Definition of general court-martial in English:

general court-martial

noun

  • A court-martial for trying serious offenses, consisting of at least five officers with the authority to impose a sentence of dishonorable discharge or death.

    • ‘The officers underneath me are urging I give you a general court-martial and send you on your way, but I want to hear your side.’
    • ‘The investigating officer found reasonable grounds exist that he committed the offenses and recommended trial by general court-martial.’
    • ‘They deserve a general court-martial for these actions.’
    • ‘In March 1815, while New Orleans was still under martial law, he was tried by a general court-martial for a number of alleged offenses, including spying.’
    • ‘He will be tried in a hearing of the general court-martial, the highest-level court among three kinds of courts-martial.’
    • ‘On March 17, 1885, Gustav appeared before a six-member general court-martial, the military's highest disciplinary tribunal.’
    • ‘A typical general court-martial of the 1860s opens with two pages citing the authority by which the court-martial had been convened and gives the names of the thirteen officers appointed to form the trial board.’
    • ‘At a general court-martial the appellants were charged with inflicting grievous bodily harm.’
    • ‘Two commanders of regional readiness commands have even requested and been granted general court-martial convening authority as a test.’
    • ‘The accused was convicted by general court-martial in Clark Air Base in the Philippines with ‘assault with intent to commit murder’.’
    • ‘It was unusual that they were afforded defense counsel and subsequently acquitted because at that time, there was no right to a defense lawyer and there were more than 60 general court-martial convictions for each day of hostilities.’
    • ‘He could order another general court-martial.’
    • ‘A general court-martial was convened for the trial of serious offenses, including capital cases.’
    • ‘Tried by general court-martial in 1970, the sergeant pled guilty to unpremeditated murder.’
    • ‘Today, however, the US commander might have one additional option: try the lieutenant before a US general court-martial.’