Definition of globe in English:

globe

noun

  • 1The earth.

    ‘collecting goodies from all over the globe’
    • ‘The overwhelming majority of the world's scientists now agree this is gradually warming the globe, and could see temperatures rise by as much as 6 degrees centigrade this century.’
    • ‘You know when the world is small when a kid in the garage can affect computers across the globe within 24 hours.’
    • ‘Conversations with students from all over the globe have made her world grow by leaps and bounds.’
    • ‘These records indicate that the globe has had numerous ice-ages and warm periods in the past.’
    • ‘Jazz musicians across the globe have strutted various worlds of music.’
    • ‘While evidence continues to mount that humans are heating the globe, the world's nations squabble over a complex fix too timid to solve the problem.’
    • ‘Informed consumers and businesses around the globe are adopting this technology at a phenomenal rate.’
    • ‘The company assists businesses and individuals across the globe in realizing their full potential.’
    • ‘Circumnavigation of the globe changed the world from a flat map to a 3D sphere.’
    • ‘His textbook has since been translated into nine different languages and is used by students at universities around the globe.’
    • ‘Millions are used in factories, hospitals, universities around the globe for radiology, calibrating instruments and research.’
    • ‘On the other hand, there is a rich anecdotal history of brands that have come out of nowhere and marched across the globe to world domination.’
    • ‘He believes Britain has some of the best schools and universities in the globe.’
    • ‘With little spare output capacity around the globe, analysts worry that oil producers would have a difficult time making up for shortfalls at a time of robust demand.’
    • ‘In 1999, over 1800 delegates from around the globe attended the UNESCO World Conference on Science.’
    • ‘Not only has the idea of schooling spread across the globe but, argue world culture theorists, schooling all over the world takes the same general form.’
    • ‘Arctic weather patterns have become a closely watched field in recent years because the region's climate is changing at a much faster pace than that of the rest of the globe.’
    • ‘Owing to the advances in the growing field of information technology, colleges and universities around the globe have begun offering Internet-based courses.’
    • ‘‘It is a window to find new places and to tell readers around the globe about the world, its culture, its science and its nature,’ he said at the launch.’
    • ‘I think the European heatwave was rather local, it has affected the whole of Europe but on average there has been no increase in temperature over the whole globe.’
    world, earth, universe, planet
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    1. 1.1A spherical representation of the earth or of the constellations with a map on the surface.
      • ‘The pin, which was small and had no legible writing, most obviously contained a two-dimensionable representation of the globe, with an eagle above it.’
      • ‘Before its acquisition, the library's collection of approximately seventy globes from before 1900 consisted entirely of European and American examples.’
      • ‘The globes, massive representations of the map of the earth and the map of the stars, were offered as gifts to the King of France, Louis XIV.’
      • ‘I rationalized this time span by calculating the surface area of the globe: 21 square feet.’
      • ‘A seven-foot-tall statue at the National Archaeological Museum in Naples, Italy, shows the god Atlas kneeling with a globe weighing on his shoulders.’
      • ‘On the parliament building, a giant globe looked like another planet, half dark, half lit.’
      • ‘Mapping out a giant globe is not easy, but luckily I am a super whiz at geometry.’
      • ‘The opening scene from Casablanca, featuring a rotating globe and newsreel voiceover, blurs fictional and documentary forms.’
      • ‘Each image above shows the globe of Phoebe, centered at the given longitude.’
      • ‘This was common practice during the Renaissance, when the same craftsmen made both celestial spheres and Earth globes.’
      • ‘The engraved numbers from 1 to 24 on the globe's equator rotate, showing local time.’
      • ‘To capture the effect of the shifting oceans, the globe rotates at one revolution per minute, while 67 internal lights slowly change the crystal oceans from blue to green to white.’
      • ‘People in medieval Europe had chamber pots camouflaged in the shape of a giant leather-bound English classic on a wooden stool, ornate sofa chairs or even giant globes sitting on elaborately carved wooden frames.’
      • ‘Incidentally, globes representing the Earth are often made this way using a regular dodecagon as the equatorial base.’
      • ‘He also fashioned one of the earliest surviving solid wooden globes made in America.’
      • ‘The goal was to see if they could take the globe's touch-sensitive surface and apply it to paper.’
      • ‘Before, a good 70 per cent of people buying a globe or a framed map of the world said, ‘Is it going to match my furniture?’’
  • 2A spherical or rounded object.

    ‘orange trees clipped into giant globes’
    • ‘Translucent yellow globes dangle from long chains over a rectangle of couches and uncomfortable bamboo chairs.’
    • ‘Banks of white arum lilies and the blue globes of agapanthus lined the Levada do Norte, along with oleander bushes in full bloom.’
    • ‘I see oriental paper globes hanging like decomposing cocoons while exotic candles overload the dusty air with their stale perfume’
    • ‘It flexed its toes, opened giant wings, and soared off its globe, out over the rooftops of the great city, down to the small curled body on the pavement.’
    • ‘There's a couple of blue-glazed ceramic globes in the garden, good for an unfocussed gaze.’
    • ‘I asked if the globes looked red or purple and the gentleman said, as they were driving past in the car, that they were not sure whether they were purple or more of a red colour.’
    • ‘The fruit and veg stalls were amazing, piled high with fantastic looking produce, plum tomatoes, giant mangos, mountains of artichoke globes, cauliflowers bigger than footballs.’
    • ‘It's even less traditional up the stairwells where giant alien globes have landed, masquerading as light fittings.’
    • ‘Divert the eye with stylish planting, such as a bed of Iceberg roses underplanted with Pulmonaria ‘Sissinghurst White’, contained by large boxwood globes.’
    • ‘For a moment, the immense globes of her eyes are convex mirrors in which we might, were this not a picture, witness our own gaze.’
    • ‘We are also told to post little globes everywhere.’
    • ‘Others were a little eccentric and gave away yo-yos, 3D paper buses and stress globes.’
    • ‘We call these solids Archimedean globes in honor of Archimedes, who treated the case n = 4.’
    • ‘It resembled a globe on a cylinder, with two nacelles.’
    • ‘The two fish were paired with fresh vegetables and tiny fried potato globes, which were all brought nicely together by a rich cream sauce and punctuated with a brilliant red burst of caviar.’
    • ‘The massive ship's boilers were easily recognised, piercing the gloom like giant globes.’
    • ‘Located in front of the white EPOCS Specter, are two solid black globes moving with precision in the space above the awed technicians.’
    • ‘You will undoubtedly discover that spiky misshapen globes, with occasional squidgy and sticky bits, are not the easiest things to hold for a long time.’
    • ‘The globes sell for about $350, but officials estimated that it could be worth $5,000 or more due to its historical interest.’
    • ‘The radar can spot both horizontal and vertical reflections, which are presented as globes on a grid.’
    sphere, orb, ball, spheroid, round
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    1. 2.1A glass sphere protecting a light.
      • ‘He had a prominent scar across his nose, and he could bend it almost flat to his face - it had been broken from the glass globe on a falling light fixture.’
      • ‘It was a large room lit by a chandelier of gas lamps in pale glass globes; if there were windows they were behind the heavy green drapes opposite.’
      • ‘The tiny globes emitted light 35 times more intensely back toward the laser source than in any other direction.’
      • ‘Just recently, I remembered and I went to renew the light globes.’
      • ‘When a lava lamp is turned on, an ordinary 40-watt bulb illuminates and warms the contents of the glass globe.’
      • ‘Three glass globe lights hang from the ceiling and some original wall-mounted bronze toned light fittings survive.’
      • ‘A few candles were lit, each within a small glass globe.’
      • ‘As built, the steel tubing that upholds the light globes along the bridges was painted gold and copper, as were the metal window frames of the auditorium.’
      • ‘Invert a glass globe that normally goes over an electric ceiling light fixture, tuck a tea light inside, and you've got a holiday lantern.’
      • ‘People left their curtains open and some even found coloured globes to light outside their homes.’
      • ‘Lamps behind globes of milky glass flickered softly, exaggerating the shadows in the carved wall panels, barely lighting the rows of books nestled on their shelves behind latticed glass doors.’
      • ‘Others, such as the fitting of AAA-rated taps and shower roses, or the use of compact fluorescent globes for lighting, can be applied cheaply and easily to all houses.’
      • ‘In the main dining room, clusters of luminous glass globes float over diners; and in private rooms indirect luminance is diffused by suspended plates of translucent glass held in metal frames.’
    2. 2.2A drinking glass shaped approximately like a sphere.
      ‘a brandy globe’
      • ‘Brandy should be sniffed, and the globe of a brandy snifter encourages the aroma to rise before you take a sip.’
    3. 2.3A golden orb as an emblem of sovereignty.
      • ‘Female standing right, presenting wreath to emperor standing left, holding globe and sceptre.’
      • ‘Aeternitas standing to the left, holding globe and sceptre.’
      • ‘A high cap surrounded by three crowns and bearing a globe surmounted by a cross.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]literary
  • Form (something) into a globe.

    • ‘It has become ‘one of those globed compacted things over which thought lingers, and love plays’, its iconic significance guaranteed by Lily's own deep need for harmony and form.’

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense spherical object): from Old French, or from Latin globus.

Pronunciation:

globe

/ɡlōb/