Definition of gregarious in US English:

gregarious

adjective

  • 1(of a person) fond of company; sociable.

    ‘he was a popular and gregarious man’
    • ‘Despite his gregarious nature, and being famed for his generous hospitality - his New Year's Eve parties are legendary - he lives alone in London.’
    • ‘Rose is outgoing and gregarious; he remembers names easily and thrives in social situations.’
    • ‘He's actually a lot more gregarious and outgoing than most people i knew at that age- and more willing to talk to people who are not at all like him.’
    • ‘I'm gregarious up to a point and then I have to have total solitude for at least two days.’
    • ‘Sociable, friendly and gregarious, Beatrice enjoyed the social life provided in her parish in London and made many friends.’
    • ‘Being in the public eye doesn't necessarily mean you're gregarious.’
    • ‘He was known throughout the region as a hospitable and gregarious host.’
    • ‘Although most people characterise O'Kane as extremely sociable and gregarious, he is also described as ‘a workaholic’.’
    • ‘I am a fairly gregarious person, but I am quite comfortable in my own company.’
    • ‘However, Nick, a gregarious chap, had young friends who were in the hospitality industry who suggested that being a hotelier would be more to his liking.’
    • ‘But it is worth exploring - Gambians are gregarious and hospitable people, and the smiles and greetings offered to foreigners are completely genuine.’
    • ‘Richard was a gregarious person and he thought Edinburgh was the most perfect place because you could party 24 hours a day.’
    • ‘He is naturally gregarious, and the work obviously suits him.’
    • ‘These are by and large a generous, friendly and gregarious bunch.’
    • ‘He was always a gregarious and sociable person and loved to set up opportunities for people from all walks of life to come together.’
    • ‘He's gregarious and tactile, always ready with a cuddle and a chuckle.’
    • ‘He was gregarious, delighting in conversation, good food, wine, and, of course, malt whisky.’
    • ‘Even though she was so gregarious and loved to chat, she also liked to listen.’
    • ‘For example, although she was gregarious, she avoided social gatherings in which there was too much gossip, observing that such conversation was at best unhelpful.’
    • ‘I'm reasonably happy with my own company, but I'm naturally gregarious so I think that three months would be my limit on the island.’
    sociable, social, company-loving, companionable, convivial, clubbable
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    1. 1.1 (of animals) living in flocks or loosely organized communities.
      ‘gregarious species forage in flocks from colonies or roosts’
      • ‘Western Grebes are highly gregarious in all seasons, wintering in large flocks and nesting in colonies.’
      • ‘They are fairly gregarious, but will sometimes gather in groups separate from the other rock shorebirds.’
      • ‘During the winter, they are gregarious, feeding in small groups.’
      • ‘Although they are frequently found in pairs, broadbills also tend to be quite gregarious and are often found in small feeding flocks.’
      • ‘Locusts can exist in two different behavioral states, solitary and gregarious, whereas grasshoppers generally do not.’
      • ‘Snowy Plovers breed in loose colonies, and they are gregarious in winter.’
      • ‘American White Pelicans are highly gregarious and breed in large, dense colonies.’
      • ‘Many of these raptor species are gregarious, which accounts for impressively large flocks of impressively large birds.’
      • ‘The social system of pikas varies considerably among species, ranging from solitary individuals to large, gregarious colonies.’
      • ‘Old World sparrows are highly gregarious; they often roost and breed communally and form feeding flocks.’
      • ‘Eared Grebes are typically gregarious in nesting season, living in colonies that sometimes number thousands of individuals.’
      • ‘Gray Jays are gregarious and are often found in family groups.’
      • ‘Black-crowned Night-herons are gregarious at all times of the year, and are often seen in very large groups.’
      • ‘Caspian Terns are less gregarious than other terns, nesting in smaller colonies, although this is changing in Washington.’
      • ‘Rheas are gregarious in habit, and tend to live in flocks ranging in size from 5-30 individuals.’
      • ‘Other evidence, though, suggests tyrannosaurs were gregarious.’
      • ‘They are more gregarious during the spawning season when they congregate in large groups.’
      • ‘They are gregarious throughout the year, with the exception of the laying and incubation period.’
      • ‘Some pipits and wagtails are solitary, and others are gregarious.’
      • ‘Common hippos are gregarious, live in herds, and are well adapted to life in the water.’
      social, organized, living in flocks, living in herds, living in shoals
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    2. 1.2 (of plants) growing in open clusters or in pure associations.
      • ‘If you are planting them in a container, don't skimp with the bulbs - Agapanthus is a gregarious flower that likes to be crowded.’
      • ‘It is a gregarious spreading herb that quickly covers the ground and rocks.’
      • ‘Ocencyrtus johnsonii is both gregarious and engages in superparasitism.’
      • ‘The last gregarious flowering of muli bamboo in Mizoram, Tripura, Manipur and Barak Valley of Assam was reported in 1958-59 and was followed by famine in those areas.’
      • ‘In the Western Ghats, at an altitude of about 1,600 metres, in the region of sholas and grasslands, the kurinji flourishes as a gregarious shrub.’

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Latin gregarius (from grex, greg- ‘a flock’) + -ous.

Pronunciation

gregarious

/ɡrəˈɡɛriəs//ɡrəˈɡerēəs/