Definition of glamour in English:

glamour

(also glamor)

noun

  • 1The attractive or exciting quality that makes certain people or things seem appealing or special.

    ‘the glamour of Monte Carlo’
    as modifier ‘the glamour days of Old Hollywood’
    • ‘The island has long since been a firm favourite of A-list celebrities desperate to escape the glitz and glamour of their showbiz lives.’
    • ‘With the glitz, glamour and sense of history-in-the-making absent, yesterday was simply a rather poor tennis match, which no one much minded who won, least of all the two girls.’
    • ‘It's time again for the glitz and glamour of the Academy Awards.’
    • ‘She was glitz, glamour and pizzazz ripped from the headlines.’
    • ‘The glamour and glitz of the event is keenly awaited - after all it is touted to be the ‘first of its kind,’ in terms of bringing all the stars together on one stage.’
    • ‘However, the show wasn't all glitz and glamour.’
    • ‘It certainly gives me hope that there is a little romance to be found in the world for us normal people, without all the glitz and glamour of a soap opera.’
    • ‘Yes, I know full well that loads of money in no way guarantees you health or happiness, and I would much rather my ordinary lifestyle compared to the glitz and glamour.’
    • ‘ALL too often the glitz and glamour of major building projects overshadow the sweat and toil of the ordinary men and women who worked on them.’
    • ‘This promises to be a night of glamour, glitz and fashion.’
    • ‘The glitz, glamour and sheer size of the big screen took the breath away.’
    • ‘Then after a fabulous night of glitz and glamour, it would be time to ‘turn back into a pumpkin again’.’
    • ‘You know, despite all of modern medicine's glitz and glamour, sometimes the old fashioned remedies work the best.’
    • ‘Our response is automatic because, like the rest of the world's population, we've been conditioned to believe that the television industry is all glitz and glamour.’
    • ‘Middle ways can be reasonable and serious proposals to reform polarized debates, but they also can lack glamour.’
    • ‘There's so much excitement, and glitz, and glamour here.’
    • ‘Popular and not so popular celebrities have been drafted in to add some showbiz glamour.’
    • ‘I am sure the meeting will have all its usual glitz and glamour, as well as plenty of exciting racing, and it could be a big fillip.’
    • ‘Ten years of glitz and glamour, honoring the men and women who serve in what many here call a thankless profession.’
    • ‘There's not a repairman in sight, because plugging all those little money holes brings little glamour to politicians.’
    allure, attraction, attractiveness, fascination, charm, enchantment, captivation, magic, romance, mystique, exoticism, spell
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 Beauty or charm that is sexually attractive.
      ‘George had none of his brother's glamour’
      • ‘Alas, he remained unimpressed by glamour and beauty.’
      • ‘Whereas any black actress who wants to make it in Hollywood has to confront a world where glamour, beauty, sensuality and sexuality, desirability are always encoded as white.’
      • ‘I did not want to be just the glamour quotient in the show.’
      • ‘Her earnestness is seductive, as is her casting of the hero as an empowered young woman, untainted by media-driven ideals of glamour and sexuality.’
      • ‘What happens when a Hollywood sex symbol, a glamour queen or a knockout girl next door gets older.’
      • ‘It's a formula centred around an almost predatory, sexually-confident brand of glamour.’
      • ‘From London to Hollywood, this exhibition explores to just what extent his photographs have influenced our insatiable attitudes towards fashion, beauty and glamour.’
      • ‘Venus in Taurus lends glamour and a fierce ability to enjoy life to the hilt.’
      • ‘Oriental prints were used on dresses reinforcing the Geisha girl theme while lurex and sequin dresses offered glamour for the evening.’
      • ‘You are likely to surprise people with your glamour, beauty and change of image with new styles and wardrobe.’
      • ‘Her glamour and sex appeal come from another era, one when stars like Rita Hayworth danced across the screen.’
      • ‘This fall is all about vintage styles, retro glamour, and sporty chic.’
      • ‘Bette Davis, although possessing moments of glamour and great beauty, played roles that required sensible shoes.’
      • ‘She tries to combat this by living in a world of fantasy, mesmerized by white Hollywood glamour and beauty.’
      • ‘She had beauty, glamour, and a knockout set of legs (or ‘gams,’ in the lingo of that time).’
      • ‘There was so much of glamour, beauty and seduction in that dressing.’
      • ‘The show travels to nearly 200 cities around the world annually with the beauty, elegance, glamour and energy of a Broadway show.’
      • ‘Hurrell helped established the identity of many actresses and actors and created an iconography of steamy sexuality with dreamy glamour.’
      • ‘There is no glamour, no sexuality, on display, only the innocent emotions of a young girl in love.’
      • ‘I think they definitely loved the beauty and the glamour and the clothes and the sets.’
      beauty, allure, attractiveness, elegance, chic, style
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2archaic Enchantment; magic.
      ‘that maiden, made by glamour out of flowers’

Origin

Early 18th century (originally Scots in the sense ‘enchantment, magic’): alteration of grammar. Although grammar itself was not used in this sense, the Latin word grammatica (from which it derives) was often used in the Middle Ages to mean ‘scholarship, learning’, including the occult practices popularly associated with learning.

Pronunciation

glamour

/ˈɡlæmər//ˈɡlamər/