Main definitions of gird in English

: gird1gird2

gird1

verb

[WITH OBJECT]literary
  • 1 Encircle (a person or part of the body) with a belt or band.

    ‘a young man was to be girded with the belt of knighthood’
    • ‘One believer will gird him or herself with a towel, bend a knee, and wash the feet of another in a simple basin, drying the feet with the towel that is wrapped around the waist.’
    • ‘I invest him with your robe, gird him with your sash, entrust him with your authority; and he shall be a father to the inhabitants of Jerusalem and to the House of Judah.’
    • ‘Once elected, the two winners were girt with a sword as Knights of the Shire.’
    • ‘A golden belt girded his waist.’
    • ‘But when the fabric is girding my middle and slung over my shoulder, Brian tells me that I look like an African prince.’
    1. 1.1Secure (a garment or sword) on the body with a belt or band.
      ‘a white robe girded with a magenta sash’
      • ‘They gird their weapons, mount their horses, and form into groups in the guise of a troop of soldiers.’
      • ‘The bushes rustled, and around us three more men, all with swords girt at their sides, stepped out.’
      • ‘Instead, he was dressed in a loose black robe with no sleeves, girt at the waist with a white metal belt.’
      • ‘One was prepared to leave, and had only to gird his sword about his waist, when the other spoke suddenly.’
      • ‘Soon his shoes were being girded with golden spurs.’
    2. 1.2Surround; encircle.
      ‘steel rings that gird the elongated, tubular building’
      • ‘In the eastern section were three broad stone pillars supporting the balcony above, which girded the guest rooms on the second floor.’
      • ‘Well that's interesting, because we sing in our national anthem that ‘Our land is girt by sea’, but we have been slow to recognise its importance in indigenous culture.’
      • ‘I thought of our pilgrimages out of the city, the slow tide of traffic to the shore or family visits, a cincture of security and welcome girding the suburbs and beyond.’

Phrases

  • gird (up) one's loins

    • Prepare and strengthen oneself for what is to come.

      • ‘He calls on ‘progressives’ everywhere to gird their loins for a battle for humanity.’
      • ‘This, then, is the time when we should be taking our last quiet pleasures whilst we gird our loins for the coming assault.’
      • ‘Quite how I am going to gird my loins to restart studying in October, I am not sure.’
      • ‘So after breakfast I brush my teeth, gird my loins and set off into the mythical morning.’
      • ‘But I girded my loins and I gritted my teeth and I did it - with only a slight hint at tears welling up in my eyes.’
      • ‘I think she should have told him and let the family gird their loins against it.’
      • ‘You get more tired and less able to take the stress and to gird your loins and take on another day.’
      • ‘However he never gave up and continually sought to gird his loins with courage.’
      • ‘The ruse of hiding the newspapers no longer works because nowadays when they cannot find them they put two and two together and gird themselves for a funeral.’
      • ‘Meantime, it is essential that we do gird our loins and fight this latest takeover of our right to farm.’
      prepare, get ready, make ready, gear up, nerve, steel, galvanize, brace, strengthen, fortify, bolster, buttress
      View synonyms

Phrasal Verbs

  • gird oneself for

    • Prepare oneself for (dangerous or difficult future actions)

      • ‘The students had girded themselves for the slopes in three distinct modes.’
      • ‘Do we really need them, or would we better off just girding ourselves for a huge fight and getting rid of them?’
      • ‘Both teachers sigh and mentally gird themselves for the next battle.’
      • ‘So, in this alternate history, just as in our real history, America once more girds itself for war.’
      • ‘A local official said the country must gird itself for a ‘disaster scenario.’’
      • ‘He girds himself for an onslaught of late-night callers asking for analysis of the election results.’
      • ‘There's no point in delaying it any longer, and Ian girds himself for her reaction by staring at her with a steel-like gaze.’
      • ‘The news will have surprised the company's lawyers, who only this week were girding themselves for the next round of litigation.’
      • ‘So, in a sense, it is understandable that we gird ourselves for this sober second anniversary with a lingering sense of uncertainty.’
      • ‘With all the players on the political stage girding themselves up for the 2007 presidential elections, the race for the presidency has already begun.’

Origin

Old English gyrdan, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch gorden and German gürten, also to girdle and girth.

Pronunciation:

gird

/ɡərd/

Main definitions of gird in English

: gird1gird2

gird2

verb

[NO OBJECT]Archaic
  • Make cutting or critical remarks.

    ‘they girded at the committee’

noun

Archaic
  • A cutting or critical remark; a taunt.

Origin

Middle English (in the sense strike, stab): of unknown origin.

Pronunciation:

gird

/ɡərd/