Main definitions of gloss in US English:

: gloss1gloss2

gloss1

noun

  • 1Shine or luster on a smooth surface.

    ‘hair with a healthy gloss’
    • ‘I hope it's better than the copywriter who worked on the label, which says ‘has your hair lost it's gloss?’’
    • ‘These natural phenomena lend some sheen and gloss to the lake, which otherwise looks sick and forlorn now.’
    • ‘Translucency, fluorescence, gloss and/or surface texture data also may be obtained.’
    • ‘The entire process takes about a week and is completed by giving the candied chestnuts a final coating of sugar syrup which dries to a smooth clear gloss.’
    • ‘The gorgeous updated style has added volume and lift around the crown while utilizing high gloss shine products for a rocker chic glow.’
    • ‘Just for something to do, she had volunteered to help with the job of adding a touch of colour to drab shells and a coat of clear varnish to add a gloss to porous surfaces, and the packing.’
    • ‘Alma, which can darken hair, can be used for gloss and colour, it says.’
    • ‘She was sure it was real from the incredible sparkle and gloss of the gem.’
    • ‘The eel skins were used locally to ease stiffness in wrists and limbs and eel oil was used to make horse tackle supple and to impart a brilliant and unmistakable gloss to shoes!’
    • ‘It is in the scalp that natural oils are manufactured and distributed throughout your hair to give it shine and gloss.’
    • ‘They were expecting the floor to have a smooth, grey finish, but it was high gloss, like a mirror.’
    • ‘In order to produce a higher sheen or gloss, we need to use a finer abrasive.’
    • ‘You look outside and see it - that shining, shimmering gloss of frost on the ground, on the car, and in the trees.’
    • ‘It was solid oak, hard and formidable, shining gloss in the dimly lit kitchen.’
    shine, sheen, lustre, gleam, patina, shininess, glossiness, brightness, brilliance, shimmer, sparkle
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A type of paint that dries to a bright shiny surface.
      • ‘Currently, the most popular options are pale wood, high gloss white paint and steel sink units.’
      • ‘The bright colours were only available in gloss paint and gloss painted brickwork was quite a statement in itself.’
      • ‘When painting using gloss paint, the paint tends to go on your hands and generally all over the place.’
      • ‘Even the grimy black pine has been painted over with white gloss and the walls are covered in teeny Yeats prints.’
      • ‘I decided the top of the table needed to be evened out with a coat or two of gloss paint.’
      • ‘A gloss finish prevents dirt from becoming embedded in paint.’
      • ‘A previous owner had painted the top in gloss paint, which cracked after only a few weeks, and made the roof look like crazy paving.’
      • ‘I do not want to paint it with gloss paint as it took ages to strip in the first place.’
      • ‘To reflect an even greater amount of light into the room, consider painting the inside of the shaft with gloss or semi-gloss white paint.’
      • ‘Although these paints emit fumes of white spirits and are harder to dispose of than paints with a water-base, decorators continue to use them for wood and gloss finishes indoors.’
      • ‘You might even play up the black wall by using super shiny gloss paint.’
      • ‘The finish, whether gloss or satin, is usually a personal preference.’
      • ‘It is finished in an almost mirror like gloss black finish.’
      • ‘I asked for gloss paint, he gave me satin finish.’
      • ‘The product - available in gloss and satin finishes - comes in 1-liter tins and costs $49.95 per liter.’
      • ‘Paint plain wood frames in a color that complements your furniture and accessories, and spray with a clear acrylic gloss for a shiny finish.’
      • ‘The banisters were painted in white gloss and ingrained with dirt.’
      • ‘Both are good choices and are available in matte, satin, semi-gloss and high gloss finishes.’
      • ‘She may like high gloss finishes but I'm doing this one by hand with linseed oil.’
      • ‘Coating with gloss polyurethane produces a nice finish after painting.’
      • ‘When selecting an oil based finish you will need to decide if you want a satin, gloss or semi gloss finish.’
  • 2in singular A superficially attractive appearance or impression.

    ‘beneath the gloss of success was a tragic private life’
    • ‘Beneath the manufactured gloss of the event is a public transport infrastructure bursting at the seams.’
    • ‘In this day of spin and PR consultants, it can be hard to decipher what lies beneath the gloss.’
    • ‘This film at least rips away the superficial gloss, and forces us to confront the utter savagery of the abuse heaped on Christ.’
    • ‘However, the legislation does still retain a superficial gloss to tempt the consumer/voter.’
    • ‘Beneath the gloss however, under the trees leafy boughs lies something darker.’
    facade, veneer, surface, front, show, camouflage, disguise, mask, semblance, smokescreen, outward appearance, false appearance
    View synonyms

verb

[with object]
  • 1Apply a cosmetic gloss to.

    • ‘Her lip glossed lips were set to a nasty frown and her eyes were screaming murder.’
    • ‘Claire pursed her perfectly glossed lips and considered me a moment.’
    • ‘Couples were marked with dots of gloss enamel paint with the same color combination for each member of a pair, so we could tell if changes had occurred.’
    • ‘He looked at the sleek Chopper, its chrome forks gleamed in the sun, the engine was immaculate, the paint work a deep maroon, glossed with layers of lacquer and hours of polishing.’
    • ‘I use it on my lips, gloss it on my eyebrows, rub it into dry skin, use as hand and foot cream and, on long flights, lavish it under my eyes.’
    • ‘She whispered, and leaned forward, planting her heavily glossed lips on his.’
    • ‘The girls exited the building their lips glossed and shining under the lighting of the building.’
    • ‘Finish the look by glossing your lips in sparkly pink.’
    • ‘Her pink glossed lips were slightly parted, and soft curls framed her face.’
    • ‘He grinned properly, and I felt a smile on my own glossed lips.’
    • ‘My hair was down along my back and my lips were glossed.’
    • ‘She looked over at me and a small smile played on her freshly glossed lips.’
    • ‘Not too much makeup, hair down, lips glossed, nails polished, your red dress on.’
    • ‘To all that's glossed or glazed, to any gold-dust miracle.’
    • ‘His nails had been glossed with enamel.’
    • ‘I mean, chapped glossed lips wasn't very attractive.’
    • ‘A little Vaseline would afterward be glossed onto Mum's lips (so as to avoid chapping ‘not for showing off’).’
    • ‘Casey and her cronies all let their perfect lip glossed lips fall.’
    • ‘The girl looked away, her pink glossed lips trembling at my sudden understanding.’
    • ‘Heather was back, her glossed lips shining like 100-watts in the dim light.’
    • ‘Lips, she added, should be glossed or bordered by lip liner that closely matches the chosen lip colour.’
    • ‘She smoked my eyes with black eyeliner and some glittery black eye shadow, highlighted my checks with a soft natural glow, and glossed my lips with chap stick.’
    • ‘Their movements are predictable, their pickup lines, their reactions, the words that spill out of their perfectly glossed lips, all predictable and sad.’
    • ‘I glossed my lips without color, left my hair sleeked in the ponytail, wore a long beige skirt with a matching sweater and finished with flat, unattractive, brown loafers.’
    • ‘She is also wearing black eyeliner and purple eye shadow and purple tinted glossed lips.’
    • ‘She went natural on the makeup, too, applying just a hint of silvery-lilac shadow to her eyes and glossing up her lips with a frosty pink.’
    • ‘She turned back to the front of the class, a small smile at the edges of her smooth, recently glossed lips.’
    • ‘So I sat down as she powdered my face and dusted eyeshadow and blush and glossed my lips and lined my eyes and curled and coated my eyelashes with mascara.’
    • ‘She only glossed her lips - you couldn't overdo it, even if it was stage makeup.’
    • ‘I shoved a comb into my bag and quickly glossed my lips.’
    make glossy, shine, give a shine to
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Apply gloss paint to.
  • 2gloss overTry to conceal or disguise (something embarrassing or unfavorable) by treating it briefly or representing it misleadingly.

    ‘the social costs of this growth are glossed over’
    • ‘The staff spent their time glossing over such problems in paperwork.’
    • ‘They accused the Party of concealing the facts, fabricating evidence and glossing over the matter to evade responsibility.’
    • ‘But though Einhard declared he would record nothing through hearsay, he also glossed over facts unfavourable to his hero.’
    • ‘When speakers weren't busy glossing over his faults they were just misinterpreting history.’
    • ‘I briefly glossed over it in standard grade maths, but only just.’
    • ‘Without glossing over this important section, the production passes through these scenes quickly and finishes in style with the family walking up the steps to freedom beyond the mountains.’
    • ‘All of these fertile sources rear their heads in this film, and all are briefly glossed over or flat out ignored.’
    • ‘And by glossing over this fact the credibility of the survey gets severely dented.’
    • ‘Yet I wonder about the implications of looking away, of glossing over uncomfortable situations.’
    • ‘The only way we can reattain innocence is by glossing over our pasts, forgetting, and we're not always so good at that.’
    • ‘The arrangements of classical pieces (which they did themselves) highlight their brilliant playing and technique, rather than glossing over it.’
    • ‘Supporting this is anecdotal evidence that this is a responsible decision while glossing over the very real possibility of harm and danger to the student.’
    • ‘What critics here and abroad are glossing over, however, is that as a political marketing device, his address was absolutely brilliant.’
    • ‘It's a tactful way of glossing over really important things.’
    • ‘I'm very deliberately glossing over the surface so I can function.’
    • ‘This strikes me as not exactly a cop out, but rather a glossing over what, to me, is so simple.’
    • ‘Should we gloss over them as proof of the power of suggestion to treat psychosomatic illness?’
    • ‘Rather, they were glossed over and covered up, much as one might conceal a defect in the wall with wallpaper.’
    • ‘The expectation is that we ought to praise the university for its successes, while glossing over its failures.’
    • ‘Therefore, it is not surprising that the article misleads, and glosses over some important points about the safety and effectiveness of water fluoridation.’
    conceal, cover up, hide, camouflage, disguise, mask, veil, draw a veil over, whitewash
    View synonyms

Origin

Mid 16th century: of unknown origin.

Pronunciation

Main definitions of gloss in US English:

: gloss1gloss2

gloss2

noun

  • 1A translation or explanation of a word or phrase.

    • ‘These are followed by his gloss, the modern form in phonetics, and in some cases comments.’
    • ‘In addition to annotations already cited, the word ‘caso’ appears in an italic hand as a gloss for the Spanish edition's ‘ceso’ in the right-hand margin.’
    • ‘If you wonder about ‘furphy’, as I did, here's a gloss and explanation.’
    • ‘For the commonest form of ‘hack’, the OED gives the gloss and etymology.’
    • ‘And some of these people write glosses for well-respected dictionaries.’
    • ‘Third, he has taken this revision as an opportunity to provide real definitions, not simply glosses (translational equivalents) for the Greek words.’
    • ‘In Francia legal manuscripts acquired Germanic glosses, but no full-scale translation.’
    • ‘Like the Liber Commonei, this book too contains numerous vernacular glosses (mostly Old Welsh).’
    • ‘He glosses word-bomb, which he admits is a ‘clunky construction’, at arm's length.’
    explanation, interpretation, exegesis, explication, elucidation
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 An explanation, interpretation, or paraphrase.
      ‘the chapter acts as a helpful gloss on Pynchon's general method’
      • ‘Read in the context of Carpaccio's Hunting on the lagoon and the Two Venetian ladies, Parabosco's text seems to provide the perfect gloss to the material and psychological issues the painting presents.’
      • ‘Add to the author's own notes the glosses and historicizing of the book's editor, and you have a book with nearly three times the length of commentary as of text.’
      • ‘Today, programme notes range from brief glosses to detailed analyses of the music and the circumstances surrounding its composition.’
      • ‘Not only are all statements susceptible to interpretation and qualification, but it is scarcely possible to understand any sophisticated statement without interpretation or gloss.’
      • ‘The theological treatises were probably already known at the court of Charlemagne around 800, and a tradition of glosses to the text probably goes back to the later ninth century.’
      • ‘Such commentary and glosses have profound applications for contextualizing the archival documents presented in this series.’
      • ‘And all subordinate authorities, at whatever level, were expressly forbidden to alter, gloss, or interpret the law in any way.’
      explanation, interpretation, exegesis, explication, elucidation
      View synonyms

verb

[with object]usually be glossed
  • 1Provide an explanation, interpretation, or paraphrase for (a text, word, etc.).

    • ‘Take all the Latin words in Shakespeare, for instance - in Victorian times, educated people had studied Latin in school - not so today, so they need to be carefully glossed.’
    • ‘His zeal can be tiresome, but his writing is so good that you never feel like he's glossing the story.’
    • ‘Many of the partnership claims of this and other networks are glossed to satisfy the needs of program bureaucrats.’
    • ‘He glosses the term as ‘being a colloquial word for anger’.’
    • ‘This theme has to be glossed somewhat, because of the platform, but we can make the point that much criticism of our appointees has been misdirected.’
    • ‘And it has always been glossed by pop historians and ‘experts’ as a mere tribituary.’
    • ‘We lost this case before the Court of Appeal because they conflated the two questions and glossed the plaintiff's evidence in an unacceptable way.’
    • ‘He abandons metaphor in order to gloss the Biblical texts that were foundational to Jewish and Christian marital law.’
    • ‘In these word lists, papalagi is glossed as ‘foreign cloth’.’
    • ‘For myself, I think there are dangers in seeking to gloss the words of the Convention itself.’
    • ‘They use expressions which themselves are glossed, like ‘obvious to try’.’
    • ‘The article begins with an artist's rendering of the ‘smoke’ that billowed from the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, with text that glossed the final days of the war.’
    • ‘But why then did he not simply gloss the word ‘necessity’ with ‘chronos’?’
    • ‘Its complex interrelatedness means that each short work helps gloss the others.’
    • ‘But the third argument could be glossed rather differently.’
    • ‘Intriguingly, venustate is later glossed in that text with the same Old English term, ‘faegemesse,’ perhaps suggesting in this instance a collapse of distinction between sorts of beauty.’
    explain, give an explanation of, interpret, explicate, elucidate
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1gloss on/uponarchaic no object Write or make comments, especially unfavorable ones, about (something)
      ‘those laws, which they assumed the liberty of interpreting and glossing upon’
      • ‘In effect, and glossing on Nielsen's analysis, Durkheim could not escape the limitations of the tradition precisely because he remained true to its central questions and its foundational distinctions.’
      • ‘It's a shrewd attempt to further their cause of inciting hatred and horror by glossing on a Western façade of ‘contemporary culture’ - and exporting it abroad, as a filmmaker notes.’

Origin

Mid 16th century: alteration of the noun gloze, from Old French glose (see gloze), suggested by medieval Latin glossa ‘explanation of a difficult word’, from Greek glōssa ‘word needing explanation, language, tongue’.

Pronunciation