Definition of grace in English:

grace

noun

  • 1Simple elegance or refinement of movement.

    ‘she moved through the water with effortless grace’
    • ‘He danced marvelously with grace, elegance and form.’
    • ‘She was 5'7, slim and wiry, with a dancer's slow, precise grace in her movements.’
    • ‘Two ladies strolled out, walking with perfect elegance and grace.’
    • ‘I do the first couple of movements with grace and ease… but then I forget.’
    • ‘It wasn't exactly a movement of grace but I really didn't care.’
    • ‘Thirty years of relentless training and performance have given him total grace and fluidity of movement.’
    • ‘In plain leotards six dancers brought the discordant music and bare stage to life with their precise, agile movement and amazing grace on a centre stage trapeze.’
    • ‘The battlecruisers' movements lost their grace, and they fired with far less precision.’
    • ‘Her mother, Bo, was a beauty pageant winner in Korea, and as you watch her daughter on the course you have a sense that she has inherited some of the same elegance and grace.’
    • ‘She moved with such grace following my every movement.’
    • ‘They have beauty on their side, they also have grace and elegance.’
    • ‘Even against such odds, she had not given up; she fought without skill or training, but her movements spoke of grace and control.’
    • ‘Nothing on this earth could match their fast movements and grace.’
    • ‘Training imparts a sort of grace to their movements and timbre in their voice.’
    • ‘Sweat was dripping down our faces by this time, but we had to keep our smiles planted on our face and an ease and grace in our movements.’
    • ‘I generally perform with all the elegance and grace of a hippopotamus.’
    • ‘Ultimate grace and effortless precision combine into a vision of someone floating on a cloud.’
    • ‘Because of the lightness and grace of the movements, the martial art is cunningly disguised as dance.’
    • ‘While it is true that some of us are with blessed with natural grace of movement, this doesn't necessarily translate to dance movement.’
    • ‘The rhythm of his run, the accuracy of the plant and the ease and effortless grace with which he flipped over the cross bar provided a fascinating spectacle.’
    elegance, stylishness, poise, finesse, charm
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  • 2Courteous goodwill.

    ‘at least he has the grace to admit his debt to her’
    • ‘They didn't have to give me their time but they did - and they did it with humour and good grace.’
    • ‘All Americans have come to see this city as place of bravery, of generosity and grace.’
    • ‘And he didn't even have the good grace to admit being caught out.’
    • ‘At least he has the good grace to admit that the professional relationship he has with his deputy is different these days.’
    • ‘They've tolerated our haphazard approach to marriage with grace and humour.’
    • ‘Despite suffering what must have been a hurtful rebuff for a young academic, she spoke of him in very respectful terms, characteristic of her usual grace.’
    • ‘And they are familiar with every principal difference between UK and US culture and deal with them with grace and good humour.’
    • ‘All these visitors to our realm should be greeted with the same grace and courtesy.’
    • ‘She let me off the hook with grace, respect and her trademark southern charm.’
    • ‘He handles it all with politeness and good grace.’
    • ‘Rather than seeing this as a sign of weakness, I see it as a sign of grace, courtesy, and diplomacy.’
    • ‘Your grace and diplomacy take you to high places and to important people.’
    • ‘‘I don't want to make a big deal out of this,’ she says with a characteristic mixture of grace and frankness.’
    • ‘When he visited us in Delhi, I was immediately charmed by his grace, civility and intellectual sensitivity.’
    • ‘At least he had the good grace to apologize quickly.’
    • ‘She tolerated my eleven year old's questions with grace and kindness.’
    • ‘And to give him his due, Monty had the good grace to admit the article had spurred him on to prove he could still win at the highest level.’
    • ‘They were the picture of decency, commitment, and stability, of grace, strength, and integrity.’
    • ‘All the guests were models of decorum, grace and manners and I didn't know if I would get used to such good behaviour.’
    • ‘Everyone in New York was so proud of the politeness, grace and conduct of their visitors who have made countless friends throughout the US.’
    courtesy, courteousness, politeness, manners, good manners, mannerliness, civility, decorum, decency, propriety, breeding, respect, respectfulness
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    1. 2.1graces An attractively polite manner of behaving.
      ‘she has all the social graces’
      • ‘Campus interviewers often rush through résumés, looking more for future graduates with potential, which may or may not amount to social graces.’
      • ‘Nanotechnology may cure chemically-based paranoia and depression forever, but it will not confer social graces on the awkward - or compassion on the intolerant.’
      • ‘In many tribal cultures, the social graces, being polite, showing respect and personal interactions are more important than being on time.’
      • ‘There is a stereotyped image of the virus writer: male, in his teens or early twenties, technically talented but lacking in all the social graces.’
      • ‘It's not everyday someone just offers you food, so good graces and manners were what he needed at this moment in time.’
      • ‘In Japan, by observing all the social graces, I could often pass for a native.’
      • ‘High-minded citizens petitioned Congress to vote in a new era of enlightened laws to cultivate the social graces.’
      • ‘From an early age, children are trained in etiquette and the social graces.’
      • ‘My tutor hadn't explained the social graces: how, to some extent at least, all players around the table often want the same outcome for the dice and build up some camaraderie.’
      • ‘Perhaps there you can learn some of the basics of the social graces.’
      • ‘It's just that I don't have the personality to sit still and make sure to keep my laughter at a low tone and pretend I am interested in mundane things for the sake of social graces.’
      • ‘For all her military ambitions, Dana was well trained in the social graces, and could waltz as well as she could fight.’
      • ‘There is no doubt manners and social graces are essential pillars to hold up our society.’
      • ‘He has a marvelous ability to handle women - with all the social graces.’
      • ‘Her family was well connected, and Griffith received an education suitable for a fine lady in polite literature, French, poetry, and the social graces.’
      • ‘And above all, he has replaced his father's courtesy and good graces with an almost proud rudeness and scorn for others.’
  • 3(in Christian belief) the free and unmerited favor of God, as manifested in the salvation of sinners and the bestowal of blessings.

    • ‘In a general sense this miracle speaks to us about the dawn of the gospel of grace through Jesus Christ.’
    • ‘He gave away much that others might enjoy the treasure of God's grace in Jesus Christ.’
    • ‘The chief remedy for sin, poverty and dirt should be the gospel of God's free grace.’
    • ‘He is worthy of worship and calls sinners saved by grace to this great endeavour.’
    • ‘Not only does God give us wisdom and His grace, we are blessed with His qualities, which is to be Christ-like.’
    • ‘We are saved by God's free grace, through faith in Christ's atoning death and resurrection.’
    • ‘The book approached the issue of salvation, God's grace, and human free will from a Calvinist perspective.’
    • ‘We all know that Paul's letters emphasise salvation by grace through faith.’
    • ‘How can people appreciate the wonder of grace, forgiveness and salvation if they have not first learnt about God's holiness and the gravity of sin?’
    • ‘Does it bring glory to the Son of God as the only dispenser of grace to guilty sinners - and the only way to God?’
    • ‘Every true Christian is evidence of that, for every one is a sinner saved by grace.’
    • ‘They have no understanding of the gospel, no knowledge of God's free grace, and no experience of the regenerating power of the Holy Spirit.’
    • ‘The truth was that they were saved by grace and that all spiritual blessings were theirs in Christ.’
    • ‘Even at our best, we are pretty ambiguous characters, and it is only by God's grace in Christ that we have hope of salvation.’
    • ‘Harvey also talked about God's grace in his life though.’
    • ‘Paul's gospel is that salvation comes by grace through faith, to Jew and Gentile alike.’
    • ‘If rejection is our dilemma, grace is our salvation.’
    • ‘They know that they stand accepted by God, forgiven and adopted into God's family, solely on the basis of God's free grace.’
    • ‘It is faith in Jesus Christ, whose righteousness has been imputed to us by the free grace of God.’
    • ‘Our main message is salvation through grace alone, by faith alone, through Christ alone.’
    favour, good will, generosity, kindness, benefaction, beneficence, indulgence
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    1. 3.1 A divinely given talent or blessing.
      ‘the graces of the Holy Spirit’
      • ‘Peace grows when the graces of God and the blessings of Earth are not considered possessions to be protected but divine gifts intended for all.’
      • ‘The theme will be thanksgiving for the many graces and blessings we receive.’
      • ‘A fair number of the devotees we spoke to believed that this is the most auspicious moment of the festival and everyone who is present and sees the flat being hoisted, receives special blessings and graces from the Holy Mother.’
      • ‘By God's great grace, his prayers for my salvation have now been answered.’
      • ‘In our day and age, we have to be thankful for small graces.’
      • ‘That's not only uncharitable, it's an almost guaranteed way to blind oneself to all the graces of the sacrament of Holy Orders.’
      • ‘First they acknowledge publicly their commitment to the Catholic Church and receive the graces of the sacraments but they also enjoy being fussed over, dressing in new clothes and getting lots of money!’
      • ‘He didn't accept that her experiences were divine graces and ordered her to terminate her ecstasies as soon as she felt them beginning.’
      • ‘The seven deadly sins and their antitheses, the four cardinal virtues and three heavenly graces, provide the book's organising principle.’
      • ‘For John, mystical theology is a gift of grace by which a prayerful person stands before and has some kind of experience of the presence of God.’
      • ‘Perseverance is an unmerited gift of grace, just as is also the initial turning of the will to God in faith and penitence.’
    2. 3.2 The condition or fact of being favored by someone.
      ‘he fell from grace because of drug use at the Olympics’
      • ‘It's been an abrupt fall from grace for the author.’
      • ‘In fact, her perfect fall from grace earns nothing but fresh punishment for her lack of attention to detail.’
      • ‘He had two Oscar nominations, before falling from grace and into an ugly drug habit.’
      • ‘They themselves have fallen from grace in recent years, with the exploits of their junior footballers taking most, if not all, of the limelight away from the hurlers.’
      • ‘Burdened by addiction and avarice, Fatty's rise to stardom soon became a fall from grace.’
      • ‘Fella went on to say that after this fall from grace, everybody expressed shock, shock I tell you, that this man was so reckless.’
      • ‘Richardson's sad fall from grace began with his addiction to cocaine.’
      • ‘But it suffered a spectacular fall from grace when about £2bn of its funds ran into severe trouble as equity markets plunged.’
      • ‘I will put aside my own feelings in order to examine the facts of his fall from grace.’
      • ‘Stevens isn't referring to conflict of interests here, but his words are the best assessment of the Supreme Court's fall from grace.’
      • ‘Chris, then, has fallen from grace and is living in a kind of purgatory, respected but terribly alone, knowing he can never be forgiven because the person he wronged is dead.’
      • ‘Spending his final years a man in exile, Ray lived a life where drugs and alcohol caused his fall from grace.’
      • ‘We always knew that their descent into the heinous crimes that they once covered with alleged-virtue would make for a magnificent fall from grace.’
      • ‘The genre's current fall from grace stems from the fact that it is dominated by the same DJs now as it was in 1988.’
      • ‘A fall from grace does not take much: a drunken tumble, a night out with the wrong man, an inadvertent outburst, a struggle with dependency.’
      • ‘In its infancy, the process fell from grace because of production problems.’
      • ‘Just when Bangalore's lakes are heading towards a fall from grace, lake wardens are all set to rejuvenate them.’
      • ‘Suffice to say, Harry's homecoming does not see him greeted with open arms, and the majority of the story is concerned with Harry's attempts to regain Hannah's good graces.’
      favour, approval, approbation, acceptance, commendation, esteem, regard, respect, preferment, liking, support, goodwill
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  • 4A period officially allowed for payment of a sum due or for compliance with a law or condition, especially an extended period granted as a special favor.

    ‘another three days' grace’
    • ‘The company has a 30-day grace period to decide whether to make the payments.’
    • ‘In February, the plaintiff again sought and was granted a further grace period to March 31, 1995.’
    • ‘The offer of a period of grace is a critical factor in the underwriting of this form of business.’
    • ‘He says that the Mars mission could take place as early as 2009, but the two years' grace period allows the agency to spread the cost around that much more.’
    • ‘Late fees now average $29, and most cards have reduced the late payment grace period from 14 days to zero days.’
    • ‘Just before you know you may miss a payment, ask for a cure, which is a 30-day grace from your mortgage payment.’
    • ‘The loans were provided at favourable terms, and a period of grace for their repayment was sometimes granted, with significantly low interest rates.’
    • ‘However, to avoid a potentially chaotic situation, a 6-month grace period is provided before any regulations may be made invalid.’
    • ‘Legislation regarding the taxing of bookmakers was going to be amended and they would be given six months' grace under the old payment system.’
    • ‘Effectively, the family can be given a year's grace before the court grants possession.’
    • ‘Its purpose was to give borrowers a period of grace before repayments of principal become due.’
    • ‘The loan should be repaid within 10 years and has a 5-year grace period and preferential interest.’
    • ‘The loans are extended for up to 12 years with three-year grace period and are available for almost all sectors of the economy.’
    • ‘If they are initially below 30 per cent, but then rise to above 35 per cent, the period of grace shall be limited to one year.’
    • ‘Subjects were allowed a period of grace, 20% of the period covered by the previous prescription, to obtain another prescription of the drug.’
    • ‘Of course, it is upon this 12-month grace period that Oakley wish to rely.’
    • ‘If the patient cannot pay immediately, a period of grace is allowed, but he maintained that this is not the norm.’
    • ‘However the local policy of 3 months grace is not a rule of law, and the overall conduct needs to be looked at.’
    • ‘Quick work was necessary to allow adequate time for the implementation of the legislation within the year's grace allowed by the court, he said.’
    • ‘The pilot scheme involves cars which are not insured being removed from the road while the drivers are given a period of grace usually seven days in which to organise insurance and recover their vehicles.’
    deferment, deferral, postponement, suspension, putting back, putting off, adjournment, delay, shelving, rescheduling, interruption, arrest, pause
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  • 5A short prayer of thanks said before or after a meal.

    ‘before dinner the Reverend Newman said grace’
    • ‘In many graces, we ask God's blessing for good food and good company.’
    • ‘They don't leave their rooms until everything is tidy and say grace before every meal.’
    • ‘Rev Armstrong said the grace before meal and Fr Maginn said the thanksgiving afterwards.’
    • ‘Say a simple little grace before meals, even on the odd day’
    • ‘Finally cubes of sweet juicy mango and fragrant curry leaves were added and we sat down to enjoy a meal with all the family after saying grace in Malayalam.’
    • ‘You two don't say grace at meals, or kiss each other good morning, good night or good-bye.’
    • ‘I am grateful to my parents in a way as I have never been forced to go to church or to say grace before meals (except at junior school).’
    • ‘Every time you eat (whether it's a snack or a seven-course meal), say grace.’
    • ‘She ensured that they said their nightly prayers and grace before meals.’
    • ‘Twain joined Livy at prayers and grace before meals.’
    • ‘The boys eat dinner together with each set of grandparents, say grace before meals, and read or share stories at night.’
    • ‘Neither of my parents had been overly religious although Da had insisted on saying grace before meals and he refused to do any work on a Sunday.’
    • ‘Daddy wasn't religious - none of us were - but he had always said grace before meals, ever since I could remember.’
    prayer of thanks, thanksgiving, blessing, benediction
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  • 6His", "Her", or "Your""GraceUsed as forms of description or address for a duke, duchess, or archbishop.

    ‘His Grace, the Duke of Atholl’
    • ‘Father replied that he had once made the acquaintance of the Duke of Covington and he would write to His Grace and see if he could help me secure a good position.’
    • ‘This is a state-of-the-art vessel, Your Grace.’
    • ‘Last week, His Grace, Archbishop Clifford has given his blessing to the plans and sent his adviser on church buildings, to inspect our parish properties.’
    • ‘Back on the waterfront, the most senior man among Reservists, Major General His Grace the Duke of Westminster, paid a visit to the Royal Naval and Royal Marines Reservists at the Royal Naval HQ Merseyside in Liverpool.’
    • ‘The Archbishop of York, His Grace Dr David Hope, enthusiastically gave the idea his support and preparations began.’
    • ‘She will be unveiling a recently sculpted bronze head of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, which has been presented to Sandown Park by His Grace the Duke of Devonshire.’
    • ‘You aren't just trying to protect me are you, Your Grace?’
    • ‘Again, thank you, Your Grace, for rescuing me from that vile man.’
    • ‘The awards will be presented by His Grace, the Duke of Gloucester, in the Royal Pavilion on Tuesday, July 1.’
    • ‘My father is William Seymour, brother to His Grace the Duke of Somerset.’
    • ‘Interestingly, the Archbishop of Canterbury has so far declined to comment but spokesmen say, somewhat unenthusiastically, that His Grace could ‘see the value’ in inviting them.’
    • ‘I am sorry, Your Grace, but I could never trust myself with that responsibility.’
    • ‘Before she could change her mind, he said quickly to the Cardinal, ‘Thank you for the lesson, Your Grace,’ and turned and ran from the courtyard.’
    • ‘I am sorry, Your Grace, but perhaps I am misunderstanding something.’
    • ‘Will His Grace, the Duke of Westchester, be attending the ball, Miss Maria?’
    • ‘‘It is a pleasure, Your Grace,’ she said, and bowed with a certain level of strength and humility, which overshadowed Elizabeth's own nature.’
    • ‘He was plotting to overthrow the counsel, and even yourself, Your Grace.’
    • ‘Finally, I must acknowledge the kindness of His Grace The Duke of Norfolk in allowing access to his archives at Arundel Castle.’
    • ‘Nathaniel is a Duke and can either be called Your Grace or the Duke or the Duke of Hartford.’

verb

  • 1with object and adverbial Do honor or credit to (someone or something) by one's presence.

    ‘she bowed out from the sport she has graced for two decades’
    • ‘John Taylor is acknowledged as one of the greatest hurlers ever to play for Laois and indeed one of the finest exponents ever to grace the ancient game.’
    • ‘She was fiddling with the oven when she noticed I had graced her with my presence.’
    • ‘Tonight is also boring, because Sky has not graced us with her presence.’
    • ‘Botham, 48, is widely considered to be one of the greatest all-rounders ever to grace the game.’
    • ‘Greaves, a goal-scorer of legendary prowess, is one of the greatest footballers ever to grace the English game.’
    • ‘A Tour of pure nostalgia with some of the greatest artists ever to grace the concert stage in Ireland will be coming to the north west next month.’
    • ‘And how does he intend to unseat one of the greatest champions that has ever graced these parts?’
    • ‘They are without doubt one of the most entertaining live rock shows to ever grace the stage.’
    • ‘Mr Palmer said: " Manchester has delivered a magnificent stadium that will grace the city and will be a worthy legacy for Manchester and British sport.’
    • ‘It was great because we got to stay next door to my in-laws, and my mom, probably one of the best cooks ever to grace this planet, lived around the corner.’
    • ‘For those of you who have never heard of the man, he was one of the wittiest, cleverest and funniest comedians that ever graced this earth.’
    • ‘He was selected on the team of Centenary announced five years ago and is regarded as one of the finest footballers ever to grace the Gaelic fields.’
    • ‘Sampras refused to be drawn on the question of whether he was the greatest player ever to grace the game.’
    • ‘While in Boston he teamed up with Johnny Sain, another pitcher, and the two became one of the greatest duos ever to grace a baseball diamond.’
    • ‘She turned full time professional in 1979 and came to the attention of the great Mark Murphy, one of the most accomplished and respected jazz vocalists ever to grace a stage.’
    • ‘It is fitting that the second half of the top ten best performances of 2003 should include one of the finest Sligo bands ever to grace a stage.’
    • ‘Flex congratulates Don, one of the nicest guys to ever grace the sport, on his successful surgery.’
    • ‘He is perhaps one of the most honest and caring people to ever grace our screens.’
    • ‘However, I'm pretty sure that his biggest claim to fame is that of being one of the best live performers ever to grace a concert hall or stadium.’
    • ‘If you have followed my guidelines, you will have undoubtedly created the most perfect email to ever grace the Internet!’
    dignify, distinguish, add distinction to, add dignity to, honour, bestow honour on, favour, enhance, add lustre to, magnify, ennoble, glorify, elevate, make lofty, aggrandize, upgrade
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    1. 1.1 (of a person or thing) be an attractive presence in or on; adorn.
      ‘Ms. Pasco has graced the front pages of magazines like Elle and Vogue’
      • ‘Her eyes lit up with a star-struck grin gracing her pale, freckled face.’
      • ‘Some of his mural paintings grace the Synod Palace in Sofia and Varna Cathedral.’
      • ‘The boy nodded, a crooked grin gracing his high, rosy cheekbones.’
      • ‘What a contrast that would be from the spoiled, overpaid and selfish athletes who normally grace the covers of sports magazines.’
      • ‘He is the most gorgeous man to ever grace the planet, plain and simple.’
      • ‘His woodcarvings still grace the Hotel Marauw and Biak's House of Arts.’
      • ‘Before Hamm in January 1997, no woman had ever graced our cover.’
      • ‘Neither one moved or spoke, but a soft smile graced both of their mouths as they held each other.’
      • ‘And he did so in some of the most powerful images ever to grace a billboard.’
      • ‘Huge oaks, cedars and wisteria grace the 1,300 acre stretch of rambling greens known as Deer Park.’
      • ‘A special table will grace the Great Chamber of a historic house in York in memory of one of its volunteers.’
      • ‘Jason's sister pulled him into a tight hug, that radiant smile still gracing her lips.’
      • ‘Her images grace everything from linens and bedding to stationery products and floor coverings.’
      • ‘The work will also grace the cover of the 45,000 programs distributed all across the state.’
      • ‘One of his prints also graces the entire back cover of the current issue of ‘Harvest’ - the Diocesan quarterly magazine.’
      • ‘It was April 10, 1912, and in less than an hour the most majestic ship to ever grace the seas would begin her historical maiden voyage.’
      • ‘With small blond curls gracing his head and bright blue eyes, Jake was the object of Nell's affections.’
      • ‘I am delighted to learn an image of the sculpture will grace the new twenty-dollar bill.’
      • ‘They would grace our otherwise cluttered shelves.’
      • ‘Huge wooden beams in the bedroom and drawing room once graced an Aberdeen wool mill.’
      adorn, embellish, decorate, furnish, ornament, add ornament to, enhance
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Phrases

  • be in someone's good (or bad) graces

    • Be regarded by someone with favor (or disfavor)

      • ‘Do you honestly think that after pleasing forty clients this week alone that I'd need to be in your good graces to survive the month?’
      • ‘In this multicultural world, people from those other cultures demand that they be treated as equal, command the same respect and be in our good graces.’
      • ‘Though the people that hung out with him really didn't like him, they preferred to be in his good graces than otherwise.’
      • ‘The Lady Morrigan herself has commended you on your fine performances, and suggests that if you keep this up, you will be in her good graces.’
      • ‘I knew that the second my Dad tasted it Steve would forever be in his good graces, due to the fact that my Dad is a slave to his taste buds.’
      • ‘It's been a long struggle since then, but I think I'm back in their good graces now.’
      • ‘Rule #21 talks about how to get back into the good graces of the group.’
      • ‘Right now, Christians only need obey seven basic rules of morality to be in God's good graces.’
      • ‘She guessed that it probably belonged to one of the slaves that were in the queen 's good graces.’
      • ‘We introduced ourselves and he promised coffee around the halfway point of our night, and by then he was in my good graces.’
  • there but for the grace of God (go I)

    • Used to acknowledge one's good fortune in avoiding another's mistake or misfortune.

      • ‘When I see it from a professional point of view I think there but for the grace of God go I, but it hits you very differently when you are a parent - it was my Nicola, not just anyone.’
      • ‘You know there but for the grace of God… I was just lucky that after my mother died my Aunty Linda was around to take Father and I under her wing otherwise heaven knows where we would have ended up what with his drinking so bad and all.’
      • ‘It's the subject matter, in effect you're saying there but for the grace of God - I wouldn't have wanted to have made any of those moral decisions.’
      • ‘My attitude is, there but for the grace of God…’ ‘When I hear people moaning, I think they should come and sit in here for a week and see what goes on and the heartbreak.’’
      • ‘And we know at one level that there but for the grace of God, or fate, or elementary physics, we could all have been victims.’
      • ‘Proprietors themselves, perhaps feeling that there but for the grace of God go they, discourage serious criticism of their rivals.’
  • with good (or bad) grace

    • In a willing and happy (or reluctant and resentful) manner.

      • ‘He would, by his own admission, prefer not to have to address large groups, though he approaches this part of his job with good grace.’
      • ‘By accepting the residents' concerns and the council's decision with good grace, they would have emerged with a few more friends.’
      • ‘There was no train anywhere near - nothing even shown on the indicator boards - and yet everyone took it with good grace, and sat patiently, quietly, reading or just looking around.’
      • ‘You take your tumbles with good grace and always come up smiling.’
      • ‘Certain things I can forgive; occasionally I have forgotten how to spell my own name so I smile with good grace upon atrocious spellers and look with kindly benevolence upon the overuse of commas.’
      • ‘They seem to be very against any form of control for what they do, and I have never in my life met anyone who was willing to stop smoking with good grace when asked.’
      • ‘It was very hard fought, but always with good grace.’
      • ‘He accepted his failure with good grace and went back to the Senate.’
      • ‘If one has apologised, one should accept it with good grace.’
      • ‘And residents and community leaders are now calling for developers to accept the decision with good grace and abandon the entire scheme.’
      willingly, without hesitation, unhesitatingly, gladly, happily, cheerfully, with pleasure, without reluctance, ungrudgingly, voluntarily
      View synonyms
  • the (Three) Graces

    • Three beautiful goddesses (Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne), daughters of Zeus. They were believed to personify and bestow charm, grace, and beauty.

      • ‘The group's preoccupations - love, beauty, poetry - are indicated by the divinities most often invoked in Sappho: Aphrodite, the Graces, and the Muses.’
      • ‘The figure of Hope, turned away from the viewer, is particularly reminiscent of antique and contemporary depictions of the Graces, which often have one figure facing the other two.’
      • ‘Mighty Zeus, the King, commanded the Graces, ‘Go to the goddess of the Earth to appease.’’
      • ‘King Citheron and the Graces wear Roman togas.’
      • ‘A portion of my research has been concerned with oblivion: the figure of Lethe, mother of the Graces.’
      • ‘David re-created this arrangement (but the author does not think it useful to mention it) when he showed Lesacre in 1807-8 and his last large painting, Mars Disarmed by Venus and the Graces, in 1824.’
      • ‘From two superb Bouchers and a Ricci which was once with the Graces in the collection of Woburn Abbey, we move among portraits of the great Scottish patrons of the era.’
      • ‘Taking up his brush at the age of 38 to paint Nature Adorned by the Graces, Rubens was out to make an impression, and he knew that he couldn't do it alone.’
      • ‘Wit befriends Venus and the Graces, while Learning allies herself with Minerva and the Virtues.’

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin gratia, from gratus ‘pleasing, thankful’; related to grateful.

Pronunciation

grace

/ɡreɪs//ɡrās/