Definition of go to law in US English:

go to law

phrase

British
  • Resort to legal action in order to settle a matter.

    • ‘But however serious those four examples are, it is better impossible to resolve it than to go to law; you would agree?’
    • ‘I asked the insurance company not to pay it, but they did because it was cheaper to settle it that way rather than going to law.’
    • ‘Neighbours go to law, and even shoot each other, over the most trivial boundary disputes.’
    • ‘And if you feel you've been denied that quality of life by reason of the state's shortcomings, you go to law.’
    • ‘It is clear pitches are being badly prepared, but the authorities are afraid to impose the swingeing penalty of a 25-point ban since they know the penalised county would go to law.’
    • ‘He went to law whenever he believed he was being cheated.’
    • ‘And it is even more disconcerting if two officers of the council, having gone to law and losing, now pass on the bill for this affair to the rate-payers.’
    • ‘If there is a dispute when a cohabitation contract is terminated then both parties have to go to law - just as when a married couple are divorced.’
    • ‘Scrapping no-win no-fee deals where solicitors take up cases which previously would have been settled without going to law.’
    • ‘Her decision not to go to law at the time is understandable, given how rape trials can be for the victim a prolonged continuation of the original trauma.’