Definition of glottal stop in US English:

glottal stop

noun

  • A consonant formed by the audible release of the airstream after complete closure of the glottis. It is widespread in some nonstandard English accents and in some other languages, such as Arabic, it is a standard consonant.

    • ‘No previous knowledge is required, although familiarity with the glottal stop and tolerance of torrential profanity is a necessity.’
    • ‘Most English speakers find it difficult to articulate a vowel without the support of an initial consonant, the default being the glottal stop.’
    • ‘She talks in an aggressive estuary accent, liberally dotted with glottal stops.’
    • ‘It's a very short syllable, almost a grunt, and the final /t/ tends to vanish into a glottal stop.’
    • ‘In English, words that would otherwise begin with a vowel have a glottal stop inserted.’
    • ‘Unlike the other Scandinavian languages, Danish makes use of the guttural ‘r’ and the glottal stop.’
    • ‘In many urban dialects of British English, however, glottal stops are more widely used, particularly by younger working-class speakers in London, Glasgow, etc.’
    • ‘Phoneticians disagree as to whether the glottal stop precedes or follows the consonant.’
    • ‘The true meaning of the glottal stop could be found on Upper Street with a quarter of a million people singing: ‘We are unbea-able!’’
    • ‘An apostrophe called a glottal stop (’) represents a space and a slight pause.’
    • ‘The most common ‘offences’ are the glottal stop, where the t's and d's are dropped from the end of words, and the distortion of vowel sounds.’
    • ‘In English, lots of people would pronounce witness with a glottal stop right before the [n].’
    • ‘He is Scottish at a time when it is no longer a disadvantage to have a glottal stop and a colourful vocabulary.’
    • ‘Let's imagine a language that adds glottal stops to beginnings of words if they start with vowels, and deletes final vowels.’
    • ‘Not only is the glottal stop in the ascendancy in its former stamping-ground, but it is spreading eastwards to assault the tender eardrums of well-heeled Edinburghers.’
    • ‘This brief disruption of the pitch is a sign of some kind of glottal stricture, short of a full glottal stop.’
    • ‘The glottal stop earns its own chapter, being such a dialectic phenomenon.’

Pronunciation

glottal stop

/ˈɡlädl ˌstäp//ˈɡlɑdl ˌstɑp/