Main definitions of gore in English

: gore1gore2gore3

gore1

noun

  • Blood that has been shed, especially as a result of violence.

    ‘the film omitted the blood and gore in order to avoid controversy’
    • ‘I was genuinely quite shaken by the film, though - it's all machine guns rattling thunderously in your face and metal clanking noises - but the gore is pretty believable.’
    • ‘But I think in this day and age, unfortunately, films require a little bit of blood and gore.’
    • ‘Blood and gore has lined every street, and in every corner the echoes of a million screams can be distinctly heard.’
    • ‘I was expecting to see blood and gore, but thankfully the slope in that place was not steep and quite grassy.’
    • ‘There is blood and gore, crumpled car wreckage and crushed drivers - real pictures of real accident scenes.’
    • ‘The most convincing serial-killer movies aren't the ones drenched in blood and gore, says Gordon Burn.’
    • ‘Unlike the rest of the world, our news coverage of the war remains sanitised, without a glimpse of the blood and gore inflicted upon our soldiers or the women and children.’
    • ‘The older man lead the younger by the arm back into the room, where the stench of blood and gore seemed to have intensified.’
    • ‘I found myself squinting and tilting my head, trying to pick out what the surgeons are up to amid the blood and gore.’
    • ‘One by one the ghosts are released, all thirsting for some blood and gore.’
    • ‘This film doesn't have to show its claws with blood and gore because the psychological torment is enthralling enough.’
    • ‘The more modern theatre revelled in violence, in sharing traumatic indignities and violations, rivalling the slaughter on the streets, spilling blood and gore on the stage.’
    • ‘I can see that reasoning - the gore in modern horror films is generally excised as much as possible, but this is generally in the interest of broadening the audience in the theater.’
    • ‘Titles in this category may contain intense violence, blood and gore, sexual content, and/or strong language.’
    • ‘Press scrutiny is very limited and declining, as monopolist local papers cut back; and TV news, the dominant source of local information, is far more interested in blood and gore.’
    • ‘Instead of focusing on blood and gore, she focuses on manuscripts, maps, letters and the places that house them: libraries, archives, and monasteries.’
    • ‘The blood and gore can cause revulsion even in the most hardy.’
    • ‘I cannot just brush off scenes of violence, blood and gore, not to mention senseless killing.’
    • ‘These images unflinchingly confronted the gore, the naked terror, the arrogant incompetence, the pointless cruelty, the insane devastation of the military nightmare.’
    • ‘The fight scenes are superbly choreographed and the gore is kept to a minimum (although there's one spectacular beheading).’
    blood, bloodiness
    bloodshed, slaughter, carnage, butchery
    cruor, grume
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English gor dung, dirt of Germanic origin; related to Dutch goor, Swedish gorr muck, filth The current sense dates from the mid 16th century.

Pronunciation:

gore

/ɡôr/

Main definitions of gore in English

: gore1gore2gore3

gore2

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • (of an animal such as a bull) pierce or stab with a horn or tusk.

    • ‘Mount Gambier's Luke Versace, who was gored by a bull in Pamplona two years ago and has inexplicably been a local hero ever since, ran in the Stawell Gift yesterday.’
    • ‘Leafing through the Kingdom's local paper, your diarist was caught by the horrific story of how a man was savagely gored by a circus elephant in Tramore, Co Waterford.’
    • ‘Although he remained still, the bull gored him in the abdomen, injuring his colon and bladder.’
    • ‘But I can tell you what it feels like to be attacked by a grizzly bear, gored by a bull, bitten by a venomous snake or attacked by African killer bees.’
    • ‘A few moments ago a Czech cowboy slipped in the muck and was gored by a bull.’
    • ‘Sound effects - grunts of pain, for example, when Portuguese men are gored by a bull - were added, not to mention an incongruous orchestral soundtrack.’
    • ‘I bet they had access to people being gored by bulls at the running of the bulls?’
    • ‘If you look at it closely there are blood stains on the embroidered jacket and this is the costume that a matador was wearing in a 1922 bull fight in which he was gored to death.’
    • ‘Four people were gored and several others sustained scrapes and cuts yesterday as large crowds of enthusiasts in the Spanish city of Pamplona ran alongside six fighting bulls in the third bull run of the annual San Fermin festival.’
    • ‘Four runners, including two Americans, were gored by the bulls and admitted to the hospital.’
    • ‘In 1995, a bull from the same ranch as those running yesterday gored a young American to death in the early morning run.’
    • ‘A farmworker suffered serious injuries when he was gored by a bull on his father's Huddersfield farm.’
    • ‘He then saw a stampede of wild cattle, set loose from the docks in the pandemonium, and began shooting at them - but was unable to kill them all before a man was gored to death.’
    • ‘In addition to the aforementioned bone splinters of the skilled Japanese swordsman, Muldrow uses the skins of the goats that gore him with their horns.’
    • ‘In East Timor he has had to help treat a range of injuries including vehicle accident victims, sufferers of cerebral malaria and even a local gored by a bull.’
    • ‘I've been injured by a bull in Mexico and in 1967 I was gored by a bull in France.’
    • ‘Soon after Marco and Lydia fall in love she is gored by a bull and rendered comatose.’
    • ‘Six people were gored during Saturday's ‘encierro’, or bull running, when hundreds of runners sprint alongside or ahead of six prime fighting bulls.’
    • ‘A British wildlife artist who made a career of depicting Africa's fauna was gored to death by a buffalo, police said yesterday.’
    • ‘When she is gored by a bull, she winds up in the same hospital as Alicia, in the same vegetative state.’
    pierce, stab, stick, impale, puncture, penetrate, spear, spit, horn
    View synonyms

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense stab, pierce): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

gore

/ɡôr/

Main definitions of gore in English

: gore1gore2gore3

gore3

noun

  • A triangular or tapering piece of material used in making a garment, sail, or umbrella.

    • ‘This is now wrong because parachutes of different design could have gores from 60 to 180 cm wide, which will make quite a difference in parachute sizes, still having the same number of gores!’
    • ‘I have made two so far, view B six gores in a soft synthetic suede, and view A four panels with a centre front and centre back inset godet in a heavy wool crepe.’
    • ‘And they introduced decorative gores using extra scraps of unused leather of other material.’
    • ‘Or perhaps it was to do with the shape of the biscuits: the wedges identical in shape to the individual gores of the full, bell-hooped petticoats worn by ladies at Court in the 16th century.’
    • ‘Generally, as a woman's bust size goes up, so should the gore.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • Make with a gore-shaped piece of material.

    ‘a gored skirt’
    • ‘With more attention focused on legs, hemlines rise and are angled, gored, tiered or flippy.’
    • ‘Rather than pencil-straight skirts, steer toward gored and A-line styles with a little more fullness for easier fitting and camouflage.’
    • ‘Fashions for women's dresses featured skirts just below the knee, usually with three gored pieces front and back, and used as little fabric as possible.’
    • ‘Our popular flared gored skirt is now available in a light weight denim.’

Origin

Old English gāra triangular piece of land of Germanic origin; related to Dutch geer and German Gehre, also probably to Old English gār spear (a spearhead being triangular).

Pronunciation:

gore

/ɡôr/