Definition of fuss in English:

fuss

noun

  • 1A display of unnecessary or excessive excitement, activity, or interest.

    ‘I don't know what all the fuss is about’
    • ‘They display the sort of heightened fuss and control typical of a man likely to fly apart at any moment.’
    • ‘The management accepted the payment wanting to resolve the matter without excess fuss before the guests checked out.’
    • ‘This video shows what happened in Atlanta that is causing all the worry and fuss.’
    • ‘That was the whole dream - no excitement, no fuss, no great drama.’
    • ‘This ludicrous fuss epitomises our confused attitude to official mourning.’
    • ‘And who is likely to benefit from all the fuss and excitement?’
    • ‘And why, in this case, is there so much fuss over a performer who happens to be white when his lyrical content has been the stock-in-trade of black rappers for a decade and more?’
    • ‘Nothing much ever happens, the inhabitants just get on with everyday life with the minimum of fuss, stress and excitement.’
    • ‘So that in that sense, there was quite a bit of fuss about it at the time, but once the interviews aired, that particular controversy disappeared.’
    • ‘In the beginning there was so much flurry and fuss.’
    • ‘It's all a lot of fuss and nonsense got up by some pesky civil rights activists, some of whom you can find here at Stand.’
    • ‘‘There is no room in my life for drugs, fights, divorce, adultery, sadism, unnecessary fuss and sex,’ he says now.’
    • ‘She appeared bored, and I knew she thought I was making a lot of unnecessary fuss.’
    • ‘A cheque submitted without fuss or fanfare would prove their real commitment to the cause but would not, of course, garner as many gushing puff pieces or adoring photographs.’
    • ‘I am still struggling to take it in but the amount of fuss around me tells me that something pretty damned big has happened!’
    • ‘The St Lucian policeman saw her through customs without any fuss, then delivered her to another man in a big car outside the airport compound: her employer.’
    • ‘However, I don't recall any fuss being made about the over-fishing of North Sea Cod to the degree that there are probably less cod left than there are whales.’
    • ‘Greenough Shire Council agreed to invest $100,000 in a tourism project on Wednesday with little fuss or confusion.’
    • ‘A lot of unnecessary fuss is being created about the registration procedure required under the bill.’
    • ‘After that initial fuss and confusion things calmed down a bit.’
    ado, excitement, agitation, uproar, to-do, stir, commotion, confusion, disturbance, tumult, hubbub, rigmarole, folderol, brouhaha, furore, storm in a teacup, much ado about nothing
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    1. 1.1 A protest or dispute of a specified degree or kind.
      ‘he didn't put up too much of a fuss’
      • ‘This ‘guardian’ of the environment wasn't even sacked, only suspended (until the fuss died down).’
      • ‘If 20 tonnes of highly radioactive liquefied uranium and plutonium fuel had leaked out of a reprocessing system you'd think there might be a bit of a fuss wouldn't you?’
      • ‘My understanding is you'd like an outside reader's appraisal of its academic merit, as there's been a bit of a fuss about it over there at Athabasca University.’
      • ‘His analysis is that British socialism took a wrong turn in the 1940s, and that the fuss between private and public sector has no place in a party concerned about the ordinary person.’
      • ‘One woman took up 4 reserved seats with her family and caused a huge fuss when asked to move.’
      • ‘There's been a media fuss over the use of animals in this circus, but it seems misplaced.’
      • ‘In the application that Opel gave to the court, a huge fuss is being made about naming names.’
      • ‘Insiders revealed that the handsome star was left with no choice but to retract his complaint quickly returned to work without a fuss.’
      • ‘They caused a little fuss, but were soon subdued.’
      • ‘I strongly suspect, although I do not know, that most of the people kicking up the fuss are Protestant or Jewish.’
      • ‘When a player raises a fuss about his contract, he's considered a malcontent.’
      • ‘This idea was soon quashed as Len didn't want a fuss, and besides it would clash with Rotary's Henley-on-Todd and he had to be there to hand out certificates.’
      • ‘I made a big fuss and I was rewarded with a FREE dye job.’
      • ‘If I had not caused a fuss, it's possible I wouldn't have received it at all.’
      • ‘Part of this revolution was the news that professional footballers should eat lots of pasta and get to bed early, information that most of them could have got from their parents without all the fuss.’
      • ‘Don't really see why everyone kicks up such a fuss about how dangerous it is - there's clearly no danger at all, and I certainly haven't become hooked, either.’
      • ‘I don't think so (both because I don't think I made much of a fuss, and because there is a real issue here).’
      • ‘People are forced to take to the streets, organise petitions, write letters and generally make a proper fuss in protest.’
      • ‘The problem was, I think, that we were arriving at what was probably the back end of it all and that residents of the area had started kicking up a bit of a fuss at being invaded on a yearly basis by hordes of the great unwashed.’
      protest, complaint, objection
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    2. 1.2 Elaborate or complex procedures; trouble or difficulty.
      ‘they settled in with very little fuss’
      • ‘Finished one column this morning; composed the other on the way to work, and banged it out with a minimum of fuss and second guessing.’
      • ‘Comfortable and with the minimum of fuss, St Louis had done more than enough to seal their place in the decider against St Columb's of Derry.’
      • ‘From this point on, the bypass was completed with relatively little fuss.’
      • ‘It names each track, adds it to your library and lets you rate each song or add it to your own folders without any fuss.’
      • ‘There is the strong, silent type, quite happy quietly to immerse himself in his novel environment, settling in gradually with a minimum of fuss.’
      • ‘It must be done with the minimum of fuss, but with a broad range of dishes and a good selection of wines.’
      • ‘Basically, it does exactly what it says on the tin with the minimum of fuss and hassle.’
      • ‘This is partly because I specifically chose a fairly straightforward, low-stress place so I can pursue my volunteer training with minimum fuss.’
      • ‘In a sector full of uncertainty, false starts and expensive delays, their aim is to design and complete attractive commercial enterprises with the minimum of fuss.’
      • ‘With the minimum of fuss, two masseurs, working in unison, applied hot medicated oils over my body and set about the task of coaxing the knots out of my protesting muscles.’
      • ‘The top-weight shrugged of his impost with the minimum of fuss, easing into the lead with less than four furlongs to go and then scampering away for a seven lengths success.’
      • ‘Well, we should expect our electrical appliances to become even more sophisticated - tailored to helping us do many of our domestic duties with minimum fuss.’
      • ‘We want you to be able to find your way around the newspaper with ease; to be able to locate a particular article or feature story with the minimum fuss.’
      • ‘The 29-year-old has slotted into Anderson's team with a minimum of fuss after eight months out of football with an Achilles injury.’
      • ‘When it's his turn to head up on stage for his sound and lighting check pre-show, he strolls up with minimum of fuss, his guitar the only accompaniment to his outfit of jeans and a loose dark jumper.’
      • ‘Everyone knows that using gas appliances is better for the environment, and now there's a local business that can look after all your gas needs with a minimum of fuss.’
      • ‘However, it is simple to mix and may conveniently be started the night before with a minimum of fuss needed to complete it the next day.’
      • ‘Incidents of civil disobedience are now jointly orchestrated by participants and police so they can be carried out with minimum fuss.’
      • ‘They'll all get you from A to B with a minimum of fuss.’
      • ‘Trevor always made them feel welcome in his bank and sorted out their problems with the minimum of fuss, winning him many new and satisfied customers.’
      bother, trouble, inconvenience, effort, exertion, labour
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verb

[NO OBJECT]
  • 1Show unnecessary or excessive concern about something.

    ‘she's always fussing about her food’
    • ‘He pulled his old work boots on over his socks, he kept his socks clean because she'd always fussed over him getting a cold from wet socks.’
    • ‘I fussed and worried and finally I pressed the send button.’
    • ‘Even in 2004, though, babies will still cry and demand things and parents will worry and fuss over them, and I intend to maintain that tradition.’
    • ‘He treated me like a daughter he never had, fussing and worrying about me.’
    • ‘They were fussing over how worried they'd been.’
    • ‘My lovely wife fussed and fretted and told me not to move.’
    • ‘The young nurse is fussing over her husband, who always looks distant and bored.’
    • ‘He's a real pain because he's always fussing annoyingly about books and cars and his appearance, but my friends think he's cool.’
    • ‘Mrs. Ellis is the traditional mother hen, always fussing over her little brood.’
    • ‘It's just that, because she's always been there; fussing and cleaning and polishing, I don't even think about what happens to those mud-stains.’
    • ‘Gatherings such as this always made him fuss unusually about his appearance, when he normally did not care.’
    • ‘My Aunt pointed out to me that we always fuss over Dad, but Mum's health isn't great, and it suffers along with my Dad's when something is wrong with him.’
    • ‘But hardly anyone has fussed about a more practical concern: Some of the more elaborate plate designs make it difficult to read the tag numbers.’
    • ‘Phil was, at some times, much like an obsessive nanny, always fussing over the cleanliness of the house.’
    • ‘He said that fretting and fussing about rural housing is a very superficial symptom of a much greater and far deeper change the collapse of agriculture.’
    • ‘She pulled weeds that threatened to grow and fussed over the flowers that were about to bloom.’
    • ‘There's no lawn to mow, no billowy shrubs to prune, few flowers to fuss over.’
    • ‘To spend a few days among the Olympic footballers was to see plainly that the Argentinians enjoyed the democracy of it more than, say, the Italian squad, some of whom fussed about transport and food.’
    • ‘The ‘sick room’ in our house always had a boarder, over whom my mother would fuss endlessly, soothing a real or imagined fever.’
    • ‘Well, as all offspring know, it is difficult to be assertive with a determined older parent who tells one to stop fussing unnecessarily.’
    worry, fret, be agitated, be worried, take pains, make a big thing out of
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    1. 1.1 Move around or busy oneself restlessly.
      ‘beside him Kelly was fussing with sheets of paper’
      • ‘She sat down at the dressing table, the maid fussing with her hair.’
      • ‘I screamed and tried to fight, crying in frustration while doctors frantically fussed around me, shouting noises that echoed through my head.’
      • ‘Betsy was fussing with the thick curls, artfully twisting them around her fingers to form short ringlets.’
      • ‘Rosa was called to brush my hair dry and Inga fussed around finding a dress that she considered suitable.’
      • ‘Helen fussed with the sheets on Lee's bed, and then followed Frank to Robert's room.’
      • ‘The puppy fussed with a sheet wrinkle; Mary straightened his sheets in a motherly fashion.’
      • ‘After that, waiters in bow ties get busy fussing with silverware and bringing on the hot courses.’
      • ‘I fussed around with buying new glasses at all the major chains, to no success.’
      • ‘She fussed with her hair, make-up and dress making sure everything was perfect.’
      • ‘But the dormouse went fussing about anyway, straightening and re-arranging.’
      • ‘After all, aren't there innumerable warnings out there about how easy it is to mess up your computer by fussing with the registry?’
      • ‘She bustled around, fussing and fiddling with her clothes.’
      • ‘You can fuss a little with the lunge whip to move the horse forward but the most important driving aid or pressure is the position of your primary line.’
      • ‘They fussed around, re-arranging the altar boys and plumping the bishops' cushions.’
      • ‘They fussed around, making sure we were comfortable, as we set to work on the red leather-bound menu.’
      • ‘The woman with the walker, obviously the mother, fusses a bit with the walker, unsure whether to lean on it or push it over in the direction of one of the daughters, the one who is now folding away her sunglasses as she speaks.’
      bustle, dash, rush, scurry, charge, fly
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    2. 1.2British with object Disturb or bother (someone)
      ‘when she cries in her sleep, try not to fuss her’
      • ‘It does not fuss me one way or tother, but if they are truly confidential I will want them uplifted and removed.’
      pester, disturb, harass
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Phrases

  • make a fuss

    • Become angry and complain.

      • ‘It seems to be one of the rules of life nowadays that those who want to get something done have to make a fuss, and keep on making a fuss.’
      • ‘Denial will tell you to relax: Hey, don't make a fuss, don't embarrass yourself by sounding a false alarm.’
      • ‘‘Someone made a fuss and they finally began picking us up in the canyon,’ she said.’
      • ‘Well if you did make a fuss you might find that there are more people that have the same idea about religion as you do.’
      • ‘So if your child makes a fuss or is crying, don't be embarrassed and don't worry about what people might be thinking.’
      • ‘He added: ‘She's a person who hates making a fuss about ill health.’’
      • ‘Because I then felt, as a result of making a fuss, or complaining, or wishing to seek that the situation be addressed, I then suffered victimisation.’
      • ‘If the bombing had happened in Liverpool the inhabitants would be out in the street, moaning and wailing and making a fuss.’
      • ‘ACT's response is that she shouldn't have made a fuss or complained, for fear of damaging the party.’
      • ‘And yet no one here makes a fuss about the non-constitutionality of it all.’
      grumble, complain, moan, groan, protest, whine, bleat, carp, cavil, lodge a complaint, make a complaint, make a fuss
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  • make a fuss over

    • Treat (a person or animal) with excessive attention or affection.

      ‘she hated it when people made a fuss over her’
      • ‘He made sure there was food and water there for me and he always spoke kindly to me, made a fuss over me.’
      • ‘And she's always loved to be cuddled and nursed and made a fuss of by her parents.’
      • ‘‘She's quiet and quite shy, and loves to be stroked and made a fuss of,’ said owner Margaret Brown.’
      • ‘What really bothered me was that he didn't seem too surprised that his mother wasn't taking much notice of him - mind you, he had his daddy making a fuss over him, which is something that happens about a millionth as much as I'd like.’
      • ‘I was thoroughly pampered and made a fuss of, and although I'm not quite sure how I got so lucky or deserving, I loved every minute of it.’
      • ‘I'm no canine expert, but I know that when your dog is inconsolably terrified due to random fireworks exploding around your house, the worse thing you can do is make a fuss of them as you are inadvertently praising the behaviour.’
      • ‘Mealtimes seem to be a particular success, with some residents inviting children to sit at their tables and making a fuss of them.’
      • ‘She never wanted people to make a fuss over her, although she loved to make a fuss over them.’
      • ‘He always used to play with her and make a fuss of her - and she used to play with his mask sometimes.’
      • ‘Nor does he display too much affection or make a fuss over them.’

Origin

Early 18th century: perhaps Anglo-Irish.

Pronunciation

fuss

/fəs//fəs/