Definition of gavel-to-gavel in English:

gavel-to-gavel

adjective

  • Lasting from beginning to end of a formal session or meeting, such as a political convention.

    ‘uninterrupted gavel-to-gavel coverage without commentary’
    • ‘The network plans gavel-to-gavel coverage from the convention floor, as it has in the past.’
    • ‘It's a gavel-to-gavel overview of his career, from his Hank Williams-worshipping 50s material through his redneck 70s stuff, stopping for a long interlude in the 60s, when he was at the peak of his songwriting and singing powers.’
    • ‘His network DID provide gavel-to-gavel coverage - but only via the Internet.’
    • ‘Despite the apparent public apathy toward online convention coverage, all of the network TV websites and a dozen or so other political sites and e-zines continued to devour enormous amounts of bandwidth with gavel-to-gavel webcasts.’
    • ‘If viewers weren't tuned to C-SPAN for the gavel-to-gavel coverage, then they missed the excitement and the energy and the brilliant remarks by them.’
    • ‘On the contrary: 24-hour, gavel-to-gavel, non-stop coverage of the scandal will pre-empt more or less all other news stories for the indefinite future.’
    • ‘This year, both announced that they plan to give full gavel-to-gavel coverage of both conventions on the Internet and selected prime time television coverage.’
    • ‘Four days of gavel-to-gavel convention watching have reminded me, a professional speaker, of the difference between bad, mediocre, good, and great speechifying.’
    • ‘We had this powerful brand initially, which was live coverage, gavel-to-gavel coverage, establishing our crime-and-justice branding.’
    • ‘It's unedited, gavel-to-gavel coverage of the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs, Northern Development and Natural Resources.’
    • ‘It brought home to millions the excitement of gavel-to-gavel coverage of the presidential nominating conventions.’
    • ‘But I don't think on general broadcast news we're going to see a lot of gavel-to-gavel coverage.’
    • ‘It's their turn to provide gavel-to-gavel coverage of a national political convention as Democrats gather in Los Angeles this week.’
    • ‘It doesn't have the same kind of hard news value that required the networks to give it three hours of gavel-to-gavel coverage.’
    • ‘It began slowly, with the emergence of C-SPAN and gavel-to-gavel House floor coverage in 1979.’
    • ‘It's no secret that the TV broadcast networks put the Republicans on a kind of starvation diet, only a slice or two of coverage during prime time, nothing like the gavel-to-gavel banquet of once upon a time.’
    • ‘But the political game has changed, the media business is more unforgiving, and the old gavel-to-gavel, backroom-dealing, anything-can-happen convention is a distant memory.’
    • ‘So remove the networks' gavel-to-gavel Watergate-style coverage (those Watergate months were the most warming and wonderful television experience of my life) from the tale.’
    • ‘One of its station groups offers gavel-to-gavel reporting on the South Carolina General Assembly.’
    • ‘There was a time when this event prompted gavel-to-gavel TV coverage.’