Definition of give someone a break in US English:

give someone a break

phrase

informal
  • 1usually in imperative Stop putting pressure on someone about something.

    • ‘In other words, they're saying: we do enough already - give us a break!’
    • ‘They wish you guys would give them a break and show them some respect.’
    • ‘Though there were actually a couple of slip-ups with the service, we'll give them a break.’
    • ‘Jess, give Amber a break, she's obviously upset.’
    • ‘The politicians need to pay attention to the people that are trying to make it and give them a break once in a while.’
    • ‘‘Please, I've only been a couple of minutes, it's Christmas, give us a break, please’.’
    • ‘It's time to give us a break, because people are fed up with all the inconvenience to pedestrians and drivers.’
    • ‘I have a lot of satisfied customers who have appreciated my efforts enough to use me again and again, so I respectfully suggest you give us a break.’
    • ‘You really mean this, but when you try to tell people, they tell you to give them a break.’
    • ‘So come on ref, give us a break and let us wear our mix-and-match football kit!’
    1. 1.1give me a break Used to express contemptuous disagreement or disbelief about what has been said.
      ‘He's seven times as quick and he's only 20 years old. Give me a break’
      • ‘The French-speaking population has increased over five times in size in the last 150 years. Is that a dying language? Give me a break!’
      • ‘Would anyone genuinely expect serious electoral matters to be raised at a works meeting!? Come on, give me a break.’
      • ‘‘Oh please, give me a break,’ I rolled my eyes jokingly.’