Definition of gentile in English:

gentile

adjective

  • 1Not Jewish.

    ‘Christianity spread from Jewish into Gentile cultures’
    • ‘Of course in early Christianity one of the great struggles between Jewish Christians and Gentile Christians involved the food laws in Judaism.’
    • ‘Why was there controversy about observing the Jewish Sabbath among Jewish and Gentile Christians in the church at Colossae?’
    • ‘One of the challenges for emerging Christianity was defining the relationship between an increasingly Gentile church and Christianity's historic Jewish roots.’
    • ‘Why is it that this Gentile woman understands this, when the Pharisees and the disciples do not?’
    • ‘He wanted to present the play on Broadway and not entirely in Yiddish; after all, he had to keep a wide, largely Gentile audience in mind.’
    • ‘It was important that Galilee was a border area between a predominantly Jewish area and areas with Gentile populations.’
    • ‘Perhaps the most dramatic example we have of this principle of communication and control is the balustrade in the Jerusalem temple which prohibited Gentile access to the court of the Israelites.’
    • ‘The New Testament was written in Greek bringing God's kingdom to the whole Greek speaking Gentile world, as well as the Jews.’
    • ‘The people of the former three had Jews as part of the congregation while the latter were basically Gentile churches.’
    • ‘Jewish and Gentile people did not eat with one another in the first century.’
    • ‘We do know that there was a mixed Jewish and Gentile population in Tiberias.’
    • ‘It became hybridized with so much pagan influence that it ultimately alienated its original Jewish base and became predominantly Gentile.’
    • ‘Despite the taboo of Christian and Gentile mixing, Rebecca insisted that in the matter of caring for the sick, the taboo could be broken.’
    • ‘Throughout the novel, Rubinstein slides between Yiddish-inflected and Gentile slang depending on his level of self-confidence.’
    • ‘The real step forward here, however, is not so much in a deep and detailed understanding of changing Gentile perceptions, but of how Jews internalized those stereotypes.’
    • ‘Consequently, little was said about qualifications for elders until Paul began organizing Gentile churches with the help of Timothy and Titus.’
    • ‘The psalmodic practices of the Jewish diaspora are extremely diverse and manifest varying degrees of relation to the musical traditions of surrounding Gentile cultures.’
    • ‘On many points Jewish and Gentile standards of behaviour were the same.’
    • ‘Mark expected Jewish and Gentile Christians to use however much time remained for the evangelization of the nations.’
    • ‘As we have noted, the association of red wine and blood was common in both the Jewish and the Gentile cultures.’
    1. 1.1 (of a person) not belonging to one's own religious community.
    2. 1.2 (in the Mormon church) non-Mormon.
  • 2Anthropology
    Relating to or indicating a nation or clan, especially a gens.

noun

  • A person who is not Jewish.

    • ‘Both Gentiles and Jews were being invited to enter into this new temple through their acceptance of the gospel message.’
    • ‘Also the congregations in these synagogues were Jews, Gentiles sat outside the main room on one side and the women and children on the other side.’
    • ‘All those rules were terrible but the worst one of all was the one that forbid Gentiles to associate with Jews.’
    • ‘He will, for the very first time, bring unity to the Jews and Gentiles!’
    • ‘Antioch, the capital of the Roman province of Syria, was where the first church was planted among the Gentiles.’
    • ‘By the way, did you know that there really was a wall in the Jewish temple in Jerusalem that divided Jews from Gentiles?’
    • ‘Eventually, it warmed the souls of countless thousands of Jews and Gentiles, throughout the known world.’
    • ‘He had come not just for Israel, but also for the Gentiles!’
    • ‘I think that this information would be of interest to Gentiles as well as Jews.’
    • ‘This emphasis and a focus on redeeming the Gentiles moved the early church away from a land-related agenda.’
    • ‘Even the Gentiles' hearts have been touched by Napoleon's sweet spirit.’
    • ‘Paul knew that Gentiles as well as Jews could live such a faith.’
    • ‘There, it was decided that the Gentiles were not bound to the Jewish Law.’
    • ‘Such preaching will always be a stumbling block, to Gentiles and Jews alike.’
    • ‘Edwards then explains that the purpose of all this was to open a door for the apostles when they came to preach the gospel to the Gentiles.’
    • ‘Traditionally, intermarriage between Jews and Gentiles has been forbidden.’
    • ‘On the other hand, the Gentiles, and the Greeks in particular, were evolutionary in their thinking.’
    • ‘Paul saw the law to be the factor which separated Jews from Gentiles.’
    • ‘Were believing Gentiles indeed fellow heirs of Abraham along with believing Jews?’
    • ‘Again we must say that this was strictly a Jewish affair, no Gentiles being involved; no, not even the Roman guard.’

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin gentilis of a family or nation, of the same clan (used in the Vulgate to refer to non-Jews), from gens, gent- family, race from the root of gignere beget.

Pronunciation:

gentile

/ˈjentīl/