Definition of Glaswegian in English:

Glaswegian

adjective

  • Relating to Glasgow.

    • ‘That, in itself, is a universal story, but here it has a pleasingly Jewish and Glaswegian flavour.’
    • ‘He made his name painting brutal depictions of Glaswegian down-and-outs, hardmen and football thugs.’
    • ‘There will also be plenty of Glaswegian humour, a thimbleful of alcohol or two, and not a Hooray Henry in sight.’
    • ‘His best roles have been studies in the most toxic strains of damaged maleness - serial killers, cannibals, Glaswegian gangsters, underclass Edinburghers, fascist dictators.’
    • ‘This year, following the discovery of St Valentine's relics on Glaswegian soil, the Second City plays host to its very own celebration of all things heart-shaped and passionate.’
    • ‘My experience of the Friday exodus crowds of Geordie brickies, Glaswegian squaddies, screaming babies, laptop luvvies and mobile phonies makes Kings Cross seem like Bombay Central.’
    • ‘More west coast than east, it largely makes up in brooding, Glaswegian menace what it lacks in full-frontal threat.’
    • ‘But Mungo, despite his importance in Glaswegian legend, is not allowed must more than a passing mention, thanks to the scarcity of authentic sources.’
    • ‘The whole Scottish and Glaswegian aspect of his work was important to me as well.’
    • ‘Ironically, he will not be on hand in this country when the announcements are made since he will be in America helping a team of Glaswegian athletes prepare for the New York Marathon.’
    • ‘Uniquely he provides a glossary of Pakistani and Glaswegian words for those who might find navigation difficult.’
    • ‘Barga and Glasgow have a strong connection, since many Glaswegian Italians hail originally from there.’
    • ‘He was a hard-working, fairly hard-drinking, working-class Glaswegian Protestant.’
    • ‘Everything, from the glaikit, Glaswegian characterisations to the physical comedy (more panto than farce), is tailored to the comic actor's public persona.’
    • ‘Amid all this celebration of the wit and wisdom to be found on the streets of Glasgow, Smith also pointed out that the Glaswegian propensity for patter was directly linked to ego size.’
    • ‘Health drinks are for soft southerners who don't understand the bitter evils of driving Glaswegian sleet from October till March.’
    • ‘We love each other, but we can't say that - we're Glaswegian men.’
    • ‘The first genuinely international football competition was the brainchild of Glaswegian businessman Sir Thomas Lipton, who sponsored the Lipton Crown of Italy World Cup in 1909.’
    • ‘They were a cheery lot, especially the roly poly Glaswegian lady who giggled nervously as the ferry humped across the choppy waves.’
    • ‘On a family outing to Kelvingrove Art Gallery, we came across a giant canvas hung (with what I now recognise to have been bristling Glaswegian civic pride) against rich velvet drapes.’

noun

  • 1A native of Glasgow.

    • ‘But there were also scores of Glaswegians in town as well.’
    • ‘The cruise which heralded her return to service was a suitably quirky occasion, as invited guests mingled with ordinary Glaswegians who had snapped up the remaining tickets.’
    • ‘It found that Glaswegians - who are among the unhealthiest people in Europe - are some of the most satisfied with their healthcare.’
    • ‘Edinburgh residents typically countered that Glaswegians were uncouth, and more likely to deliver a Glasgow Kiss as their civic welcome than a European-style peck on the cheek.’
    • ‘Kelvingrove is cherished by generations of Glaswegians.’
    • ‘I believe Glaswegians see themselves as being from Glasgow, not south, east or west.’
    • ‘Apart from football, nothing polarises Glaswegians more than property, and when it comes to the bitter rivalry between the southside and Glasgow's bohemian west end, the barbs are keenly felt.’
    • ‘This was the place for promenade concerts, for art galleries and elegant teas, as well as providing Glaswegians with the best in retail therapy.’
    • ‘It's a history of Glasgow that many Glaswegians are even unaware of.’
    • ‘The fresh Scottish strawberries and raspberries in the shops were once picked by young Glaswegians and Dundonians who wanted some money and fresh air.’
    • ‘Compared with a decade or two ago, Glaswegians are less likely to smoke, more likely to eat healthy foods and are more likely to breast feed their children.’
    • ‘The similarities between Buffalo and Glasgow have meant that she finds Glaswegian humour and Glaswegians themselves not unlike the folks back home.’
    • ‘However, the club could not continue without a feed through to the senior side of native Glaswegians.’
    • ‘There is no doubt that many Glaswegians firmly believe the ruling Scottish establishment looks more favourably upon east than west.’
    • ‘He is keen to encourage lifelong learning for more Glaswegians and cites training as key to solving long-term unemployment problems.’
    • ‘In a week when Scotland emerged as the world leader in asthma, it was sadly inevitable that few eyebrows were raised at the statistic that Glaswegians have the lowest life expectancy in Britain.’
    • ‘Eroded paths will be restored, spectacular viewpoints reinstated and the original design of the ornamental gardens that once charmed Glaswegians brought back to life.’
    • ‘They have the same needs as Glaswegians in terms of health services, social welfare, education and advice.’
    • ‘The decision of stay-at-home tourists to trade up is putting pressure on seaside resorts, not least the burghers of Blackpool, a traditional bolt-hole for thousands of Glaswegians.’
    • ‘I drifted across the United States in my early 20s and like many Glaswegians, have an unrequited love affair with the country.’
    1. 1.1 The dialect or accent of people from Glasgow.
      • ‘He spoke with a west of Scotland accent, possibly Glaswegian.’
      • ‘But whether he'll ever get to grips with Glaswegian is another matter entirely, of course.’
      • ‘We not only speak it but we're quick to imitate their accents - Glaswegian, Mancunian, Yorkshire - and comfort them with all their problems that pour down a telephone line.’
      • ‘The voice is mildly accented but unmistakably Glaswegian, and full of apologies.’
      • ‘I did not endear myself to him - or to my boss, who was nearby - by then repeating his request condescendingly back to him in broad Glaswegian: Oh!’
      • ‘We are divided at times by language, which is a shame because there is nothing so mellifluous as broad Glaswegian with an Asian accent.’
      • ‘‘There you go,’ she says, sarcasm and Glaswegian accent increasing proportionately.’

Origin

From Glasgow, on the pattern of words such as Norwegian.

Pronunciation:

Glaswegian

/ɡlazˈwējən/