Definition of grandstand in English:

grandstand

noun

  • The main seating area, usually roofed, commanding the best view for spectators at racetracks or sports stadiums.

    • ‘Spectators benefit from a newly-installed grandstand and large screen.’
    • ‘The second floor of the grandstand will house the primary horse racing and betting areas, but will add a restaurant and patio to provide improved seating and a better view of the races.’
    • ‘Just after 3.30 pm spectators stood shoulder to shoulder in the grandstands to cheer home their horse.’
    • ‘We're sold out in the main public enclosures for Thursday and sold out in the grandstand on Friday.’
    • ‘The sight could hardly have been more ominous and the packed grandstands were beginning to fear the worst.’
    • ‘The two grandstands frame the pitch in symmetrical tiers of seating, but are expressed in quite different ways.’
    • ‘The flags are flying proudly at York Racecourse after a new grandstand was officially handed over to race chiefs.’
    • ‘At that time, women were very restricted in their involvement in racing and Mrs Widdis was unable to be in the Members enclosure, so she was standing in the grandstand with one of her daughters, cheering her horse on.’
    • ‘The gleaming new pit complex and control tower along with grandstands and hospitality units has transformed Mondello into a venue of which Irish motorsport can feel justifiably proud.’
    • ‘View a few races from the stands, then check out the infield area, accessible through a tunnel from the grandstand and open to all.’
    • ‘He was also against the replacement of a grassed viewing area in front of the main grandstand with concrete.’
    • ‘At almost every race on the calendar, more than 120,000 spectators cram into the grandstands, all vying for a view of the millionaire superstar drivers.’
    • ‘The best crowd of the season packed the grandstands for Sunday's eliminations.’
    • ‘They filled an entire section of the grandstand opposite the Williams pit garage, cheered wildly and waved flags and yelled every time Montoya made an appearance.’
    • ‘Ascot hopes to create one of the world's most modern racecourses, with a new grandstand, track and parade ring.’
    • ‘The next time the F1 testing rolls around to Silverstone try and go there… it is almost like seeing a race from the grandstands, bar the overtaking (which is minimal nowadays anyway).’
    • ‘The new grandstand will hold 10, 875 racegoers if permission is granted.’
    • ‘The old entrance next to the grandstand has been replaced by a new restaurant which has splendid views of the members' lawn and the horsewalk which connects parade ring and track.’
    • ‘In recent weeks a series of grandstands and marquee tents have been assembled on the airfield, and signs have been going up awaiting the thousands of visitors who will descend on the event.’
    • ‘The grandstand's terracing now provides more space for spectators to view the racing.’

verb

[NO OBJECT]derogatory
  • Seek to attract applause or favorable attention from spectators or the media.

    ‘they accused him of political grandstanding’
    • ‘We see grandstanding, bullying, and a lot of time-wasting and puffed-up importance, signifying nothing.’
    • ‘If you paid a little more attention to fact rather than grandstanding, you'd know these things.’
    • ‘To some in the press box, it is calculated grandstanding.’
    • ‘For what it's worth, Tim ignores the media grandstanding and gets to the very heart of the issue.’
    • ‘Members spent their time grandstanding for the TV cameras and scoring partisan points.’

Pronunciation:

grandstand

/ˈɡran(d)ˌstand/