Definition of guttural in US English:

guttural

adjective

  • 1(of a speech sound) produced in the throat; harsh-sounding.

    • ‘It starts off with three or four high-pitched peeps in rather quick succession; then the bird launches into a raspy, guttural shriek; and then the bird whistles a few warbling notes as a coda.’
    • ‘He spoke in a deep guttural voice and somewhat under his breath.’
    • ‘In its own harsh tones, almost guttural as if coming from a throat not designed with speech in mind, it spoke to him.’
    • ‘The voice was a low, guttural growl; the question was given as a command.’
    • ‘The whatever-it-was uttered something in a harsh, guttural language.’
    • ‘William leapt forward with a guttural growl, knocking one of the assassins back.’
    • ‘She saw Mac still sleeping soundly, making a barely audible guttural sound from his throat, she silently laughed at the thought that he has a slight snoring problem.’
    • ‘I no sooner cleared the tree line when I heard a deep guttural growl behind me.’
    • ‘Salman made a guttural noise, clearing his throat.’
    • ‘On the third, she pulled with all her might, small guttural noise escaping from her throat as she did.’
    • ‘He let out a guttural growl and then a groan when his cell phone rang.’
    • ‘I choke on the laughter, and out of my throat comes a harsh, guttural wail of despair.’
    • ‘Deep guttural growls came from the alleyway, as well as fearful whimpering.’
    • ‘And in 1995, the blind musician became the first American ever to compete in an unusual contest of multi-harmonic - and highly guttural - throat singing.’
    • ‘The auburn-haired boy warned with a guttural growl.’
    • ‘Harsh, guttural phrases echoed and rebounded around the hall as the two yelled furiously at one another, both at a far remove from the calm, efficient people they had met the previous day.’
    • ‘Abruptly, the creature's wild silvery eyes snapped open, and a guttural screech echoed from its throat, as it spread is massive feathered wings and stood.’
    • ‘It seemed the werewolf was on the verge of talking, but all that escaped its throat was a guttural growl.’
    • ‘He simply stood for half a second, a low, guttural cry escaping his burnt throat, before he ran.’
    • ‘He was only able to snap one photo when he heard a deep, guttural snort.’
    throaty, husky, gruff, gravelly, growly, growling, croaky, croaking, harsh, harsh-sounding, rough, rasping, raspy, grating, jarring
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 (of a manner of speech) characterized by the use of guttural sounds.
      ‘his parents' guttural central European accent’
      • ‘Though he couldn't understand the words, it sounded like more guttural then anything else he'd heard in his life.’
      • ‘He started chanting the incantation of a dark spell, full of ugly guttural sounds.’
      • ‘The low guttural syllables meant nothing to her, but the weary tone did.’
      • ‘After months of therapy, she recovered physically and could make guttural sounds.’
      • ‘As they moved off, a group of shadows detached themselves from the darkness and followed them, speaking in the guttural speech of Orc.’
      • ‘He had had various tics; he would make certain faces and guttural sounds when he was thinking, and they made these faces and sounds, too.’
      • ‘Sometimes it's just a grunt or two, a guttural sound akin to some sort of proto-speech.’
      • ‘His skin was dark and rough looking, he didn't seem as if he fit into the English world though his voice consisted of the soft R's and guttural sounds I've heard all my life.’
      • ‘It wasn't the piercing sound so popularly heard in Hollywood movies, but a loud guttural animal sound that froze the blood of everyone who heard it.’
      • ‘This is the story of violence, betrayal, love, and survival told in a series of monosyllabic guttural sounds, set against the backdrop of volcanic eruptions and pterodactyls.’
      • ‘From his appearance, you would expect a guttural tone, but his voice was deep and educated.’
      • ‘It's full of phonemes, guttural exclamations and limpid hisses.’
      • ‘Alex let the words to the song flow out of his mouth, the guttural German sound the last thing the people in audience expected.’
      • ‘One night someone came up to us talking in a guttural tone.’
      • ‘I am struck by owner Eddy's softly spoken Swedish, in contrast to the usual more guttural pronunciation.’
      • ‘The incorporation of guttural sounds and shouts appeared as honest and spontaneous reactions to his movement.’
      • ‘As students, they are grim-faced and punctuate their training with odd, guttural sounds, and as instructors they tend to be intensely rank-conscious and overbearing.’
      • ‘‘Roger that,’ Marshall said in his low, guttural throat mic tone.’
      • ‘The creature was obviously female, with a harsh, guttural growl to her speech.’
      • ‘His speech has the guttural accent of his native Germany.’

noun

  • A guttural consonant (e.g. k, g) or other speech sound.

    • ‘An obvious reason for this is that English, with all its Celtic gutturals and hard consonants, packs more of a punch when strung together compared to the more languid, Latin-based French.’
    • ‘I talked, while the light described its slow passage across the floor I talked, until my voice was hoarse and my throat felt raw from its fight with the Rris gutturals.’
    • ‘He held cloudy memories of a great city, tall houses rippling their reflections in rank canals; grubby gutturals and phlegmish dialects filled his head, and sometimes the clouds rolled away leaving a fine clear view.’
    • ‘You may find yourself drawn to the wide and windswept gutturals of Russian, for example, or Polish.’
    • ‘They have just a few gutturals that they repeat and repeat.’

Origin

Late 16th century: from French, or from medieval Latin gutturalis, from Latin guttur ‘throat’.

Pronunciation

guttural

/ˈɡədərəl//ˈɡədərəl/