Definition of grit in English:

grit

noun

  • 1Small loose particles of stone or sand.

    ‘she had a bit of grit in her eye’
    • ‘Clean the cockles or clams by soaking them in cold water for at least 30 minutes to remove any sand or grit.’
    • ‘He was very dirty, his entire body seemingly coated with dust and grit.’
    • ‘Marie said: ‘It seems as if the water has washed away all of the sand and grit beneath the road.’’
    • ‘He further went on to explain that one of the most common eye injuries results from sand and grit entering the eye whilst playing a bunker shot.’
    • ‘Wash them well in fresh, clear water to remove any grit or insects.’
    • ‘Metal parts get attacked by salt and lots and lots of sand and grit.’
    • ‘Use an appropriate scraper to remove all loose paint and grit.’
    • ‘How many times have you got a small piece of grit in your eye?’
    • ‘During the course of your fishing session your line will pick up small bits of grit, sand and algae.’
    • ‘He swallowed dust and grit and a bit of his back tooth.’
    • ‘Wash the leeks thoroughly to remove grit, then chop or slice as preferred.’
    • ‘You may feel like you have sand or grit in your eye, and your eye may look red.’
    • ‘When it rains heavily all the grit on the roads tends to be washed away.’
    • ‘We clung to a wire fence while wind-blown sand stung our faces and we tried to keep grit and dust out of our eyes.’
    • ‘Bulbs need to be planted at about twice their depth in soil that has a bit of added grit to stop waterlogging.’
    • ‘Dust and grit may be especially hazardous to people who wear contact lenses.’
    • ‘The agreements include all gravel lorries being covered to reduce dust and grit, and a ban on lorry movements when pupils are entering and leaving schools in Cressing Road, Witham.’
    • ‘As the cracks widen, sand, grit, and small rocks from the overlying rubble trickle down into the fractures.’
    • ‘There was a guy who used to carry his bicycle up to the third floor and pick all the bits of grit out of the tyres and chuck them down the stairs.’
    • ‘He said a van full of sand and grit had to be used to soak up the orange juice which had spilled on to the motorway.’
    gravel, pebbles, stones, shingle, sand, dust, dirt
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    1. 1.1as modifier (with numeral) indicating the grade of fineness of an abrasive.
      ‘220-grit paper’
      • ‘Use a sanding block with 100 to 120 grit sandpaper for smaller areas.’
      • ‘Sand all corners very lightly with a sanding block and 150 - grit sandpaper.’
      • ‘I applied two light layers of primer sanding after each one with 600 grit wet/dry sandpaper.’
      • ‘A disk grinder with a 30 grit sanding disk works well for removing rubber.’
      • ‘Using 220 - grit sandpaper, lightly sand all the surfaces of the door and frames.’
    2. 1.2 A coarse sandstone.
      ‘layers of impervious shales and grits’
      • ‘The path leads straight to the sombre gritstone memorial on the edge of the moorland spur.’
      • ‘We passed the Flying Dutchman, chugged up the lane out of town and on to a bridleway, a nice route of beech and oak and large mossy boulders of gritstone.’
      • ‘Walls will be crafted in Yorkshire gritstone and there will be wildflower meadows, a bridge, lockkeeper's cottage, fisherman, and even dirty water in the stretch of canal.’
      • ‘Most carved stones are flat-topped outcrops of the local millstone grit.’
      • ‘I skulked down the sunken path out of the village, down past the rough grit walls and rough pastures that are everywhere.’
      • ‘What we didn't expect was to find the thing perched on a weather-sculpted and bus-sized block of gritstone.’
      • ‘The War Memorial Obelisk stands about 20 foot high on an outcrop of gritstone and is brilliantly situated.’
      • ‘The geology here is alternating layers of limestone and shale topped with millstone grit.’
      • ‘There is a condition restricting the output of gritstone from the Old Hutton quarry each day to 400 tonnes.’
      • ‘By now we had reached 1,300 foot and had one last steep slope to climb, for which there's a diagonal sunken path leading up to bilberrys, they indicate acid soil and here that's because of a cap layer of gritstone rock.’
      • ‘Our finest gritstone architecture is being devoured by road salt.’
      • ‘The warehouse has a flat tar roof which is made up of a grainy limestone grit which is covered by a cohesive material.’
      • ‘The immediate terrain is straightforward - large sheep pastures with gritstone walls.’
      • ‘They were to be created from local limestone, sandstone and gritstone and each cairn was to feature a spiral design of dry stone walls emanating outwards.’
      • ‘One or two gritstone quarries provide important nesting sites for peregrines and ravens.’
      • ‘Tough layers of sandstone and gritstone cap the hills and moors.’
      • ‘Not all rock is the same, and gritstone is like no other.’
      • ‘Work has involved replacing the original limestone steps with gritstone that will be less slippery.’
      • ‘Five years ago, he formed a company to buy the complex of gritstone buildings dating from 1790.’
      • ‘This airy but demanding ridge walk is mainly in Cheshire, following the gritstone ridge with some excellent views.’
  • 2Courage and resolve; strength of character.

    ‘he displayed the true grit of the navy pilot’
    • ‘I truly believe that if you can adapt to adversity and develop true grit, you can still succeed.’
    • ‘I have seldom seen such grit, determination and resoluteness from everyone on a Waterford team.’
    • ‘The crew is rising to every little challenge they are given and conquering them all with true grit and sheer determination.’
    • ‘These buildings are part of what we are as Yorkshire people, they are visible expressions of our grit, determination and resolve.’
    • ‘They displayed a grit and a willingness for the physical side of the game so often missing in the past.’
    • ‘Our backs were truly against the wall and finally some of the true grit and character that has been lying dormant for too long came flooding through.’
    • ‘But Jean showed her true grit and followed the first rule of business which is to learn from your failures.’
    • ‘At a time when economic growth is slowing down and public finances are worsening, this survey illustrates the true grit of the north when it comes to determination to succeed.’
    • ‘Here's a woman who through sheer grit has created a billion dollar empire.’
    • ‘And yet again they displayed grit, guts and determination after falling behind in a mere 21 seconds.’
    • ‘He showed true grit as he completed the 4.3-mile run in 55 minutes in spite of suffering from prostate cancer.’
    • ‘What Mark has achieved he has done with pure grit and determination, tenacity and hard work.’
    • ‘With home games against sides they have the ability to beat and away games against sides they have already beaten, it is now all about true grit and determination.’
    • ‘Showing true grit, he went on to ride the bull for eight seconds and seal the title.’
    • ‘It is times like these that show the true grit of a team.’
    • ‘It would have been no more than they deserved as they showed true grit after the dreadful start and the concession of those two early goals.’
    • ‘Despite their desperate position however, the Kildare girls showed their true grit and finished with a flourish.’
    • ‘But our boys showed true grit, managing to force the game into extra time with a well-taken goal from Parkin on 80 minutes.’
    • ‘This woman had strength and grit and determination.’
    • ‘But in a demonstration of the true grit of the fell runner, he managed to carry on.’
    courage, courageousness, bravery, pluck, mettle, mettlesomeness, backbone, spirit, strength of character, strength of will, moral fibre, steel, nerve, gameness, valour, fortitude, toughness, hardiness, resolve, determination, resolution
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • no object Move with or make a grating sound.

    ‘fine red dust that gritted between the teeth’
    • ‘At least a third of the desert's sand was in my mouth gritting between my teeth.’
    • ‘I did not expect a travel story so real that I could almost feel the dust gritting between my teeth.’
    • ‘Sand gritted in your teeth with every bite of food and rasped the eyeballs each time you blinked your eyes.’
    clench, clamp together, press together, shut tightly
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Phrases

  • grit one's teeth

    • 1Clench one's teeth, especially when angry or faced with something unpleasant.

      ‘grit your teeth and splash yourself with cold water!’
      • ‘Yes, we had to grit our teeth and swallow our pride, but in the end it was a win for everyone.’
      • ‘I was too close to do anything about it so we gritted our teeth and waited for the impact.’
      • ‘It's odd, saying the word ‘rambunctious’ makes her grit her teeth even to this day.’
      • ‘But I just grit my teeth and muddle through to the next topic which catches my mind's eye.’
      • ‘The queue has already reached the back door but we grit our teeth, put on our jackets and join it.’
      • ‘He clenched his fists and gritted his teeth as he strode through the hall of the large hospital.’
      • ‘My friend, who continued to grit her teeth with every bump, couldn't believe what she was seeing.’
      • ‘Just grit your teeth and walk on, that way things are much easier.’
      • ‘He gritted his teeth, clenched his jaw, and tried to shut everything around him out.’
      • ‘All I can say is: grit your teeth, clench your fists, be prepared… for lots of bad stuff.’
      clench, clamp together, press together, shut tightly
      View synonyms
      1. 1.1Keep one's resolve in a difficult situation.
        ‘Congress must grit its teeth and take action’
        • ‘I'm sure nobody believed us, but we stuck with it, gritted our teeth, and refused to contemplate the idea of failure.’
        • ‘Despite the huge losses, Granada have gritted their teeth and stumped up an extra £25m to invest in its programme schedule, on top of £750m already earmarked.’
        • ‘And, we decided to grit our teeth and try to cope with the various problems that arise due to group trips.’
        • ‘It was a huge shock to herself and to her loving family, but the brave and determined 57 year old gritted her teeth and got on with life.’
        • ‘These are the times when we know we must change ‘or else,’ so we grit our teeth and do what we must.’
        • ‘You just have to grit your teeth and keep going.’
        • ‘Consequently, he says, there were places where he had to grit his teeth and take editorial decisions.’
        • ‘Well, since the editor of the magazine had incurred costs, I felt morally obliged to help him out, so I gritted my teeth and revised the article.’
        • ‘Why on earth should she grit her teeth and become a drudge for an industry she didn't respect?’
        • ‘So tonight I gritted my teeth, rolled up my sleeves, and washed her.’

Origin

Old English grēot ‘sand, gravel’, of Germanic origin; related to German Griess, also to groats.

Pronunciation

grit

/ɡrɪt//ɡrit/