Definition of gutter press in English:

gutter press

noun

the gutter press
British
  • Reporters or newspapers engaging in sensational journalism, especially accounts of the private lives of public figures.

    • ‘The target of the campaign is not to investigate but to provide fodder for the gutter press.’
    • ‘At the same time as he has been seen endorsing products and promoting good causes, his sudden international fame has also set him up as a target for the gutter press.’
    • ‘He gave a short bitter press conference and blamed the gutter press for his downfall.’
    • ‘If this was the best the gutter press could come up with, allies avowed, then he really was home and dry.’
    • ‘It is as if the gutter press are chastising him for leaving native shores.’
    • ‘One moment one's joshing with a jolly foreign chap about good old Eddie's mater and pater, the next one's every snigger is plastered across the front of the gutter press.’
    • ‘The government immigration policy and the gutter press have created an atmosphere in our society that says forced deportation is acceptable and necessary.’
    • ‘This from a woman who when last seen in the gutter press was strapped to the wings of an airborne plane.’
    • ‘There was a time when the nonsense that passes for news could be passed off as the ravings of the gutter press.’
    • ‘He was never an outstanding player, never one to generate much headlines in the tabloid gutter press, but what he did, he did outstandingly.’
    • ‘Thankfully, the gutter press never succeeded in finding the angle they wanted.’
    • ‘The political party, however, has been able to tap into disillusion in some areas, taking advantage of the disgusting anti-refugee bilge pumped out by the gutter press.’
    • ‘Shame on those who have attempted, through their friends in the gutter press, to spoil what really has been a success story, one which is a good example to any of today's youngsters who are trying to mend their ways after a skirmish with crime.’
    • ‘To the dismay of the gutter press, that unholy union lasted only a few front pages.’
    • ‘If I wish to read propaganda like this, I can avail myself of the gutter press!’
    • ‘The success of the gutter press is offputting for many of those candidates possessing the most desirable of political attributes.’
    • ‘With his arrest, the gutter press reeled off the usual headlines.’
    • ‘If we do not, the gutter press will continue to try to deflect that bitterness onto asylum seekers and other minorities.’
    • ‘Yet I have never met one of these lazy, scrounging refugees popularised in the gutter press.’
    • ‘A lot of people have been jabbering about him, what with the revelations about him splashed across the gutter press this weekend.’

Pronunciation:

gutter press

/ˈɡədər ˈˌpres/