Definition of glass eye in US English:

glass eye

noun

  • An artificial eye made from glass.

    • ‘Brown relates the detail, and other indignities and complications he had to put up with, in a manner which would bring a tear to a glass eye.’
    • ‘He'd found a glass eye; an entire nest of them, thirteen to be exact.’
    • ‘He was a shaggy-looking man, who seemed almost as old as seventy, and he was carrying what looked to be a large, round, glass eye.’
    • ‘Following a car accident, it took his children months to notice his glass eye, thanks to his frequent and long absences.’
    • ‘On top of that, he wasn't a very imposing presence and he had a glass eye, the result of an accident that cost him his left eye when he was just 15.’
    • ‘The device itself was just a black sphere made to look like a glass eye.’
    • ‘Surrounded as I was by glass eyes and peg legs, this did not seem strange.’
    • ‘Bill is a man that is feared by all, and with his glass eye (which he likes to tap from time to time with a knife tip) and towering top hat, he is as close as you can come to the devil incarnate.’
    • ‘But, let's face it, you do not lose your loved one for a glass eye.’
    • ‘For a while he affected a black eye patch, but eventually opted for a glass eye after one too many pirate jokes ruffled his infamous ego.’
    • ‘I'm not talking necessarily about the guy with the glass eye.’
    • ‘And I happened to notice that he was wearing glasses and had a glass eye.’
    • ‘These dolls have glass eyes and moulded hair with variety of wigs to choose from.’
    • ‘After all, no other guest is likely suddenly to need a glass eye, and even less likely to need one of this size and color.’
    • ‘I do hope we are not going to need that glass eye I got.’
    • ‘Anna, now with a glass eye, is determined to get on with her life.’
    • ‘In Ireland, glass eye production thrived during our glassmaking heyday.’
    • ‘A chubby boy is fit with a glass eye that inserts with a loud plop.’
    • ‘Incorporated into its elaborate frame are two miniature pairs of binoculars, a pince-nez and a bulbous, Cyclopean glass eye.’
    • ‘Every night in America, prime time coverage has been littered with pen portraits of the US team's finest designed to bring a tear to a glass eye.’

Pronunciation

glass eye

/ˌɡlas ˈī/