Definition of habit in English:

habit

noun

  • 1A settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up.

    ‘we stayed together out of habit’
    ‘this can develop into a bad habit’
    • ‘I have a bad habit of saying yes, if you can call that a bad habit.’
    • ‘I have a bad habit of going on trips and never recording my impressions of the places I've been too.’
    • ‘Riddled with guilt, I told her it was a bad habit and that I was going to stop.’
    • ‘I know it's a bad habit, eating sweets in he morning, but strawberry shortcake is my favorite food.’
    • ‘Yes, if you hadn't noticed yet, Pat had a bad habit of swearing regularly.’
    • ‘With dinner party after dinner party, it's difficult to not stray from your regular eating habits.’
    • ‘If there is a bad habit I should get rid of I guess it would be to stop criticizing people.’
    • ‘I have a bad habit of staying in bed till the last minute and then scurrying about in the morning, rushing to get to whatever my first appointment of the day is.’
    • ‘Our cat has developed an annoying habit of standing on people's faces during the night.’
    • ‘New research on the listening habits of music fans has revealed that many now plug in their ear-phones out of habit rather than for enjoyment.’
    • ‘I have a bad habit of voicing my own true opinions.’
    • ‘All groups maintained their regular eating habits over the 12 weeks.’
    • ‘Jen's got a bad habit of working too hard on something though.’
    • ‘It is true the consequences of such a bad habit are severe.’
    • ‘I have a bad habit of not closing the blinds properly or forgetting that the curtains are open.’
    • ‘People have a bad habit of comparing space travel with air travel.’
    • ‘I watched a ton of television as a kid, so I have a bad habit of getting sucked into shows for hours.’
    • ‘The increase in childhood obesity is also largely due to eating and exercise habits rather than a tendency toward low fat diets.’
    • ‘It twists your stomach into knots and forces you to abandon any regular eating habits.’
    • ‘I had a bad habit of aggravating people; perhaps it was because they couldn't classify me.’
    practice, custom, pattern, routine, style, convention, policy, wont, way, manner, mode, norm, tradition, matter of course, rule, usage
    mannerism, quirk, characteristic gesture, characteristic, foible, trick
    accustomed to, used to, given to, habituated to, addicted to, no stranger to, not new to
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1informal An addictive practice, especially one of taking drugs.
      ‘a cocaine habit’
      • ‘For example, as a result of their lower overall economic status, many addicted women turn to prostitution as a means of supporting their drug habit.’
      • ‘Officers say most burglars are heroin or crack addicts who need cash to feed their drug habits.’
      • ‘A heroin and cocaine addict who preyed on elderly women to feed his drugs habit has been jailed for three years.’
      • ‘Even when the staff was accustomed to a very direct and friendly relationship with most clients, the work did not interfere in their drug habits or related lifeways.’
      • ‘I am at risk of robbery and muggings by people desperate to maintain their drug habit.’
      • ‘They can't control their addictions and habits.’
      • ‘It was a shock for Sherrie to find herself out on her own and with a drug habit.’
      • ‘Roof after roof has been entirely stripped of tiles - residents claim addicts have sold them to pay for their drug habit.’
      • ‘They heard from victims of crime undertaken to fund drug habits, families of drug addicts, former addicts, police and many of the organisation which exist to help addicts.’
      • ‘Or, as one parent put it, an addict is never cured of the drug habit, they are only in remission.’
      • ‘He was a former heroin addict who had stolen the televisions to fund his drug habit and to feed and clothe his family.’
      • ‘In undertaking crime to support their drug habits, cocaine and heroin abusers become likelier than usual to be arrested.’
      • ‘However, the overall use of the drug will endure for some time as a generation of drug users continues its habit.’
      • ‘It got to the stage were I was really desperate - shoplifting everyday, robbing all the time, selling drugs to fund my habit.’
      • ‘Now, years later, he had rediscovered his past habit after the drug related death of his addict father.’
      • ‘Most were young men, aged between 18 and 25, who were heroin and crack cocaine addicts funding habits through begging and crime.’
      • ‘Then there is the argument from the ill-informed that young people turn to crime to feed their drug habit.’
      • ‘A cocaine vaccine developed by a UK pharmaceutical company could help cocaine addicts kick their habit.’
      • ‘Do drug users commit property crimes to support their drug habits?’
      • ‘Burglary has traditionally been a quick and easy way for drug addicts to fund their habits.’
      addiction, dependence, dependency, craving, fixation, compulsion, obsession, weakness
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2Psychology An automatic reaction to a specific situation.
      • ‘In addition, psychotherapy can help patients learn new coping styles and interpersonal habits.’
      • ‘Recognizing abnormalities by viewing videotapes and improving speech habits with the help of a therapist are two effective methods of treatment.’
      • ‘Sleep organizes the memories of habits, actions, and skills learned during the day.’
      • ‘Temptation is the intensity of urges to engage in a specific habit in the midst of a difficult situation.’
      • ‘They take the place of habits until the new behaviors lose some of their unpleasantness and become more attractive in their own right.’
      • ‘The reason for this blinkered view is nothing other than the mere habit of thought.’
      • ‘‘This keeps us from being pulled into destructive or automatic habits and responses,’ says Segal.’
      • ‘To describe habits as automatic diminishes the force of the voluntary condition of the concept less than to state that they are mechanical.’
      • ‘As I reviewed the circumstances leading up to this event, I noticed how some of my habits made this situation worse than it needed to be.’
      • ‘A great deal of modern social and clinical psychology took shape through the study of food habits.’
      • ‘As Claire was fond of telling me, I had a habit of reducing every situation to the worst-case scenario.’
      • ‘You remind yourself that these thoughts are being generated out of a mental habit.’
      • ‘He believed the goal of education is to make useful habits automatic.’
      • ‘Certain situations, moods, habits, and memories can all be craving triggers, says psychotherapist Last.’
      • ‘Human health is heavily dependent on lifestyle habits and environmental conditions.’
      • ‘Second, will online technologies change poor lifestyle habits when other media efforts have failed?’
      • ‘Is it cognitive behavioral therapy, which reconfigures thinking patterns and habits?’
      • ‘Situational themes are specific habits and kinds of behavior that manifest character strengths in given situations.’
      • ‘It is a web of communication, a common language, and the acceptance of lack of language too, a knowledge of likes and dislikes, of habits and reactions, both physical and mental.’
      • ‘It also depends on the dog's behavioral habits and the owner's lifestyle.’
    3. 1.3 General shape or mode of growth, especially of a plant or a mineral.
      ‘a shrub of spreading habit’
      • ‘Plants that have a compact growth habit or those that adapt well to having their roots confined can be grown in containers almost indefinitely.’
      • ‘This results in a natural trailing growth habit that lets them cascade beautifully over the edges of their containers.’
      • ‘Because of their lanky growth habit, Japanese plums do best kept to an open or pyramidal frame.’
      • ‘Here are 10 herbs notable for their consistent, compact growth habit and strong flavor.’
      • ‘The plant grows upright with a slight spreading habit.’
      • ‘Further investigations of the effects of these changes in nutrient concentrations and growth habit is required to assess the implications on plant performance.’
      • ‘A sprawling growth habit is common throughout all varieties.’
      • ‘The ideal form for a particular tree depends not only on your preferences, but also on the plant's natural growth habit.’
      • ‘There are hundreds of varieties of very fragrant roses, and they come in every color, every growth habit and every classification.’
      • ‘Most have a rounded, spreading growth habit; some cultivars have weeping forms.’
      • ‘Proper pruning results from becoming familiar with the growth habit of a particular type.’
      • ‘Although described as of trailing or twining habit, my plants have grown upright, with neat stiff stems that need no support.’
      • ‘As a general rule, the more upright the growth habit of the plant, the more likely it is you will need to build something.’
      • ‘It has excellent fall color, and the plant habit is spreading and mounded.’
      • ‘The basis of our experiments was that growth habit of defoliated plants would affect how they compensated for lost leaf area.’
      • ‘The bushes have an aggressive growth habit and can easily reach a height of 6 feet.’
      • ‘It has beautiful purple flowers and appears to have a shrub-type growth habit.’
      • ‘Differences in morphology, growth habit, adult plant height, spike size, and development of spikes at nodes were observed.’
      • ‘Distance between camellia plants really depends on and will vary with growth habit of the species and cultivars you are planting.’
      • ‘Vegetables are judged on how quick they are to produce as well as on yield, taste, quality, plant habit and pest and disease resistance.’
  • 2A long, loose garment worn by a member of a religious order or congregation.

    • ‘The order dropped its habits after the Vatican II council and required that Ochoa wear a white outfit only during prayers at one of the members' homes.’
    • ‘On entry they were formally vested in a monastic habit, and wore a distinctive cap so that they were at once identifiable in the street.’
    • ‘Francis and the friars are costumed in simple gray habits (the chorus is dressed similarly).’
    • ‘Walking out of the nunnery was Sister Elizabeth, dressed in full habit, using a wooden cane to get down the sidewalk easier.’
    • ‘Standing on a parapet of fictive marble, dressed in the brown habit of his order, St Francis gazes intently at a wooden crucifix held between his crossed hands.’
    • ‘She has a lurid past of big yellow puffa skirts, fake orange tan and nun's habit dresses.’
    • ‘He donned the traditional brown Franciscan habit and sandals and took the name of his patron, St. Francis Solanus.’
    • ‘Because I wore the habit of a religious order he saw me as a sort of expert, one who could get results.’
    • ‘A label was developed for the easy, medium dry style of young white wine sold in inns throughout Germany which initially showed several nuns in brown habits against a bright blue sky.’
    • ‘He wore one of those long brown monk habits accented with beads and rope, and sported a Friar Tuck-like haircut - the bowl cut.’
    • ‘In his last decade in Rome he lived in a home run by the Blue Nuns, an Irish order so called because of the color of their habit.’
    1. 2.1
      short for riding habit
      • ‘The old lady's habit, formed of stiff brocade, gives her the appearance of a squat pyramid, with a grotesque head at the top of it.’
      • ‘They had already done their tests but were still in their dressage habit.’
      • ‘Because of the necessary fabrics to make habits hang correctly, I usually charge between $400-975 to create one.’
    2. 2.2archaic Dress; attire.
      • ‘The series in fact comprises only two: one in the form of a monk's habit and cowl, and one depicting a pin-striped business suit and tie.’
      • ‘The Sovereign was dressed in his traditional habit of silvery blue shirt and veil with a white long sleeveless tunic over top of white trousers.’
      • ‘They were clothed in the Dominican habit at a special Mass in the church which was attended by their family and friends.’
      • ‘He was dressed in his lordly habit, a black tunic over black trousers and a shimmering silver veil with matching wide sleeves.’
      garment, outfit, robe, costume, uniform, attire, dress, garb, clothes, clothing, garments
      View synonyms
  • 3archaic A person's bodily condition or constitution.

    ‘a victim to a consumptive habit’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]be habited
archaic
  • Dress; clothe.

    ‘a boy habited as a serving lad’
    • ‘She and her daughter, habited in their night clothes, had apparently been occupied in arranging some papers in the iron chest already mentioned, which had been wheeled into the middle of the room.’
    dressed, clothed, dressed up, fitted out, garbed, arrayed, decked out, turned out, tricked up, costumed
    View synonyms

Phrases

  • force of habit

    • The tendency for something done very frequently to become automatic.

      ‘he checks his appearance out of force of habit’
      • ‘I found myself, through force of habit, walking home after school to the Ginney Block, forgetting that I no longer lived there.’
      • ‘She will still be living in the area and says that she will still pop into the office from time to time for a coffee, and will, from force of habit, probably keep an eye on what's going on.’
      • ‘All the play was gone from her actions and she just did them now from force of habit.’
      • ‘Youngsters will take up new technology, but old dogs like me will continue to take their daily paper out of sheer force of habit.’
      • ‘I keep hitting the button by force of habit.’
      • ‘"I believe the biggest obstacles to an environmental tax shift are ignorance and force of habit," he says.’
      • ‘She's worked so many hours she can't see the road in front of her but keeps it all going out of force of habit and knowledge of her section of road.’
      • ‘I did keep looking at my watch, though—force of habit.’
      • ‘By force of habit I walked up the parade route, counter to the direction of the participants, until I reached the point where the bands convened to begin their march.’

Origin

Middle English: from Old French abit, habit, from Latin habitus ‘condition, appearance’, from habere ‘have, consist of’. The term originally meant ‘dress, attire’, later coming to denote physical or mental constitution.

Pronunciation

habit

/ˈhæbət//ˈhabət/