Definition of generalcy in US English:

generalcy

noun

  • The rank, office, or tenure of a general.

    • ‘He began that part of his career that was to lead him to the adjutant generalcy and a place of prominence in the history of the new state.’
    • ‘He traces the steady development of Ike's generalcy.’
    • ‘After passing through several desperate campaigns, he rose by promotion to the adjutant generalcy of regiment's corps.’
    • ‘He rendered valuable service to his country, and had he lived, would probably have been recommended by me before this time for a brigadier generalcy.’
    • ‘He then commanded another expedition to punish the Ashanti in West Africa, his capture of their capital at Kumasi in February 1873 being rewarded with his major generalcy.’
    • ‘Awarded a major generalcy for the operations, he was ordered eastward upon creation of the Army of Virginia.’
    • ‘He went to sea as a youth and so distinguished himself that by the time he was 35 he held the captain generalcy of the Indies fleet, which convoyed treasure ships from the New World to Spain.’
    • ‘No wonder was it that when in the war between the states leaders were needed to take command of the raw recruits which flocked to the standard of General Sterling Price to form the Missouri State Guard, he was selected for the command of a regiment from which he rose by rapid promotion to a major generalcy.’
    • ‘He saw a lot of action in his rise to a brigadier generalcy during World War I, but perhaps the toughest fight of his career occurred when he was a second lieutenant and was a sparing partner for James ‘Gentleman Jim’ Corbett, who was preparing for his famous heavyweight title match with John L. Sullivan in 1892.’
    • ‘In 1943 his major generalcy was substantiated (made permanent); and late that August he was given a field command.’
    • ‘Coincident with General Eisenhower's advancement to a permanent major generalcy, the Distinguished Service Medal has been awarded to him with the following citation.’
    • ‘He served in the western theater, where he won a major generalcy by 1863.’
    • ‘With the July 4, 1863, capitulation of the city he was awarded a major generalcy in the regular army.’
    • ‘His main contribution, however, to Britain was his training of light infantry and his military changes earned him a lieutenant generalcy.’
    • ‘He was too much of a gentleman, however, too genial and good-natured, too averse to controversy to agitate for the major generalcy he knew he deserved.’
    • ‘They were put up for brigadier generalcies and he was rewarded with governorship of Sonora.’
    • ‘Having the high rank of lieutenant general, there was no command for him after Vicksburg, so he resigned his lieutenant generalcy to accept an appointment as a colonel in the artillery division.’

Pronunciation

generalcy

/ˈjenərəlsē/