Definition of go to (or through) hell and back in US English:

go to (or through) hell and back

phrase

  • Endure an extremely unpleasant or difficult experience.

    • ‘He would go to hell and back for her.’
    • ‘‘I need to talk to you, Angel,’ he stated like a man who seemed to have gone to hell and back.’
    • ‘‘I know, darling, I know,’ she said, ‘But your sister has gone to hell and back with this whole thing since then!’’
    • ‘Lance you have to clean your room, or at least help us, it looks like it went through hell and back, more then once.’
    • ‘She has gone to hell and back but mum has always been there for us.’
    • ‘I went to hell and back, but I wouldn't have it any other way.’
    • ‘‘Every mother is prepared to go to hell and back for their children,’ says Carol.’
    • ‘He heard someone walking towards him, some boy who looked like he had just gone through hell and back.’
    • ‘You went to hell and back out there… I have no idea what your strategy was.’
    • ‘He had gone through hell and back to save her after trying so hard to conceal the truth.’
    • ‘Hey, you look like you've gone to hell and back.’
    • ‘Well if he cared for me, he would have told them to go to hell and back again.’
    • ‘We went through hell and back during our training days.’
    • ‘‘I went through hell and back and then back again,’ says the 31-year-old San Diego human resources executive.’
    • ‘He was soaked with sweat and blood - although most of it wasn't his - and looked like he had gone through hell and back.’
    • ‘‘I was so young, and I felt like I'd just gone to hell and back,’ he said.’
    • ‘You'd think the fact that they have gone to hell and back might be a helpful foundation.’
    • ‘He'd gone through hell and back, and almost died.’
    • ‘I always think of that last scene where he's gone through hell and back, then he looks deep in the mirror and sees himself from a new perspective.’
    • ‘He would go to hell and back, and that is what he does.’