Main definitions of gall in English

: gall1gall2gall3

gall1

noun

  • 1Bold, impudent behavior.

    ‘the bank had the gall to demand a fee’
    • ‘I think we should have an awed silence in honour of the sheer unbelievable gall of that one.’
    • ‘I can't believe we have such ungrateful whiners in this place that have the hide and gall to call themselves Aussies.’
    • ‘But, if his responses to past adversity are an accurate guide, long-term suffering will be felt only by those with gall enough to challenge the depth of his current supremacy.’
    • ‘The piece is written with an almost amused incredulity at the sheer gall of the scheme.’
    • ‘I looked furiously from her to the one who'd had enough gall to do this.’
    • ‘This boy obviously had a lot of gall, threatening and challenging him like this.’
    • ‘‘You always have such gall,’ she stated trying to avoid looking at his face.’
    • ‘I mustered up enough gall to snatch the rose from his spinning fingers, toss it away, and interlace my fingers with his own.’
    • ‘What the French lack in reason they make up for in sheer gall.’
    • ‘In hockey terms, spine is guts, grit, gumption and gall.’
    • ‘The defendant then has the unmitigated gall to blame his recent bankruptcy on these court proceedings.’
    • ‘‘If nothing else you have gall,’ he nodded and she gave a Cheshire smile to the offhanded compliment as he lit his cigar, the smell of it immediately coming to her attention.’
    • ‘Never once did she remind him that she was his prized assassin, the only female with enough gall to commit repetitive and senseless acts of violence.’
    • ‘And then, somebody had the unmitigated gall to shop those tapes around to media outlets in order to sell them to the highest bidder.’
    • ‘You really have a lot of gall, Mackenzie, to come right up and say all these things.’
    • ‘You almost have to admire the sheer gall of it all.’
    • ‘I wasn't there fault that they did realize that things had changed not that it didn't keep her from dusting them for sheer gall of trying to attack her.’
    • ‘To legislate for artistic imagination is an intellectual conceit that for sheer gall takes the breath away.’
    • ‘What a hat full of horsefeathers; what a hoary hunk of chutzpah; what a grotesque, galloping glob of gall this guy is!’
    • ‘I have been in politics a while - not long enough, obviously - but I have been in politics a while and I have seen some examples of impertinence, cheek, and gall, but that last speech beats them all.’
    impudence, insolence, impertinence, cheek, cheekiness, nerve, audacity, brazenness, effrontery, temerity, presumption, presumptuousness, brashness, shamelessness, pertness, boldness
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  • 2The contents of the gallbladder; bile (proverbial for its bitterness)

    • ‘In central Ontario, eight species of parasitoids and a Periclistus inquiline are associated with this gall.’
    • ‘It is said to be the fish with whose gall Tobit recovered his sight, although it seems improbable that a fish of this species should have leapt out of the River Tigris.’
    • ‘Raphael helped him to catch a fish, the heart, liver and gall of which were used by Tobias to drive away a demon and cure his father's blindness.’
    • ‘The result of Raychel's beating is directly carried over to the Roman soldier forcing Jesus to drink gall.’
    • ‘And when they were come unto a place called Golgotha, that is to say, a place of a skull, They gave Him Vinegar to drink mingled with gall: and when He had tasted thereof, He would not drink.’
    • ‘There they offered Jesus wine to drink, mixed with gall; but after tasting it, he refused to drink it.’
    • ‘They gave Him sour wine mingled with gall to drink.’
    acrimony, resentment, rancour, sourness, acerbity, asperity
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    1. 2.1An animal's gallbladder.
      • ‘Dried and sold as an aphrodisiac and cure-all in Asia, Russia, and North America, bear gall has long been treasure for poachers.’
      • ‘They gave me also gall for my meat; and in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.’
      • ‘Whoever killed Russell's bears was not out poaching gall, Pavel believed.’
    2. 2.2Used to refer to something bitter or cruel.
      ‘accept life's gall without blaming somebody else’
      • ‘It's always a bit crushing when you lose something that was yours but there is a special bitter gall when that thing is logging your progress in a 10,000 a day stepathon.’
      • ‘How quickly I fall back to my evil ways when I force You to drink the bitter gall of mankind's sin - instead of refreshing water that will temporarily soothe Your thirsty and battered body.’

Origin

Old English gealla (denoting bile), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch gal, German Galle gall from an Indo-European root shared by Greek kholē and Latin fel bile.

Pronunciation:

gall

/ɡôl/

Main definitions of gall in English

: gall1gall2gall3

gall2

noun

  • 1Annoyance; irritation.

    ‘he imagined Linda's gall as she found herself still married and not rich’
    • ‘Learning that his quarry had given him a slip a glowering devil seemed to rage within the king's heart, raising dark and savage gall.’
    irritation, irritant, annoyance, vexation, pest, nuisance, provocation, bother, torment, plague, source of vexation, source of irritation, source of annoyance, thorn in one's flesh, thorn in one's side
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  • 2(especially of a horse) a sore on the skin made by chafing.

    sore, ulcer, ulceration, canker
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verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Make (someone) feel annoyed.

    ‘he knew he was losing, and it galled him’
    • ‘It galled him that soldiers had driven so hard to penetrate the city, only to have a buffoon in a beret belittle them to the world.’
    • ‘Given the phrasing, it's difficult not to suspect that he was galled to discover that he was no more popular than a writer who, at that stage in her career, had published only a small volume of poems and a children's book.’
    • ‘But what really galls me is when the marketers target children.’
    • ‘And even though it will gall us as a community to accept the killers of a Garda strutting around as free as birds after being found guilty by the courts just a few years ago, we will have to bite our tongues and keep going.’
    • ‘And it just galls me that the Republicans are always talking about two things, Christianity and family values.’
    • ‘What is galling most people about the situation is that it was instigated by our own Minister who seems to be blaming everyone from his own Fisheries Officers, Europe and fishermen's so called lack of flexibility.’
    • ‘What really galls me is that services for elderly people are woeful - disgraceful in fact - and these are people who have paid taxes all their lives.’
    • ‘What really galls me is that the French have their Foreign Legion and don't give a damn.’
    • ‘But what galls me is that it promised all these sickening smells would be a thing of the past when the incinerator was built.’
    • ‘London is a wonderful city and it galls me that I don't make the most of it.’
    • ‘It galls me that I'm able to say things like ‘Fifteen years ago, I won a trip to Washington DC’ and I'm able to remember it as clearly as yesterday, even though it was almost half-my-life ago.’
    • ‘It galls me that some people are trying to take full credit for the new hospital now.’
    • ‘That's what galls me more than anything: the continual condemnation of young people to means-testing, division and poor nutrition.’
    • ‘And it's principle, not money, that's galling him.’
    • ‘What galls me more, I guess, than American fast food culture and all that this entails is the bullying, we're right you're wrong and we'll fight you for it attitude.’
    • ‘Yes indeed, and clearly that's galling the people who are holding those three Italian hostages, originally four.’
    • ‘What also galls me is that these women are claiming not only sex, but femininity itself as a uniformly passive, gentle, loving, pacifist attribute.’
    • ‘But I'm most galled by the inaccuracy of how the study's results are misleadingly characterized.’
    • ‘The article implies that there is no active company, which is an insult to the hard work of my contracted roster of singers, and that is what really galls me the most.’
    • ‘What galls him most, Boris says, is that he would gladly have worked off his fines through community service, but the city denied him this option.’
    irritate, annoy, vex, make angry, make cross, anger, exasperate, irk, pique, put out, displease, get someone's back up, put someone's back up, antagonize, get on someone's nerves, rub up the wrong way, ruffle, ruffle someone's feathers, make someone's hackles rise, raise someone's hackles
    View synonyms
  • 2Make sore by rubbing.

    ‘the straps galled their shoulders’
    chafe, abrade, rub painfully, rub raw, scrape, graze, skin, scratch, rasp, bark, fret
    View synonyms

Origin

Old English gealle sore on a horse perhaps related to gall; superseded in Middle English by forms from Middle Low German or Middle Dutch.

Pronunciation:

gall

/ɡôl/

Main definitions of gall in English

: gall1gall2gall3

gall3

noun

  • 1An abnormal growth formed on plants and trees, especially oaks, in response to the presence of insect larvae, mites, or fungi.

    • ‘The midge is an ephemeral 2-3 mm insect whose larva induces a gall on young unfurled S. viminalis leaves.’
    • ‘In the spring I saw some old blackened pods and thought they were insect galls.’
    • ‘In early spring, these aphids form pouch-shaped galls on the hybrids' leaves; living and breeding within the galls, the insects feed on the trees' nutritious sap stream.’
    • ‘About twenty species in the deserts of Australia occupy galls, plant tissues that have been modified by feeding insects to form a hollow cavity.’
    • ‘She held out her gnarled hands, as twisted and brown as the galls of a walnut tree.’
    • ‘Leaves, flowers, roots, fruits, twigs, and insect galls can also be employed as medicine.’
    • ‘Damage to leaves caused by insects appears widespread and includes traces of feeding, leaf mines and galls.’
    • ‘Herbivorous attack was estimated by the number of attacked leaves and percentage of leaf area damaged, while gall-forming insect attacks were estimated from the number of leaves with galls and number of galls per individual plant.’
    • ‘This orange gelatinous material, which contains thousands of spores, oozes out of chocolate-colored galls present on affected branches.’
    • ‘When the larvae hatch, they feed inside the shoots, causing the plant to produce galls about the size of a large marble.’
    • ‘At one time it was believed that the bacterium lived in the soil like its relative that causes galls on other plants.’
    • ‘The damage includes feeding traces, predominantly continuous marginal feeding traces, leaf mines including linear and possible blotch varieties and probable leaf galls.’
    • ‘Foliar galls probably caused by mites also have been recognized on one gymnosperm species in the formation.’
    • ‘They will also eat small fruits, berries, and plant galls.’
    • ‘None of the Fort Severn galls issued inhabitants; however, the presence of galls confirms that the species can survive here.’
    • ‘But for aphids living inside plant galls, the risk of getting stuck or even drowning in their own sticky waste is quite real.’
    • ‘Insect galls are likely to be resource sinks, drawing nutrients from other tissues of the host plant in addition to its own leaf.’
    • ‘The female gall fly lays her eggs in young buds, causing the plant to form galls.’
    • ‘The flies' larvae build galls within the flower buds and steal some of the plant's energy, leading to a reduction in the number of seeds that develop.’
    • ‘Among the garden plants with interesting diseases seen recently were clematis affected by a microscopic rust fungus which caused huge galls on the stem, and a disfiguring pathogenic algae on Hardenburgia, an ornamental climber.’
    1. 1.1[as modifier]Denoting insects or mites that produce galls.
      ‘gall flies’
      • ‘For example, some plant clones attract more gall insects while at the same time some clones produce bigger galls, reducing the accessibility of larvae inside to natural enemies.’
      • ‘Pests particularly destructive to Norway spruce include gall aphids, white pine weevil, spider mites, Cytospora canker and Rhizosphaera needlecast.’
      • ‘The physically anchored genetic map is the first of any gall midge species.’
      • ‘However, this parasitoid was completely absent from all sampled gall beetle populations.’
      • ‘To combat it, agricultural agencies began to introduce gall flies of the genus Urophoro in the 1970s.’
      • ‘Biological control agent number three is the melaleuca bud gall fly, Fergusonina turneri, which may prove effective in attacking melaleuca flower and leaf buds but in an entirely different way.’
      • ‘We will refer to these host-associated gall fly populations as ‘altissima’ flies and ‘gigantea’ flies.’
      • ‘In Montana, gall flies released to limit knapweed turn out to provide a food bonanza for white-footed mice.’
      • ‘In this paper, we report on how the formation of galls by the goldenrod gall fly has promoted a host shift and differentiation of the beetle Mordellistena convicta.’
      • ‘The stem gall nematode, Anguina pacificae, is presently the most devastating pest of Poa annua putting greens in California.’
      • ‘The Cape ivy gall fly, Parafreutreta regalis, lays eggs in the tips of stems, where vines and leaves would normally develop.’
      • ‘If so, gall flies attacking S. canadensis may be under selection for earlier emergence.’
      • ‘His team was the first to single out the insect, nicknamed the ‘melaleuca bud gall fly’ as a potential natural control of the aggressive melaleuca.’
      • ‘I chose gall insects, made drawings and sent in specimens with my essay.’
      • ‘More recently, the gall midge has moved into the Houston area and become a cause of bud drop.’

Origin

Middle English: via Old French from Latin galla.

Pronunciation:

gall

/ɡôl/