Definition of gyrate in English:

gyrate

verb

  • 1Move or cause to move in a circle or spiral, especially quickly.

    no object ‘their wings gyrate through the water like paddle wheels’
    • ‘Don't miss the rare chance of gyrating the turbulent waters of river beas on a spunky kyak.’
    • ‘Over the past few years, these so-called price-earnings ratios have gyrated wildly from this historical norm.’
    • ‘The capsule gyrated wildly through re-entry as it dragged the instrument module behind it.’
    • ‘It operates with a myriad of sensors that monitor steering wheel position, the forward and sideways movements of the car, whether the car is gyrating on its axis, and braking and wheel speed.’
    • ‘Some merchants offer suspended paper marionettes that in skilled hands can be made to dance and gyrate from the end of a string.’
    • ‘The circle becomes a spiralling tornado - spinning and gyrating to confuse the intruder.’
    • ‘It's music that you want to move to, with electric guitar riffs that twang and gyrate across the airwaves.’
    • ‘That's not wind on the water, it's gyrating whirligig beetles.’
    • ‘The Russian policy of recent weeks resembles the condition of latent hysteria - moving between extremes and gyrating between panic attacks and undefined hopes.’
    • ‘Stock markets around the world ended one of the darkest weeks in their history yesterday with a day of tumultuous trading as nervous dealers sent share prices gyrating wildly.’
    • ‘Stock prices are gyrating wildly often superimposed on small changes in earnings estimates.’
    • ‘A gyrating engine results in a misaligned propeller shaft.’
    • ‘Presidents in 1929 were not supposed to regulate Wall Street, or even talk about the gyrating market for fear of inadvertently setting off a panic.’
    • ‘I have a version from the early 30s, done in the style of music you associate with black and white cartoons full of barnyard animals gyrating up and down.’
    rotate, revolve, move in circles, go round in circles, circle, spiral, wheel round, turn round, whirl, pirouette, twirl, swirl, spin, swivel
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1no object Dance in a wild or suggestive manner.
      ‘strippers gyrated to rock music on a low stage’
      • ‘The cheerleader gyrated wildly before the screaming fans.’
      • ‘In the heat of the day the pool beckoned and the nights were spent in the pulsating disco gyrating with the local beautiful people.’
      • ‘There was loud disco music playing and two little girls with no boobies gyrating in a vaguely pornographic manner.’
      • ‘Amid the strobing lights and gyrating mass of bodies, she moved to the pulses and swirls in the music.’
      • ‘The way Perry gyrated and moved his booty on stage was incredible.’
      • ‘Among the hubbub of dance beats and gyrating bodies grew a feeling of discovery, of enthusiasm for something new.’
      • ‘The dance beat cranks, and the bodies continue to gyrate.’
      • ‘I helped her up and then she gyrated her hips, grabbed my hand, and moved to where the other people were dancing.’
      • ‘I was uncomfortable with the amount of sexually suggestive gyrating the dancers, and even the band, were making.’
      • ‘David swivels and gyrates to the point where I'm practically drooling with heavy duty lust.’
      • ‘Another was reported to have taken to the stage, removed his shirt and started to take his trousers off as he gyrated round a pole.’
      • ‘She spun, leapt, and gyrated, moving slowly enough for people to see, but quickly enough to amaze them.’
      • ‘Then he bent down and gyrated, dancing just for her.’
      • ‘I flicked my eyes to a random jock gyrating his hips in the most vulgar manner possible to the beat of the music.’
      • ‘He has become bored with watching cheap women dance and gyrate for his pleasure.’
      • ‘She often rocks, sways, twirls, jumps, climbs, leaps, gyrates and gets into upside-down positions.’
      • ‘She gyrates frenetically with an abandonment borne of pure intoxification, and scatters her money haphazardly over the stage.’
      • ‘She couldn't dance very well, but from the way everyone else was moving, all she would have to do was gyrate her hips, and she would be fine.’
      • ‘Vince asked the two, pretending not to notice the silicone-stuffed stripper gyrating inches in front of him.’
      • ‘She made her way to a platform in the middle of the court and gyrated suggestively in front of a wind machine.’

Origin

Early 19th century: earlier ( early 17th century) as gyration, from Latin gyrat- ‘revolved’, from the verb gyrare, from Greek guros ‘a ring’.

Pronunciation

gyrate

/ˈjīrāt//ˈdʒaɪreɪt/