Definition of grudge in English:

grudge

noun

  • A persistent feeling of ill will or resentment resulting from a past insult or injury.

    ‘she held a grudge against her former boss’
    • ‘They intend to interview friends, former colleagues, ex-girlfriends, even former classmates - anyone who may have held a grudge against him.’
    • ‘There is no point bearing grudges if you want to do well.’
    • ‘Do you have a longstanding grudge against a relative?’
    • ‘I'll only harbour a grudge against you for the rest of my life.’
    • ‘Is it spontaneous, promulgated by a third party, or the result of a growing, longstanding grudge?’
    • ‘Balancing George's long-held grudges, however, was his tenacious loyalty.’
    • ‘For example, one might carry a grudge or feelings of guilt for years.’
    • ‘She had fallen in love, and he had harbored a grudge ever since.’
    • ‘"No sense in holding grudges, " Lucy replied.’
    • ‘We simply have more important business to attend to right now than nursing an old grudge.’
    • ‘I have also learned that journalists hold grudges far longer and over a lot less than studio executives.’
    • ‘He held a grudge against me, and so he made up lies to slander me.’
    • ‘We draw up alliances with loyalties thicker than blood and we nurse old grudges with photographic memories.’
    • ‘Maybe we have old grudges that darken our perspective.’
    • ‘"It turned out that she had a petty grudge against both of us.’
    • ‘Sources later explained that he was thought to be harbouring a grudge against the Prime Minister.’
    • ‘The difference between nursing a grudge and committing to a war should be obvious.’
    • ‘Boy, these guys sure do bear a grudge, don't they?’
    • ‘I tend to hold personal, self-deprecating grudges for a bit.’
    • ‘Elephants are renowned for their long memories and are not unknown to bear grudges.’
    grievance
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Be resentfully unwilling to give, grant, or allow (something)

    ‘he grudged the work and time that the meeting involved’
    • ‘A simple man, Ramesh does not grudge cricketers getting all mileage.’
    • ‘Until such a time, we cannot grudge women demanding separate bus seats or special attention in queues.’
    • ‘We wouldn't grudge judicial quickness in headline-grabbing cases if it weren't for the appalling figures our justice system throws up again and again.’
    • ‘There is no reason to grudge the fact that the rain nearly spoiled the Onam celebrations.’
    • ‘The only dissenting voice was Henry's son William, who grudged the loss to the estate of a prime field.’
    • ‘After 83 minutes they had finally given an inch, grudging it to Ireland with all their hearts.’
    • ‘Maximising profit is in the nature of the animal, and if we want democratic choice, we cannot grudge commercial media exercising theirs.’
    • ‘Some grudge it because it stands on the way of their goal.’
    • ‘When money ran out, they were the only ones working on their land not grudging their son's indulgence in the newfound joys of matrimony.’
    • ‘No one can deny Naipaul's writing skill or grudge this award for a lifetime of literary hard work.’
    • ‘I tell thee, thou foolish philanthropist, that I grudge the dollar, the dime, the cent, I give to such men as do not belong to me and to whom I do not belong.’
    begrudge, resent, feel aggrieved about, feel bitter about, be annoyed about, be angry about, be displeased about, be resentful of, mind, object to, take exception to, regret
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    1. 1.1with two objects , usually with negative Feel resentful that (someone) has achieved (something)
      ‘I don't grudge him his moment of triumph’
      • ‘Who's going to grudge a pensioner such a silly thing?’
      • ‘For the hosts, the result yielded a narrow defeat bonus point, scant reward for a spirited effort in the final quarter that almost gave them a surprise win that few could have grudged them.’
      • ‘The Hearts players have performed admirably during this season in trying circumstances, so it is hard to grudge them their qualified success.’
      • ‘But this is your last chance to preach to me, so I wouldn't grudge you the taking advantage of it.’
      • ‘I don't grudge them their breakfast, nor their liking for the sun, and certainly not the smiling.’
      • ‘Not that one grudges the great player any of that adulation.’
      • ‘Mind you, it helps that you don't grudge me a few of your goldfish.’
      • ‘For them to have complete belonging to this country may not be fully possible and we should not grudge them that.’
      • ‘But while he peppered his press conferences with the odd spell of self-flagellation, claiming he was being selfish, few will grudge him his opportunity.’
      • ‘I don't grudge anyone their share of designer labels - wear 'em if it makes you feel good.’
      • ‘I didn't grudge him the time with his boyfriend, because he was so damn happy.’
      • ‘I mean, I grudge nobody an honest living, but can they still be going?’
      • ‘It seems like everyone in this family grudges me any fun in my life.’
      • ‘I don't grudge him it but he pays more in tax than I was being offered.’
      • ‘Sometimes they'll peck at a particularly luscious flower or leaf, too, but there's enough there and to spare so I don't grudge them their dietary needs.’
      • ‘Not that I'd really have grudged him a snack, you understand, but I'm rather fond of the little baby frogs and heaven knows they have enough trouble making it into adulthood as it is.’
      • ‘And who could grudge her the comfort of a family just the other side of a common wall?’
      • ‘Nobody in India grudges them their pride and identity as being Muslims, first and foremost.’
      • ‘Ah well, I don't grudge her that moment of bitter victory.’
      • ‘I ain't grudging them their airtime.’
      envy, begrudge, resent, mind
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Phrases

  • bear someone a grudge (also bear a grudge)

    • Maintain a feeling of ill will or resentment toward someone.

      ‘I hope you will not bear me a grudge’
      ‘perhaps Maria bears a grudge against him for that very reason’

Origin

Late Middle English: variant of obsolete grutch ‘complain, murmur, grumble’, from Old French grouchier, of unknown origin. Compare with grouch.

Pronunciation

grudge

/ɡrədʒ//ɡrəj/