Definition of get the hell out (of) in US English:

get the hell out (of)

phrase

informal
  • Escape quickly from (a place or situation)

    ‘let's all get the hell out of here’
    • ‘I turned to port, cranked smartly on the oars, and got the hell out of the ship's way.’
    • ‘My parents didn't want to be caught between that hammer and anvil, so they got the hell out.’
    • ‘North takes his readers to a place most will never have dreamed of going before, or if they have they have quickly got the hell out.’
    • ‘They got the hell out of the country, closed up shop and disappeared.’
    • ‘I realized I had some paperwork in my hand, so I went back to the office and thought, ‘I'm putting this down and getting the hell out of here.’’
    • ‘The good news is that High Command is aware of our situation and our desire to get the hell out of here.’
    • ‘In part this is because I got the hell out quite quickly.’
    • ‘She always liked it when he visited, as it really helped her to get the hell out of her agonizing situation for a short while.’
    • ‘If the government wants to preserve newspapers, the best thing it can do is get the hell out of the way.’
    • ‘Now, if you have any idea at all what's good for you, you will get the hell out of here and never come back.’
    • ‘‘No,’ she said proudly, looking young while she tried on old expressions, ‘I got the hell out on my own.’’
    • ‘Her first instinct was to listen to him and get the hell out of there as quickly as possible, but even as she was about to turn away she knew that escaping was pointless.’
    • ‘There is nothing really stopping me getting the hell out of this situation.’
    • ‘Then the cops showed up and told everyone to get the hell out of there.’
    • ‘Then everyone packed up and got the hell out of there and went back to L.A., which made Jackson very sad.’
    • ‘And everybody is going sell their stock and try their best to get the hell out of there.’
    • ‘I quickly dried my hands, put on the gloves, and got the hell out of there.’
    • ‘He is, after all, only upholding one of the most venerable of British traditions: getting the hell out.’
    • ‘The store was a mess afterward, the only thing I could think of was getting the hell out of there.’
    • ‘All she wanted to do was get this meeting over with, and then hopefully get the hell out of town as quickly as possible.’