Definition of glory days in English:

glory days

plural noun

  • A time in the past regarded as being better than the present.

    ‘his glory days as a high school basketball star’
    ‘the glory days of tourism’
    • ‘They sit in the bleachers and relive the glory days of their time on the field.’
    • ‘He could tell you all about the glory days of League of Ireland football.’
    • ‘He was pretty excited to meet me and hear about the former glory days, and it was nice to get to meet him and the kids on the team.’
    • ‘Even though it's gone very downhill, it's glory days were blinding.’
    • ‘Having lorded in the first division for the past five seasons we all wondered when would the glory days return.’
    • ‘In its glory days of the past, it was a great event and should prove as popular as ever again this year.’
    • ‘And perhaps new recruits should be taught the way it was in the glory days of the 1970s.’
    • ‘Whose generation was it that that made being young the epitome of cool back in the glory days of Woodstock and the Summer of Love?’
    • ‘The glory days have rarely seemed more distant, but for every home game more than 20,000 fans continue to live the dream.’
    • ‘But, alas, it seems the glory days of the heist are well and truly over.’
    • ‘There may be occasional nostalgia for the pseudo-ideology of the old regime and for its glory days.’
    • ‘His daubings are soon the talk of the intellectual crowd and he's toasted as founder of a new school - but his glory days are numbered.’
    • ‘Although let's face it, the early 80s seem like glory days for Leeds fans at present.’
    • ‘You haven't seen such a one-joke family comedy since the glory days of The Munsters.’
    • ‘But the large number of people who are now making their living out of soft drugs clearly have no fear that the glory days are about come to an end.’
    • ‘This is an exciting project which recalls the glory days of Scottish free-market enterprise leading the world.’
    • ‘It will take years off your life; we all miss the glory days of the eighties, and here you can be whisked right back to them.’
    • ‘Never, not even in the glory days of 1990 and Glasgow City of Culture, have I seen Tramway so buzzing with life.’
    • ‘If those comparisons with the glory days of the dotcom boom don't trigger alarm bells, there are plenty of other reasons to be nervous.’
    • ‘In the glory days of oil-boom expansion of the state sector, jobs proliferated for the boys, and the girls.’


glory days

/ˈɡlôrē dāz/