Definition of gentrify in English:

gentrify

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Renovate and improve (a house or district) so that it conforms to middle-class taste.

    • ‘The few gentrified streets did once house members of the leftish intelligentsia.’
    • ‘Denver is a newly gentrified metropolitan area surrounded by the rugged, snow-capped Colorado Rockies.’
    • ‘The house had that gentrified look common along the Peacham Road.’
    • ‘The university wanted to put the $125 million, 330,000-square-foot building at the edge of campus, where it would help move the college southward and further gentrify the area.’
    • ‘When the university so gentrifies its immediate neighborhood that store rents there are higher than in the city center, a lesson is taught.’
    • ‘This attracted the yuppies (and the liberal artsy types), who have been slowly gentrifying the town for the past 20 odd years.’
    • ‘The drawback to adding roughly 1,000 new residents a week and gentrifying urban neighborhoods is that Sydney could lose its distinctive flavor and drive out the artists who made those areas appealing.’
    • ‘All of these seem to be part of a wide-ranging plan to gentrify the downtown Cleveland area.’
    • ‘It tells the owner of the development that by gentrifying a run-down area of the city, their speculative accumulation actually has a positive, even indispensable social role.’
    • ‘Regional and local development has often invested in physical resources, such as gentrifying an area with a new museum, art gallery, or library.’
    • ‘City leaders promised solutions, but many of them involved gentrifying poor neighborhoods.’
    • ‘Their regular meeting place was a restaurant smack-dab in the middle of the newly gentrified Times Square.’
    • ‘He has insisted his club will gentrify the deprived north inner-city area around Parnell Street.’
    • ‘Apart from hastily built apartment blocks, there is no real sense of community in any newly gentrified city area.’
    • ‘‘It's getting SoMa-ed,’ says one local, comparing it to the more completely gentrified South of Market district that lies just to the north.’
    • ‘College towns, upscale suburbs, and newly gentrifying urban neighborhoods were indeed becoming Democratic as blue-collar areas moved rightward.’
    • ‘It hardly oozes charm now, although there have been a few attempts to gentrify it.’
    • ‘The city is going to knock down this building and gentrify the neighborhood.’
    • ‘Others worry that the plan is an excuse to gentrify areas that have become valuable in the years since public housing went up.’
    • ‘By the late '70s, graffiti had moved from the trains to the walls, and become a key symbol in the efforts of mayors to gentrify low-income communities of color.’
    modernize, restore, redecorate, refurbish, revamp, make over, recondition, rehabilitate, overhaul, repair, redevelop, rebuild, reconstruct, remodel
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1usually as adjective gentrified Make (someone or their way of life) more refined or polite.
      • ‘Maybe it's because that grouping of people is so out of context these days… or that they look so gentrified almost, so adult, so grown up, so not rock starish.’
      • ‘The actress plays Julia Cook, the gentrified, married English lover of Ned and a fictional character.’
      • ‘JM Synge was born an Englishman and inhabited the same gentrified Anglo-Irish world as Yeats.’
      • ‘You can't expect to be free to work the street in areas used extensively by gentrified yuppies.’
      • ‘You are producing generation after generation of chaps and girls who have a very limited understanding of life experience outside of their own gentrified clique.’
      • ‘In the absence of other candidates, Highland commissions had to be filled up with such men, a less gentrified set than their English counterparts.’
      • ‘Overall, Smith's study in social boorishness stood up to a 40-minute York set, although his gentrified persona occasionally grated, and it would be fascinating to see how he handled a hostile crowd.’
      • ‘The rivalry between a gentrified family and a wealthy tradesman turns to tragedy when the former use their discovery of the dark past of the tradesman's daughter-in-law to thwart his building plans.’
      • ‘People like myself who are long-term residents of the area have themselves become gentrified, and that's really symptomatic of what's happened here as a whole.’
      • ‘The regulars jammed against the bar are part of the young, gentrified crowd who have colonised the inner walls of the City.’
      • ‘The gentrified and artistic world Hesselius's daughters and descendants married into can be traced under the family name, and under ‘Wertmuller.’’

Pronunciation

gentrify

/ˈdʒɛntrəˌfaɪ//ˈjentrəˌfī/