Definition of galantine in English:

galantine

noun

  • A dish of white meat or fish that is boned, cooked, pressed, and served cold in aspic.

    • ‘Terrines, galantines, and ballotines are perhaps the most familiar examples of the barding technique in the classical kitchen.’
    • ‘The Cuisinier Royale et Bourgeois itself offers a rather appetizing recipe for suckling pig in galantine, but nothing for chicken.’
    • ‘One clear differentiator is that galantines are served cold and ballotines are served hot.’
    • ‘Not even the greenery of a little garden is lacking, for the timbales are decorated with parsley and the galantines with dill.’
    • ‘This course focuses on the preparation and presentation of first course items, highlighting a variety of classical, traditional, regional, ethnic, and modern charcuterie products including terrines, pâtés, galantines, ballotines, and other forcemeats, with accompanying garnishes and sauces.’
    • ‘Proficiencies in sausage-making, garde manger, pates, terrines, galantines and stuffed meats are also taught.’
    • ‘The menu was galantine, one of her favorites, which her mum could cook really well.’
    • ‘Dishes that resemble paella, cocida, galantines, and relleno (batter-fried) can be found in these areas.’
    • ‘Burgers are easy to make, galantine of chicken rather less so.’
    • ‘In a strong chicken stock at a simmer, poach the galantine slowly for 15 to 20 minutes until cooked through.’
    • ‘Then pour in the 2 cups of broth and gently place the galantine in the baking dish.’
    • ‘Remove the sewing thread from the cold galantine before garnishing and serving it.’
    • ‘When done, the galantine must be allowed to become partially cold in its own stock, in order that it may thus preserve its mellowness and flavour.’
    • ‘Kevin's understated presentations and flavors find their way into simple, unpretentious roulades, risottos, and galantines that never crowd the palate, or the plate, with too many fussy flavors.’
    • ‘This course introduces you to canapés, hot and cold hors d' oeuvre, appetizers, forcemeats, pâtés, galantines, terrines, salads, and sausages.’
    • ‘Further back still, before developing into the name of a sauce, galantine had meant simply the jellied juices of fish or meat.’
    • ‘Indulge in our selection of international and domestic cheeses, galantines and pates, array of smoked and cured seafood, salads, carved-to-order meats, hot specialties and of course, a bounty of delectable desserts!’

Origin

Middle English (in the sense sauce for fish): from Old French, alteration of galatine, from medieval Latin galatina; the current sense dates from the early 18th century.

Pronunciation:

galantine

/ˈɡalənˌtēn/