Main definitions of gull in English

: gull1gull2

gull1

noun

  • A long-winged, web-footed seabird with a raucous call, typically having white plumage with a gray or black mantle.

    • ‘It is particularly known for its diversity of gulls and sea ducks.’
    • ‘Among some ground-nesting waterbirds, such as gulls and plovers, research has shown that speckling aids egg camouflage.’
    • ‘Besides a few gulls and black ducks, we had the place to ourselves.’
    • ‘The waters surrounding Pigeon Island offer great fishing for sea birds including gulls, terns and the brown booby.’
    • ‘Seabirds such as gulls and terns, even pelicans, can point the way to ‘sure thing’ action when the excited flocks are low and tight, dipping and circling.’
    • ‘The body coloration is typical of gull plumage from above, but both breeding and non-breeding adults have dark underwings with pale wingtips, which are distinctive in flight.’
    • ‘A variety of birds make their homes around the harbour including yellow eyed and blue penguins, black back gulls, and five types of cormorants.’
    • ‘This gull has narrow wings, a slender, black, pin-like bill, and pink legs.’
    • ‘In some ways, there are breeds of gull and sea bird who are light years ahead of us on the long-term commitment front and don't seem to have the same issues that we do.’
    • ‘Many shorebirds and seabirds are found here, including rhinoceros auklet, Brandt's cormorants, and all manner of gulls, puffins, petrels, murres, and more.’
    • ‘I could go on and on about the many herons, egrets, gulls, terns, and various and sundry other species we spotted yesterday.’
    • ‘Each occasion a large gull or carrion crow passed overhead, the buntings took all wing, providing a most impressive spectacle.’
    • ‘Carrion crows, large gulls, hawks and herons all receive severe punishment.’
    • ‘A pelagic gull, this kittiwake spends most of the year at sea.’
    • ‘For some seabirds, predation by gulls on host eggs or chicks may impose a more significant limitation on reproductive success and that has resulted in culling programs at several seabird colonies.’
    • ‘The Northern Fulmar varies in color from mostly white, to gray and white like many gulls, to an overall gray-brown, with every possible shade in between.’
    • ‘This change might affect the migration and reproductive ecology of the ivory gull and other seabirds in the High Arctic.’
    • ‘The Thayer's Gull is a large gull, with typical gull-like plumage.’
    • ‘This gull has a slate-gray back, a white belly and tail, and black wingtips.’
    • ‘It houses Manx shearwaters, herring and black-backed gulls, razorbills, stormy petrels and guillemots besides puffins.’

Origin

Late Middle English: of Celtic origin; related to Welsh gwylan and Breton gwelan.

Pronunciation

gull

/ɡəl/

Main definitions of gull in English

: gull1gull2

gull2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Fool or deceive (someone)

    ‘workers had been gulled into inflicting poverty and deprivation upon themselves’
    • ‘The people have been lulled and gulled into complacency.’
    • ‘If racists decide to, say, murder an Asian man in Nottingham, they were gulled into it by ‘constant and violent imprecations against the British government’.’
    • ‘They confide in each other, they mutually admire, bitch, dish the dirt and reminisce in such a delightful way that the audience is gulled into believing this is a comedy of manners, albeit manners of New Yorkers.’
    • ‘To understand ground rents and land prices is to understand cities; not to understand is to remain mired forever in confusion and fallacy, to be gulled and misled and bamboozled, which is, indeed and alas, the common lot of mankind.’
    • ‘It is so easy to be seduced by the ephemeral polls and gulled by endorsements and fund-raising statistics.’
    • ‘He wants us to believe that we have been gulled into seeing the rebirth of Scottish painting as something more than it really was.’
    • ‘Obviously, it appeared to him, they were all fools here and would be easily gulled.’
    • ‘The release of 50-year-old secret papers detailing the way they were gulled into taking part in nuclear and biological warfare tests has, if anything, aggravated resentment over the non-issue of a national service medal.’
    • ‘That's because the man that gulled him has a very, very long line of creditors.’
    • ‘They are gulled by the oldest trick of all, the one that gets the victim to look somewhere else.’
    • ‘They have gulled municipalities around the world into letting them stage their pranks, and the result is celebrity and riches.’
    • ‘People do not like to admit that they have been gulled or conned, so a vested interest in the myth was permitted to arise, and a lazy media never bothered to ask any follow-up questions.’
    • ‘The defense is for us all, but scientists in particular, to be aware of what's going on and not be gulled by the claims to greater efficiency made by private enterprise, which on close examination usually come down to presentation.’
    • ‘In this case, the public, if not the sponsors, have been gulled.’
    • ‘He offers a timely reminder that we should not be gulled into believing that everything done against ‘terrorism’ is done for humanity.’
    • ‘Practitioners of this technique have before my eyes gulled bosses into taking the opportunity of an annual performance review to offer them a raise and their daughter's virtue.’
    • ‘Maori have been gulled into being part of the process by which busybodies and newly-minted planners impose their ideas of how property should be used, on the people who actually wear the costs.’
    • ‘Unlike many writers in this field, Kunstler is never gulled into praising projects and programs that have good intentions but dubious results.’
    • ‘There will be so few jobs available that many foolish young men and women will be gulled into becoming their own families' jailers and murderers.’
    • ‘Americans too easily let themselves be gulled by the preachments of their leaders in wartime.’
    swindle, defraud, cheat, trick, hoodwink, hoax, dupe, take in, mislead, delude, fool, outwit, misguide, lead on, inveigle, seduce, ensnare, entrap, beguile, double-cross
    View synonyms

noun

  • A person who is fooled or deceived.

    • ‘Dauphine echoes the initial warning of the second prologue in describing the ways in which the gulls are duped.’
    • ‘The title of this piece might seem to be no more than a comment on the ease with which the flats, mugs, suckers, punters, marks, gulls, or coneys could be relieved of their money.’

Origin

Late 16th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

gull

/ɡəl/