Definition of fur in English:

fur

noun

  • 1The short, fine, soft hair of certain animals.

    ‘a long, lean, muscular cat with sleek fur’
    • ‘I could live without the fine veneer of cat fur on my clothes too.’
    • ‘Month-old ringtails look like miniature adults: the same black and white clown make-up and soft grey fur.’
    • ‘The females in particular were sought after for their fine, soft fur.’
    • ‘He was an orange tabby cat, with sleek fur, pointy ears, and a pink nose.’
    • ‘While it lacks the glamour factor of soft sensuous fur, a shearling's ability to keep out the cold is indisputable.’
    • ‘Her hair was like a rabbits' fur, soft and delicate, though at the same time it was thick.’
    • ‘They were fairly small with short, jet black fur, acid-green eyes and pointy little ears.’
    • ‘They have short fur on the front of the ears and long hairs on the back to increase their hearing capabilities.’
    • ‘Even when fur has no commercial value, trappers are sent to work, in some cases at taxpayer expense.’
    • ‘Most significantly, the animal's fur and soft tissue are also fossilized.’
    • ‘The long, soft, fine fur that covers their bodies is generally gray to brown in color.’
    • ‘‘Just thinking of something,’ she sighed and ran her fingers over her cat's soft fur.’
    • ‘The mice actually have yellow fur rather than red hair.’
    • ‘Its fur was soft and fine as she gave it a gentle pat on the head.’
    • ‘I was half covered in soft fur of an animal of some kind.’
    • ‘Underneath there, it's very, very soft fur underneath the porcupine.’
    • ‘In some coats the sheepskin is treated to look like fine fur, which makes bold statements in men's bomber and full-length styles.’
    • ‘Arian was already ready for school and had carefully brushed Royal's soft coat of short black and brown fur.’
    • ‘Lauren groomed Samoa's soft fur gently, and the cat purred loudly.’
    • ‘Camel hair is from the extremely soft and fine fur from the undercoat of the camel.’
    hair, wool
    coat, mane, fleece, pelt
    pelage
    fell
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1The skin of an animal with fur on it.
      • ‘Parties of Creeks regularly journeyed from Georgia and Alabama to exchange skins and furs at Pensacola; many Creek women had married traders.’
      • ‘While it is widely acceptable to object to eating flesh, wearing skins and furs, and sport-hunting of non-human animals, the objection to vivisection is relatively muted in comparison.’
      • ‘In North America Europeans conducted a huge trade in furs and skins through native peoples and enlisted them as allies in their wars.’
      • ‘Longclaw uses one as an extension for his mast, and adds skins and furs to his sail as the temperature permits.’
      • ‘He has heard rumors of gold, and he has come with furs and leather to trade.’
      • ‘He wore white robes and around his feet and shins were bound grey and white animal hides and furs.’
      • ‘My mother did beadwork, tanned all the skins, sewed furs, made soap, smoked meat.’
      • ‘He trapped foxes for extra money and sold their furs all around.’
      • ‘Spanish lieutenant governors, palms well greased, usually winked at contraband trade, and furs, skins, and trade goods would flow across borders with relative ease.’
      • ‘Harriet led her to a pile of soft cloths on the ground, a velvety mound of skins and furs heaped haphazardly in a corner.’
      • ‘The BBC reported in July that there is a flourishing trade in the furs of endangered animals in Afghanistan.’
      • ‘During the summers, some families live in tents made from furs or skins.’
      • ‘Each faction was allocated specific furs and skins to distinguish them from their enemies’
      • ‘That's why, for much of history, furs and skins from the more aggressive carnivores have been an essential part of the ceremonial dress of kings, emperors and dictators.’
      • ‘By comparison, Canada harvests the furs of about 1 million wild animals each year, from a land mass three times as large.’
      • ‘There were stalls and stalls of furs and animal hide.’
      • ‘The animals used for this trade are raised under deplorable conditions and killed solely for their skins and furs.’
      • ‘They were comfortable in the warm southern sunshine, but felt strange to one who had worn nothing but animal skins and furs all his life.’
      • ‘There wasn't a blank spot anywhere, beautiful carpets covered most of the floor and there were paintings and animal furs on the walls.’
      • ‘Only a few generations ago many of them survived entirely off the land, following the caribou from fall to springtime and usually reuniting in the summers to collect their Treaty money and sell their furs.’
    2. 1.2Skins with fur on them, or fabrics resembling these, used as material for making, trimming, or lining clothes.
      ‘jackets made out of yak fur’
      [as modifier] ‘a fur coat’
      • ‘Mom came home wearing her 3/4 length royal blue sheared beaver faux fur coat and her high heel black boots.’
      • ‘The activists targeted Hartley's fashion store because of a small number of garments featuring rabbit fur collars.’
      • ‘Even a pair of jeans looks formal when you wear fur vests.’
      • ‘In winter, Moscow is a cold, bleak place that gives rise to the almost national costume of fur coat and hat and sturdy boots.’
      • ‘Shoes are low stilettos and mink fur neck wraps feature unnecessarily.’
      • ‘Large covered hooks and eyes are commonly used for fur garment closures.’
      • ‘He was also wearing a coat with fur trim on the hood and a beret which had a badge on the front.’
      • ‘Evidently, fur is the hot thing for men to be wearing - fur coats, fur vests, fur sombreros.’
      • ‘She is all bundled up in her fur coat, hat, gloves and scarf.’
      • ‘Snow lightly fell on the ground as people bustled back and forth in their large fur coats and hats.’
      • ‘Noteworthy numbers were the knitted fur cardigans and the silver foil fur-lined jackets.’
      • ‘Leather and/or fur hats can look great on older men who want to keep warm while maintaining their refined, polished look.’
      • ‘And I'd look really stupid in that purple fedora and fur coat, by the way.’
      • ‘Winter clothes were laden with fur trimming of the brightest colours.’
      • ‘The principal headdress for men is a high, stiff felt hat or fur cap with earflaps, the latter of which is worn during the winter months.’
      • ‘The ill-dressed children wore thin uniforms and light coats, without the felt boots and fur hats that the Russians wore.’
      • ‘People in towns and cities tend to wear modern clothes made of manufactured cloth, perhaps with fur coats and hats in winter.’
      • ‘Traditionally, North America, Western Europe, the Nordic countries and Russia have been the major markets for fur garments.’
      • ‘Models sashayed the catwalk in their jeans, textural cable knit sweaters and big fur bags.’
      • ‘Chiffon tunics and ruched leggings combined with fur cowls and bronze high heels for a modern-rustic effect.’
    3. 1.3A garment made of, trimmed, or lined with fur.
      ‘she pulled the fur around her’
      • ‘He towers over the other actors, looking outrageous in a floor-length fur or terrifying in his camouflage pants and bomber jacket.’
      • ‘His tour operator has asked anyone wearing a fur to report to the police station as it has probably been stolen.’
      • ‘Standing, she shed the furs and pulled her cloak tightly around herself.’
      • ‘It is the luxury of wearing a beautiful fur that was bought by someone else's grandmother long before it was a sin to kill animals for fashion.’
      • ‘While we're going about our daily lives in down parkas, furs and boots, the designers are busy creating and proudly presenting what we can expect in spring and summer.’
      • ‘These women were traveling, they had relationships, they had jewels, they had furs.’
      • ‘I was not in love with his use of furs in this collection.’
      • ‘She is a vision of sweeping strides and soft steps swathed in airy veils and supple furs.’
      • ‘He intended to store winter garments and furs for people for a fee.’
      • ‘Now with both earrings in place and wearing a long fur, Mrs. Treacher was saying goodnight to her daughter and telling her son to be good.’
      • ‘Now, you know as well as I do, that you rarely see anyone under fifty-ish or even with vaguely liberal views wearing a fur nowadays.’
      • ‘The designer even managed to transfer a brocade lattice motif over the curvaceous sheepskin jacket coupled with fluttering silk skirt, and dyed all his furs in flashy tones of blue, pink and purple.’
      • ‘He used vivid shocking pink dyed furs atop huge enveloping coats.’
      • ‘They didn't stay out on deck for very long; despite their heavy furs and layers of garments, the two women were soon chilled to the bone and juddering.’
      • ‘A tall, striking man given to wearing capes, furs and abundant jewellery, he delighted in toying with his own identity, playing up contradictions - was he British or American?’
      • ‘She was dressed in a luxurious fur, and her nose and cheeks were pink with the cold.’
      • ‘He depicts emerging class divisions - the wealthy in top hat and furs, along with the newcomers ignored by the black middle class.’
      • ‘The man across the table wearing a fur and had very long nails on his pinkies.’
      • ‘Walk in, and you'll find everything from funky furs to elegant dress coats.’
      • ‘Even the furs, feathers and jewellery received the first-class treatment.’
    4. 1.4Heraldry
      Any of several heraldic tinctures representing animal skins in stylized form (e.g., ermine, vair)
  • 2British A coating formed by hard water on the inside surface of a pipe, kettle, or other container.

    • ‘It, together with calcium carbonate, or the chalk of limestone deposits, is what makes water ‘hard’ and furs up the kettle.’
    limescale
    View synonyms
    1. 2.1A coating formed on the tongue as a symptom of sickness.
      • ‘When the functions of an internal organ are disrupted, the symptoms can be discerned in the complexion, eyes, color, voice and texture of the tongue fur.’
      • ‘Just had a bit of breakfast and I'm now trying to get the fur off my tongue while writing this.’

verb

[WITH OBJECT]
  • 1Covered with or made from a particular type of fur.

    ‘silky-furred lemurs’
    • ‘The curtain in the house's front window opened a slit and anyone watching would've seen a tiny furred paw and then a pink nose.’
    • ‘The orange furred feline paced uncertain on the spot before heading over to her two linked friends and seating herself comfortably beside them, watching them eat.’
    • ‘There was a porcelain toilet with a yellow furred seat coverer, and yellow tinted plastic drapes for the shower.’
    • ‘If anything, their populations are growing - to the point where city hall wants Montrealers to be a little less friendly with their furred and feathered friends.’
    • ‘Also, they're the only deer species with fully furred noses.’
    • ‘The golden furred cat stretched out it's body, tail swishing as it smoothly padded over to the door.’
    • ‘Bilbies, or rabbit eared bandicoots, are attractive little marsupials with long rabbit-like ears and beautiful silky blue-grey fur and long well furred tails.’
    • ‘The cold and snow had no effect on the people in the streets, who turned their surroundings into a mass of furred and gloved figures.’
    • ‘Fortunately, they were of the furred and feathered kind.’
    • ‘The powerful tail is also fully furred, and is shorter in sea otters than other otter species.’
    • ‘Then she dipped one shoulder and slid that magnificent furred cloak off, thrusting it towards him.’
    • ‘The door creaked open and a furred snout poked out.’
    • ‘What we see in their clothes is the waist-cinch: her red seamy bodice, his jacket, furred collars and cuffs.’
    • ‘You are invited to come along to this special event and to bring your furred, feathered or scaly friends.’
    • ‘It's a griffin, definitely, with a hooked, grey beak like an eagle, a sleek, furred head and the unmistakable outline of wings behind it, all purple.’
    • ‘These are unique among mammals, consisting of bony cores covered by furred skin.’
    • ‘A branch creaks; a silent shadow skims the ground, and another few pecans vanish into the furred cheek of a squirrel.’
    • ‘She claims the incident took place in the parade ring as runners, including furred and feathered competitors of all descriptions, prepared themselves for the big race.’
    • ‘The menu still refers, quaintly, to feathered and furred game, mostly brought down from the restaurant's own game estate in the high Pennines.’
    • ‘Flying squirrels have a furred membrane extending between the wrist and ankle that allows them to glide between trees.’
  • 2British Coat or clog with a deposit.

    ‘the stuff that furs up coronary arteries’
    • ‘On this fork is something that will taste delicious, but it might bring you out in spots, put weight on your hips, fur your arteries, endanger your guts.’
    • ‘The game around Barnsley was known as Potty Knocking or just Knurr as the Knurr is a ceramic sphere about 15 mm in diameter commonly used in the kettles of the pre-war era to stop limescale furring it up.’
    • ‘All that cheese though - virtually furring up the arteries even as you consume it.’
    • ‘Most angina is due to disease of the coronary arteries that results when the arteries fur up with fatty deposits.’
    • ‘When these arteries fur up with fatty cholesterol deposits, the heart muscle doesn't receive enough blood to work properly.’
    • ‘Almonds are full of naturally occurring antioxidants that have the ability to prevent cholesterol furring up arteries.’
    • ‘It is a dietary mantra that has bordered on the fanatic: fat is a killer and a clogger and it furs your arteries, bursts your blood vessels, and sends your weight soaring through the stratosphere.’
    • ‘However, in my view they may protect your arteries from furring up - but there is no scientific evidence for the claim they can increase your libido.’
    • ‘‘What many people do not realise arteries fur of the arteries starts early in childhood, so paying attention to your diet, and that of your children, is crucial,’ he said.’
    • ‘It gets in your eyes and furs your tongue, but it's not like gas.’
    • ‘Yorktest hopes to profit from growing awareness of homocysteine - a sulphurous amino acid, which is thought to weaken blood vessels and prepare the way for the furring up caused by some kinds of cholesterol.’
    • ‘Along with obvious risks of heart disease like smoking or being overweight is the danger posed by cholesterol. It is the fatty substance produced in the liver furs up coronary arteries.’
    • ‘The substantial plate of rabbit was beautifully tender and came with the sort of gloriously rich sauce that you can feel furring up your arteries as you eat.’
    • ‘For now, it is safest to say that the combination of high fat and high sugar is a deadly one for furring up the arteries.’
    • ‘Then our season is over, and I can retreat into a world of apathy, occasional delight at victories over lesser teams and my arteries can begin to fur up at a lesser rate.’
  • 3Fix strips of wood to (floor joists, wall studs, etc.) in order to level them or increase their depth.

    • ‘The insertion of a separate air barrier may add additional cost but can be accomplished with relative ease with masonry cavity or veneer walls or walls containing an interior finish, such as furred drywall.’
    • ‘We also like the fact that gypsum board area separation walls accommodate electrical and plumbing systems and we don't need to frame or fur.’
    • ‘You can accomplish both those tasks by furring the floor up using lumber and plywood.’
    • ‘If headroom is more limited, furring down the ceiling and then covering it with a finished material is a possible solution.’

Phrases

  • fur and feather

    • Game mammals and birds.

      • ‘There will also be one of the biggest fur and feather sections in the county, and the farmer's market is returning by popular demand.’
      • ‘The fur and feather trade has caused some species to become extinct and pushed others to the brink.’
      • ‘New EU regulations have banned such displays because, it alleged, mixing fur and feather with meat is a health hazard.’
      • ‘They ranged from breeding, grooming and animal husbandry in horses, ponies, beef cattle, sheep and pigs down to the smallest in the fur and feather section of rabbits, pigeons and fowl.’
      • ‘There had just been the pro-pigeon demos outside the Town Hall, you see, and the councillors were terrified of upsetting the fur and feather lovers.’
      • ‘‘If you are in London you perceive Scotland as a recreational land, a land of fin, fur and feather,’ he says.’
  • make the fur fly

    • informal Cause serious, perhaps violent, trouble.

      • ‘When America's most powerful female political commentator notes that female submissiveness is the new sexy, then inevitably the fur will fly.’
      • ‘An arched tail with the fur fluffed means ‘this is my territory - hang around and the fur will fly!’’
      • ‘No formal action has yet been taken, but if the case goes to court, friends predict, the fur will fly.’
      • ‘She expects that the fur will fly (but only figuratively, for sure) at Princeton, and right away she offers her view on one subject on the agenda.’
      • ‘As I said, we're normally quite conciliatory… but back us into a corner and the fur will fly.’

Origin

Middle English (as a verb): from Old French forrer to line, sheathe from forre sheath of Germanic origin.

Pronunciation:

fur

/fər/