Definition of glee in English:

glee

noun

  • 1Great delight.

    ‘his face lit up with impish glee’
    • ‘Too often their misfortunes are met with glee, a schadenfreude that is quite horrifying.’
    • ‘Some of the world's biggest arms manufacturers are rubbing their hands with glee at the prospect of a war.’
    • ‘With childish glee, I discovered an exercise bike with a television screen attached to the front.’
    • ‘I will admit we took a certain joy or glee in being in on something that others did not seem to know about.’
    • ‘No doubt the ordinary citizens of England and Wales are rubbing their hands with glee at the prospect.’
    • ‘Every hotel in the area is booked for election night as the media anticipate, some with glee, what might be the final act of his downfall.’
    • ‘Between each new variation comes another burst of jubilant glee.’
    • ‘Of course e-cards and virtual flowers are also welcome with great amounts of joy and glee.’
    • ‘He jumps off the table and shouts with glee, thinking about the fortune waiting for him in the bank.’
    • ‘As she neared the end of the piece, a smile of glee and satisfaction began to appear on her face.’
    • ‘A lot of people are relishing this situation with glee and waiting to see what I'll do.’
    • ‘His phrasing is razor-sharp and should be served with relish and glee.’
    • ‘You can feel the enthusiasm as he delightedly chews every line for its last bit of glee and evil intent.’
    • ‘She is full of sudden excited glee; it is like a different person is in her, pushing against her own skin to get out of her.’
    • ‘A true sociopath, he takes great glee in humiliating and injuring the inmates.’
    • ‘His face, through the visor, was contorted in a weird grimace of glee as he brought the club down.’
    • ‘This discovery fills him with such glee that he never tires of proclaiming it.’
    • ‘Of course, I'll be rubbing my hands in glee at the thought of work being closed Monday.’
    • ‘Her eyes went wide with delight as she spun around in glee, holding back a squeal.’
    • ‘Just goes to show how people equate quality with price, he says with glee.’
    delight, pleasure, happiness, joy, joyfulness, gladness, elation, euphoria, exhilaration, cheerfulness, amusement, mirth, mirthfulness, merriment, joviality, jollity, jocularity
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  • 2A song for men's voices in three or more parts, usually unaccompanied, of a type popular especially c.1750–1830.

    • ‘Instrumental tutors were published and glees (simple part-songs for male voices) became popular.’
    • ‘Later, boys were paid to sing treble parts at meetings of glee clubs, and glees for SATB became more common.’
    • ‘Women were still restricted to the parlor, where they played keyboard instruments and the ‘English guitar’ and sang solos and a range of polite glees for upper and mixed voices.’

Origin

Old English glēo ‘entertainment, music, fun’, of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation

glee

/ɡlē//ɡli/