Main definitions of gin in English

: gin1gin2

gin1

noun

  • 1A clear alcoholic spirit distilled from grain or malt and flavored with juniper berries.

    • ‘He'd fixed a strong punch in a globe-like crystal bowl, with all kinds of liquors mixed into it - rum, gin, whiskey, vodka, juices and what not.’
    • ‘Favor clear spirits like vodka and gin over darker-colored alcohols like whiskey, brandy or red wine.’
    • ‘These are found in larger amounts in dark liquors, such as brandy, tequila and whiskey, than in clear liquors such as vodka and gin.’
    • ‘At the beginning of the eighteenth century it was universally believed that rum, gin, and brandy were nutritious and healthful.’
    • ‘The more adventurous hobbyist can go beyond beer and wine and turn their hands to liqueurs or to spirits like gin.’
    • ‘I can clearly see the market opening beyond cognac and scotch whisky, possibly to vodka and gin.’
    • ‘Creoles enjoy alcoholic drinks such as beer, gin, and palm wine.’
    • ‘Artisans are also going into vodka, gin and rum, as well as whiskeys.’
    • ‘In those early days cocktails were mainly made with gin, whisky, rum and vodka.’
    • ‘They could choose from vodka, gin, rum, bourbon, scotch or tequila.’
    • ‘Two bars offer brisk service, and the bartenders will occasionally let you order up to four tiny drinks at a time, with rum, gin, vodka and rye on the menu.’
    • ‘Yet this can only have been a very small part of the million of gallons of brandy, gin and rum that were consumed through this period.’
    • ‘A table at the bottom compared the calorie content of 100 ml of beer with the same amount of gin, rum, whisky, cognac and wine.’
    • ‘Use vodka, gin, or any pure alcohol to erase lipstick stains from your collar, or to clean paint or ink stains from your carpet.’
    • ‘France had higher tax rates for spirits which were based on grain, such as whisky, rum, gin, and vodka, than those which were based on wine or fruit, such as cognac, Calvados, and Armagnac.’
    • ‘It is quite easy to make one's own herbal tincture using vodka, gin or some other spirits.’
    • ‘The quantities of the common spirits, such as gin, rum, vodka and whisky are controlled too.’
    • ‘Basic service will include house wines, vodka, whiskey, gin and rum, premium service will offer single-malts, premium wines and brandy.’
    • ‘Staff gave her a choice of gin, vodka or whisky, before she was given two cupfuls to drink immediately.’
    • ‘It helps to have lots of vodka, gin, scotch, brandy, and cognac for all to swill down.’
    strong liquor, liquor, strong drink
    View synonyms
  • 2A two-handed form of the card game rummy in which players are dealt ten cards each and attempt to produce a hand in which the point value of unmatched cards adds up to ten or less.

    • ‘We sat around for a long time playing gin rummy in the hay, when we heard what sounded like a pig's squeal.’
    • ‘As a sideline he was a classical violinist, a master bridge player and a demon at gin rummy, but golf was where he got his kicks.’
    • ‘They all got settled, and first started playing poker, gin, and a few other card games.’
    • ‘After this the men may separate for gin rummy or poker, leaving the women alone to their gossip.’
    • ‘It generates revenues by hosting online backgammon, gin rummy and blackjack, as well as staging golf, darts and pool games.’

Origin

Early 18th century: abbreviation of genever.

Pronunciation:

gin

/jin/

Main definitions of gin in English

: gin1gin2

gin2

noun

  • 1A machine for separating cotton from its seeds.

    • ‘Roller gins vied with saw gins for the fuzzy-seed market into the 1820s and remained the preferred gin for long-staple cotton.’
    • ‘In the future, many gins will have automated moisture-control technology so bales will emerge from the gin with a prescribed amount of moisture.’
    • ‘At the gin, fiber is separated from the seed and cleaned.’
    • ‘This local textile company has had success with its trial crop of cotton and will now be installing a gin to process the raw material as well.’
    • ‘South Africa says the cotton processed in this gin is some of the finest on the African continent.’
  • 2A machine for raising and moving heavy weights.

    • ‘The horse gin was a horse-driven winding machine used to raise coal in tubs or baskets.’
  • 3A snare for catching game.

    • ‘She was rescued by the RSPCA after becoming caught in an illegal gin trap.’
    • ‘This horrific picture shows a cat lying in enormous distress, her front leg severed by a vicious and illegal gin trap.’
    • ‘For the next 33 years he lived in a room under the house and if anyone came near, he speared them with a pitchfork, whacked them over the head with a farming instrument or caught them in a man-sized gin trap.’
    • ‘He added: ‘Anyone we discover setting gin traps, or fen traps illegally, should be warned they could face prosecution.’’
    • ‘A tiled bathroom in an old safari lodge contains a frightening arsenal of confiscated weaponry - machetes, knives, bows and arrows tipped with hammered barbed wire; buffalo-size snares; gin traps powered by car springs.’
    trap, gin, net, noose
    View synonyms

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Treat (cotton) in a gin.

    • ‘But until the recent innovations, the slow ginning rate for upland cotton made it economically infeasible to use anything but saw-gin stands.’
    • ‘So where does it go to sell its harvested, ginned cotton?’
    • ‘The country's largest ginneries were only utilising 24 and 54 per cent of their respective ginning capacity, and only 40 per cent of the seed cotton was ginned into cotton lint.’
    • ‘Producers in south-central Kansas are ginning a crop once unheard of in their state.’
    • ‘The cooperative ginned a record supply of cotton, topping 16,000 bales.’
  • 2Trap (a person or animal) in a gin.

Phrasal Verbs

  • gin someone up

    • Arouse or intensify strong feelings in someone.

      ‘the goal of the convention is to gin up the faithful’
      • ‘He knew when to pick a fight too-when to bait an umpire or tear up a rule book or hurl a third-base bag in order to fire up his team or gin up the fans.’
      • ‘First of all, it gins up the conservative base of the Republican Party.’
      • ‘If they want to gin up their constituents into active resentment of their federal government - they should look elsewhere.’
      • ‘We're headed to the party being given the ability to bring back symbolic issues so they don't have to talk about anything significant, so they can get the base ginned up for these November House and Senate elections.’
      • ‘The magazine was reporting the administration had a three point plan to come back after the debacle which included ginning up the base with tax cuts.’
      • ‘Print and online publications are ginned up to shine an anecdote, an experience, into a gem that will be plucked and dittoed through the social media.’
      • ‘He's more than happy to accept the negative reviews and respond to them in a fashion that gins up his followers and financial contributors.’
      • ‘One would have thought we would have ginned up the intelligence analysts and case officers who were capable of operating in that area.’
      • ‘It's easy for kids to be ginned up at an assembly, but it's hard to work hard for the years and years of years that they must.’
      • ‘She is ginned up about the launch to the point of hyperbole, describing the app as "the most shoppable digital edition of any magazine."’
  • gin something up

    • Generate or increase something, especially by dubious or dishonest means.

      ‘the trade press has ginned up a controversy’
      ‘critics say the program is just a way for big drug companies to gin up demand for their psychiatric drugs’
      • ‘Resentment against supposedly overpaid union workers is too easy to gin up.’
      • ‘First, he has to gin up a pretext.’
      • ‘Corporate boards have essentially created what amounts to a perpetual motion pay machine that year in and year out gins up millions in executive compensation, no matter what may be happening economically in the real world.’
      • ‘He gins up voter turnout.’
      • ‘So four days after the media ginned up this story, it's over.’
      • ‘When the government gins up martial madness, it's hard to put it back in the bottle.’
      • ‘As Congress gins up its attack on women's health services, another issue that affects the welfare of women has been getting far less attention.’
      • ‘No, it gins up bad, sick instincts in people who have these predispositions.’
      • ‘A video going viral is ginning up some over-the-top enthusiasm for trains.’
      • ‘He will use Thursday's event to gin up support via the Internet.’
      • ‘Then someone overreacted and ginned up a phony controversy on this side of the Atlantic and now the very fabric of our culture is threatened.’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense a tool or device, a trick): from Old French engin (see engine).

Pronunciation:

gin

/jin/