Main definitions of gyp in US English:

: gyp1gyp2gyp3

gyp1

verb

[with object]informal
  • Cheat or swindle (someone)

    ‘that's salesmanship, you have to gyp people into buying stuff they don't like’
    • ‘It doesn't really satisfy, but you probably won't exit the theater feeling gypped.’
    • ‘So did you feel totally gypped when he admitted to cheating on his wife?’
    • ‘Later we made the corrections and gave each person a copy, so that they never thought that they'd been gypped.’
    • ‘We learned later, after a beautiful drive alongside the palm-lined Euphrates back to Baghdad that our guides had gypped us.’
    • ‘Lean on the handrails to support the majority of your body weight and gyp yourself out of the workout you deserve.’
    • ‘We felt gypped, cheated, enraged.’
    • ‘We are angrily awaiting him, because he gypped us last year.’
    • ‘While Eva is attracted to freedom of movement, she also associates a non-sedentary lifestyle with criminality, with ‘gypping’ folks of their accumulated possessions.’
    • ‘Observing the extent to which Trinidadians are gypped by large businesses and government offices makes me a vocal example of your assertion that the educated class is being lost to countries of the north Atlantic.’
    • ‘I just feel gypped, like I paid ten dollars for a chocolate bar from the ‘best place in town’, and then it turned out to be horrible.’
    • ‘People are going to come to get their money's worth, and then get gypped.’
    • ‘Because I swear that jerk has gypped Joanie and Dinah already this week!’
    • ‘And we are getting gypped every time contract negotiations come up.’
    • ‘Mom woke me up to give me a little broth (since my body has a habit of emptying its contents on an hourly basis, she gypped me of the good stuff).’
    • ‘You feel gypped when most bands play shorthanded, but not with this lot.’
    • ‘What was bothering me was the thought that my boss was acting in a punitive kind of way with intent to gyp me out of what I was entitled to for the purposes of saving money.’
    • ‘Jr. has got to be feeling awfully gypped these days.’
    • ‘Or perhaps you got gypped genetically, and earning prize-winning abs has been a losing battle.’
    • ‘In this manner I consumed this epic work within fifteen minutes and felt gypped.’
    • ‘I know they are a ripoff, and regardless of whether I liked the original or not, I feel gypped.’
    deceive, trick, dupe, outwit, fool, delude, cheat, take in, bluff, hoax, mislead, misguide, lead on, defraud, double-cross, swindle, gull, finagle, get the better of
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noun

informal
  • An act of cheating someone; a swindle.

    • ‘But to have a machete-wielding wild woman and a baseball bat-brandishing hero and to never once get a good look at their handiwork seems like a colossal gyp.’
    • ‘Which is a bit of a gyp, since * they * are the ones who put that spare tire there!’
    • ‘That also means I never actually turned into a four-foot dragon, which is kind of a gyp.’
    • ‘I'm a bit miffed because weblogging has done absolutely nothing for my sex life - what a gyp.’
    • ‘The boys simply praise their companions' qualities and unsentimentally lament their death, which in their cosmology was mainly just a big gyp.’
    stratagem, ploy, ruse, scheme, device, move, manoeuvre, contrivance, machination, expedient, artifice, wile, dodge
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Origin

Late 19th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

gyp

/dʒɪp//jip/

Main definitions of gyp in US English:

: gyp1gyp2gyp3

gyp2

(also gip)

noun

British
informal
  • Pain or discomfort.

    ‘one of her Achilles tendons had begun giving her gyp’
    • ‘My goodness but my joints are giving me gip today!’
    • ‘But I have arthritis, doctor, which has been giving me gyp for about a decade.’
    • ‘We'd just spent four hours traipsing around Taunton and, despite two stops for coffee and several rests, my back and legs were giving me gyp.’
    • ‘‘If I slightly twist the leg or I stand on a stone then it can give me gip,’ she said.’
    • ‘Running as if in diving boots, his back looked stiff and his shoulder appeared to be giving him gyp.’
    pain, aches and pains, soreness, tenderness, irritation, stiffness, malaise
    View synonyms

Origin

Late 19th century: perhaps from gee-up (see gee).

Pronunciation

gyp

/dʒɪp//jip/

Main definitions of gyp in US English:

: gyp1gyp2gyp3

gyp3

noun

British
  • A college servant at the Universities of Cambridge and Durham.

    • ‘I would get up early, leaving my room to be taken care of by a gyp who would even make my bed.’
    • ‘I can recollect, when I was a gyp at Cambridge, that the men used to have breakfast-parties for the very same purpose; and the exhibition of the morning acted infallibly upon the stomach, and caused the young students to eat with much voracity.’
    attendant, retainer
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 18th century: perhaps from obsolete gippo ‘menial kitchen servant’, originally denoting a man's short tunic, from obsolete French jupeau.

Pronunciation

gyp

/dʒɪp//jip/