Definition of generation gap in English:

generation gap


  • Differences of outlook or opinion between people of different generations.

    • ‘Their debut album is a piece of rock and roll excellence which is likely to attract a following spanning the generation gap.’
    • ‘In addition, intensifying pressures and the generation gap are also said to influence young people to smoke, as they attempt to vent their frustration.’
    • ‘Meanwhile the group have recruited a number of volunteers who will help to stage a number of activities including sports and possibly events to increase tolerance and bridge the generation gap.’
    • ‘‘I saw a need and decided to bridge the generation gap,’ she said.’
    • ‘In the interview he seems genuinely apologetic, but seemingly still not quite aware of the offence he might have caused, emphasising the generation gap.’
    • ‘It also enables Inuit students to develop their own perspective on the topics investigated and contributes to bridging the generation gap among the Inuit of Nunavut.’
    • ‘He said the Internet is not a problem for the generation gap, and the important thing is that parents should keep studying themselves to win admiration from the children.’
    • ‘Bridging the generation gap is helping to build safer and happier communities.’
    • ‘It was an episode which illustrated the generation gap between the old and the young.’
    • ‘The age difference was a staggering 20 years but on this occasion, as on so many others down the years, talent bridged the generation gap.’
    • ‘But the jobless 36-year-old today claimed that he was a victim of the generation gap between him and his neighbours.’
    • ‘Maybe it's the generation gap on my part, or they just have too much money.’
    • ‘Perhaps in the past there was no need for such an organization, but it fills a void: the generation gap.’
    • ‘First, the generation gap might be more interesting than the gender gap, but it's much less interesting than the ethnic gap in American public opinion.’
    • ‘Introducing the element of fun and safety and successfully bridging the generation gap, the place was a landmark of sorts in the field of entertainment attracting the young.’
    • ‘With the 25-year-old saxophone player part of the troupe, this is one band which has managed to bridge the generation gap.’
    • ‘There was no problem with the generation gap but his grandparents left their own mark on him, and you might call the values he hopes he's inherited old-fashioned ones.’
    • ‘It might even help bridge the generation gap you describe.’
    • ‘Relating to grandparents and vice versa is usually less fraught as the generation gap gives distance.’
    • ‘She felt though both genders shared similarities in the generation gap, there were specific differences between the roles they were keyed to play.’


generation gap

/ˌjenəˈrāSHən ɡap/