Main definitions of gel in English

: gel1gel2

gel1

noun

  • 1A jellylike substance containing a cosmetic, medicinal, or other preparation.

    ‘try rubbing some teething gel onto sore gums’
    ‘hair gel’
    • ‘If the mother produced only eggs, and not the additional protective coats or spacing gel, she could produce up to twice as many.’
    • ‘The clear gel is a skin prep, shaving gel and aftershave lotion.’
    • ‘Do not use irritating, perfumed soaps, shower gel or deodorants.’
    • ‘The objecthood smeared out across the packed gel produces interference patterns, waves.’
    • ‘I was wondering if you could possibly send me any information on your shower gel products.’
    • ‘One particularly effective treatment for comedone acne is available as a cream, gel and lotion.’
    • ‘Even so, I gasped when I felt the cool gel drizzle onto my back.’
    • ‘Possibly he has little complimentary sachets of shampoo and shower gel too.’
    • ‘For this reason they are usually mixed with gel or paste products to keep them in contact with the sealer longer.’
    • ‘It takes approximately 30 seconds to apply the shaving gel and 5 to 7 minutes to shave.’
    • ‘But these warnings are not required on shampoo, shower gel or family bubble bath, all of which can legally contain four times as much formaldehyde.’
    • ‘Gently easing her back onto the comfortable bed she pulled up her top and watched as the cold gel was smothered onto her belly.’
    • ‘The gel can be rubbed onto chrome surfaces where it forms a robust, long-lasting soft film that is virtually colourless.’
    • ‘The gel was applied onto the skin with use of the fingers to apply a slight massage.’
    • ‘In recent days, plenty of baby clothes, diaper-rash ointment, teething gel and strollers have arrived, along with a lot of small checks.’
    • ‘Amy tilted up his face and soothed the cool gel onto his cheekbones with her fingertips.’
    • ‘I also discovered that my nails will be ruined, as they have glued the extensions directly on to them, rather than onto a layer of gel.’
    • ‘I set him down on the counter and then grabbed my shave gel out of the medicine cabinet.’
    • ‘They can already produce moulded gel implants and are now looking for a hospital whose surgeons are unhappy with silicone implants.’
    • ‘I squeezed some shampoo gel onto my hands and rubbed them quickly together, making lather.’
    1. 1.1Chemistry
      A semisolid colloidal suspension of a solid dispersed in a liquid.
    2. 1.2Biochemistry
      A semirigid slab or cylinder of an organic polymer used as a medium for the separation of macromolecules.

verb

[NO OBJECT]Chemistry
  • 1 Form into a gel.

    ‘the mixture gelled at 7 degrees Celsius’
    • ‘The gelatin mixture was allowed to gel at 4°C protected from light.’
    • ‘Root starches do not gel, and generally the cold paste remains comparatively clear.’
    1. 1.1[with object]Treat (the hair) with gel.
      • ‘After my shower I gelled my hair and got dressed.’
      • ‘He then turned to the mirror and gelled his hair down smooth.’
      • ‘His blonde hair was gelled and he smelled of cologne.’
      • ‘He's soon shifting styles, painting his suit jacket up and gelling his hair into a spike.’
      • ‘His hair wasn't gelled, and it was barely combed.’
      • ‘His blonde hair was forever gelled into spikes and he had a dangerous way of listening that made me feel like what I was saying was something he had wanted to hear all his life.’
      • ‘I took my shower, gelled my hair, and put on a tux.’
      • ‘The light reflected off of his slick, gelled brown hair.’
      • ‘His dirty blonde hair was gelled and styled perfectly.’
      • ‘His wood brown hair was gelled into spikes as usual and not a hair dared to venture out of place.’
      • ‘I gelled my hair so it would keep its messily spiked style and grabbed a beaded hemp necklace that one of my friends had made for me off the bathroom counter.’
      • ‘He had straight, dark hair that was gelled into spikes.’
      • ‘Her blue-blonde hair was gelled in its usual pixie look.’
      • ‘He was dressed in an Elvis outfit, and his hair was gelled up.’
      • ‘His dark brown hair was gelled into a messy sort of look.’
      • ‘His hair was gelled, showing his natural curls.’
      • ‘My hair was gelled back (following the precise instructions of my ‘date’ for the night) and I was wearing a tuxedo.’
      • ‘His hair had been gelled to perfection, and he looked steaming hot.’
      • ‘Since I never cut my hair yesterday, I tried gelling my hair into center parting.’
      • ‘His usually messy hair was gelled up into spikes and he reeked of aftershave.’

Origin

Late 19th century: abbreviation of gelatin.

Pronunciation:

gel

/jel/

Main definitions of gel in English

: gel1gel2

gel2

verb

British
  • variant spelling of jell
    • ‘He's gelling an entire scene - which makes it hard to blame him for mixing up a name or two once in a while.’
    • ‘Once again, without any rehearsal these actors just gelled for that time and space.’
    • ‘The images do indeed feel flat, and the colours feel a bit more intense than they should, but this gels very nicely indeed with the enormous, barren landscape of Nunavut.’
    • ‘But we also had complementing talents - we quickly gelled.’
    • ‘This sextet was so talented that they gelled as a cohesive unit immediately.’
    • ‘Once these things gel in the minds of the kewl kid chatterers it's almost impossible to get them to revise it.’
    • ‘This gels neatly with the optimum one-to-zero child per caregiver.’
    • ‘I think a D.J. is somebody who entertains, who gels with the audience.’
    • ‘He tried to write novels, but they failed to gel - or get published.’
    • ‘They come up with story lines, and take out hands that don't gel with the story line.’
    • ‘Despite the glaring physical clash, you also get the feel that they gel in the photos.’
    • ‘This does not gel with this great prosperity that we're having, does it, Ed?’
    • ‘I think - first of all, I think it was just a wonderful, wonderful something that we three gelled so well.’
    • ‘Finally starting to gel, this is the best album they have released.’

Origin

Late 19th century: from gel.

Pronunciation:

gel

/jel/