 2.2 A ride on a horse.
      • ‘Sunday is also unofficially Kids Day and there will more horse events including junior hacks and riding classes as well as some fun prizes for the prettiest mare and handsomest colt in the gala ring.’
      • ‘My horse actually got a scab on her leg from a hack and I've spent the last four days at the barn treating it and of course, riding!’
      • ‘Lessons continued in her 21-horse centre, but the country hacks, popular with tourists, have stopped, bringing a massive loss of business.’
      • ‘One favoured method of working off excess energy before a work out or a hack is to lunge the horse for a short period before mounting.’
      • ‘Bally seemed content with her new role: grazing the field was interrupted by the odd hack out, and then back to eating.’
    3. 2.3 A horse rented out for riding.
    4. 2.4 An inferior or worn-out horse.
      • ‘A smart trainer at Newmarket will ride out on the Heath on his hack, which may be a sumptuous former racehorse.’
      • ‘Having escaped serious injury throughout his racing career, Tommy was lamed for life through a fall from his hack while riding to the post office in the Curragh Camp.’
      nag, inferior horse, tired-out horse, worn-out horse, rosinante
      View synonyms
  • 3North American A taxicab.

    • ‘You're going to have to take me or I'll turn you in and you'll lose your hack license.’
    taxi, cab, taxi cab, minicab, hackney cab
    View synonyms

verb

[NO OBJECT]usually as noun hacking
  • Ride a horse for pleasure or exercise.

    • ‘Many bridleways were closed following the outbreak of the disease, and riders had to exercise their horses on private land or hack out on tarmac roads.’
    • ‘On a fine day, straddle a horse, stir your stirrups and hack through Glentress forest.’
    • ‘Some years ago I was out hacking on my young horse.’
    • ‘I ride horses, and enjoy hacking across the countryside.’
    • ‘If you don't need to get fit that quickly, think in terms of lots of walking, hacking and hill work.’
    • ‘Friars' Hill is a riding school approved by the British Horse Society to provide instruction, trekking, hacking, livery and jumping up to BHS level A2.’
    • ‘She was used for hacking but her owner was pregnant and the horse was too much for her.’

Origin

Middle English (in hack (sense 2 of the noun)): abbreviation of hackney. hack (sense 1 of the noun) dates from the late 17th century.

Pronunciation

hack

/hak//hæk/

Main definitions of hack in English

: hack1hack2hack3

hack3

noun

  • 1Falconry
    A board on which a hawk's meat is laid.

    • ‘‘Take up’ is sometimes used to mean to withdraw a hawk from the mews or from hack with a view to preparing her for hunting.’
  • 2A wooden frame for drying bricks, cheeses, etc.

    1. 2.1 A pile of bricks stacked up to dry before firing.

Phrases

  • at hack

    • (of a young hawk) given partial liberty but not yet allowed to hunt for itself.

      • ‘To be at hack is to be in the state of partial liberty in which eyas hawks are kept before being trained, not being allowed to prey for themselves.’
      • ‘For a hawk at hack, food is often tied to the hack board to discourage her from forming the habit of carrying.’

Origin

Late Middle English (denoting the lower half of a divided door): variant of hatch.

Pronunciation

hack

/hak//hæk/