Definition of fun in English:

fun

noun

  • 1Enjoyment, amusement, or lighthearted pleasure.

    ‘the children were having fun in the play area’
    ‘anyone who turns up can join in the fun’
    • ‘He had his own fun, having fun, dancing, reggae, all that, on the beach and all that.’
    • ‘I vaguely remember playing soccer and having fun with my old friends.’
    • ‘They feel bad because the culture suggests everybody's having fun, and if you're not there's something the matter with you.’
    • ‘Are you planning and resting and having fun or concentrating on 2001's season?’
    • ‘Rather, we just need a venue to get together to show that we are just as much into having fun as we are into pursuing our academic ventures.’
    • ‘However, even a single inexhaustible form of unproblematic fun is enough to avoid the problems above.’
    • ‘Maybe that's a function of getting older - you reach a point where you realise you're just not having fun anymore, and so you leave.’
    • ‘‘The emphasis this year will be on fancy dress and having fun as opposed to winning,’ said Tim.’
    • ‘Calling all children who are interested in dancing and having fun.’
    • ‘These guys are having fun doing what they are doing and it shows.’
    • ‘As a friend noted at work, you can just tell he's having fun when he plays.’
    • ‘Someone in the database has been having fun and this fun will shortly come to an end.’
    • ‘Maybe they are a little bit distracted from having fun and skating with their friends.’
    • ‘The artists will paint a design based on the theme of having fun.’
    • ‘Having fun is the best way to banish the blahs and reap physical benefits.’
    • ‘Play with your baby - this shows you like spending time together having fun.’
    • ‘But now we have to do reinterviews of people that are having fun getting in the spotlight.’
    • ‘Kerry leans his head back and laughs heartily, because he's having fun, you know?’
    • ‘I spent far too much time and money, fitting it, having fun, relaxing.’
    • ‘It really didn't take that long for me to realise that I was having fun, for the first time in ages I was enjoying myself.’
    pleasure, entertainment, enjoyment, amusement, excitement, gratification
    merriment, cheerfulness, cheeriness, cheer, joy, jollity, joviality, jocularity, high spirits, gaiety, mirth, mirthfulness, laughter, hilarity, glee, gladness, light-heartedness, levity
    View synonyms
    1. 1.1 A source of this.
      ‘people watching is great fun’
      • ‘Its quick rise in appeal and purpose is attributed to both fashion and fun.’
      • ‘Ticket sales have been going very well for what will be a great night of fun and fashion.’
      • ‘The almost-familiar music is great fun and the major source of delight in this show.’
      • ‘Gone too will be spoiled votes, which are often a source of fun for those scanning the voting sheets.’
      • ‘Although these toys may be a good source of fun for youngsters, on the long term they will only do harm.’
      • ‘Apart from getting a preview of things to come, Fashion Week offers endless fun in the form of people-watching.’
      • ‘They are a cause of pride to people living in rural areas, and a source of entertainment, fun and education to those who visit from towns and cities.’
      • ‘I had so much fun on Open Source last night and discovered that there are quite a few truck drivers who are birders.’
      • ‘Before you can even play the disc a screen pops up with some enhanced fun.’
      • ‘The November wind was chilly, but I didn't think that it was too cold to have some good old fashioned fun.’
      • ‘These models freely gave of their time to add spectacle to the style, cheeky charm to the chic and full-on fun to the fashion.’
      • ‘Village carnivals are a source for both fun and community pride.’
      • ‘Those who engage in vandalism in most cases do so as a source of fun for themselves and their friends.’
      • ‘Simply because he seems to be having so much fun, Michael Rudder stands out in an able cast of seven.’
      • ‘To them the pipe lagging was a plaything, a source of fun.’
      • ‘Coupled with learning, fun, jive and jest, to enhance one's personality one must get a good campus life.’
      • ‘Fashion, fripperies and fun seemed to be consuming the nation.’
      • ‘While most of the seniors maintained a serious countenance, these kids had fun.’
      • ‘There's some mild postmodern fun to be had identifying these sources, but that's hardly the point.’
      • ‘He had managed to befriend them all in Sadie's service, and proved to be an excellent source of fun.’
      ridicule, derision, mockery, laughter, scorn, scoffing, contempt
      View synonyms
    2. 1.2 Playful behavior or good humor.
      ‘she's full of fun’
      • ‘You could call Kim effervescent and tremendous fun in her naked patriotism, or you could call her very irritating.’
      • ‘She's 82 and as full of fun and mischief as ever, over the phone - even though she's hardly able to walk these days.’
      • ‘Honey is a young golden mixed breed terrier, who likes cats, and is full of fun and playful.’
      • ‘He had the most amazing bright eyes, full of laughter and fun.’
      • ‘She was always full of fun and trusted everyone she met.’
      • ‘Rees was an excellent listener and a thoughtful adviser and he had a great sense of humour and of fun.’
      • ‘From the student perspective she was seen as the warmest of people, very popular with her peers and full of fun.’
      • ‘These people were friendly, courteous to excess, and full of fun.’
      • ‘Intelligent and obedient, this breed also has a character full of fun.’
      • ‘She enjoyed entertaining and her home was always full of fun and laughter.’
      • ‘Weekends are full of creative fun for kids of all ages at the Horniman Museum.’
      • ‘It is an example of Marshall's style of filmmaking, characterised by its good humour and buoyant sense of fun.’
      • ‘I love to see them roll over and over on their backs, race up and down the hills making snorting, happy noises, most obviously full of glee and fun.’
      • ‘While under water themselves, the pair had some memorable fun with a playful beluga whale.’
      • ‘The film looks fresh and trips the light fantastic, it's fun, breezy and full of laughs.’
      • ‘Gold jewellery worn in layers best conveys the mood of fun, playfulness and stylish chaos.’
      • ‘This is fabulous stuff, evocative and ethereal while also being playful and fun.’
      • ‘I like that Jon Stewart's guests seem to have a good sense of humour, and have fun with the show and the host.’
      • ‘She had the rare ability to give her best and encourage the best in others while maintaining a sense of flair, humour and fun.’
      • ‘These mini-features are chock full of fun, interesting trivia, and are not to be skipped.’
    3. 1.3 Behavior or an activity that is intended purely for amusement and should not be interpreted as having serious or malicious purposes.
      ‘it was nothing serious; they just enjoyed having some harmless fun’
      • ‘‘It's just a bit of fun and it seemed ideal timing with Father's Day coming up,’ he said.’
      • ‘It's just a bit of fun to let the kids have a good time and raise some money for the charity.’
      • ‘It was a week of good fun rather than serious education.’
      • ‘I've always followed fashion and would love to be a model, but it's all just a bit of fun really.’
      • ‘As part of the weekend of fun, activities ranging from robot wars to model car races were held at the Rec.’
      • ‘It is just a bit of fun for charity and hopefully it will raise a lot of money for the relief fund.’
      • ‘Most of them came there just to have fun while others were serious about winning.’
      • ‘It goes without saying that financial astrology is just a bit of fun.’
      • ‘Combine activity and fun by going for a hike or a bike ride together as a family.’
      • ‘This exercise was, you will understand, just a bit of fun.’
      • ‘A day care area was also set up for babies and toddlers, which gave their parents a chance to have fun with some activities as well.’
      • ‘Music and dance on the tarmac, bouncing castle and other fun activities and lots of fun.’
      • ‘At first it was just for exercise, just a bit of fun - she didn't want to punish herself - but gradually she wanted more and more.’
      • ‘Despite the inclement weather all the participants went away happy after their four days of activity and fun.’
      • ‘Even when I started out in music, I just intended to have fun - I didn't have a career plan.’
      • ‘There will be plenty of fun, food and activities for everyone to enjoy.’
      • ‘When life has no higher purpose, entertainment and fun become the over-riding goal in life.’
      • ‘I am not looking for marriage, just a bit of fun and attention.’
      • ‘Kim, meanwhile, tells Tasha that he sees the relationship as a bit of fun; nothing serious.’
      • ‘The camp is back with all the usual mix of fun, activities and medical treatment as in previous years.’
    4. 1.4[attributive] (of a place or event) providing entertainment or leisure activities for children.
      ‘a 33-acre movie-themed fun park’
      • ‘The night includes plenty of fun events with raffles, refreshments and lots of social chat.’
      • ‘I always think of it as being a bit like Never Never Land - it's a fun place and we were encouraged to try things.’
      • ‘It will be a fun event for everyone with the Gateway organising a gala picnic for children.’
      • ‘There will be fun events for all the family in addition to races and these will be open to all.’
      • ‘Parks should be fun places to go but I'm always paranoid when taking children there.’
      • ‘The water and beach events, guided walks, exhibits of marine heritage and fun events were a hit.’

adjective

informal
  • Amusing, entertaining, or enjoyable.

    ‘it was a fun evening’
    • ‘A fun evening this, finishing off an altogether worthwhile and enjoyable season on a pleasant note.’
    • ‘There are other interesting and fun ideas; a few new ways of thinking.’
    • ‘I sucked it up, however, complimented her on her gown, and wished her and her friends a fun evening.’
    • ‘Which is sad, because this guy makes some of the most interesting and fun music in Wellington, or even New Zealand.’
    • ‘It has been years since my mother has seen me perform, so it will be a fun evening.’
    • ‘She was nearly always a subject of Dylan's flirting and knew it was fun and enjoyable.’
    • ‘But all in all, paying took about half an hour which was a tedious, tiresome end to what was otherwise a fun evening.’
    • ‘Rather than being victim to this silly debate, we should move forward and embrace this interesting and fun addition to sex.’
    • ‘I hope people voted for the Greens, because as a bunch they are actually fun and interesting people.’
    • ‘If we are fortunate, we work in professions that are fun and enjoyable as well as productive.’
    • ‘Here are several interesting, unique and fun outfits and styles that you might want to try out.’
    • ‘For ten years, Gary Martin has made some of the most interesting and fun dance music around.’
    • ‘Once the crust has set up, the least amount of fresh powder will give you equally enjoyable and fun conditions.’
    • ‘A ploughman's lunch was provided and the cooler weather contributed to a very enjoyable fun day.’
    • ‘The evening proceeded with a fun quiz and was followed by a musical quiz.’
    • ‘I still enjoy it a lot and it makes my life a lot more fun and enjoyable.’
    • ‘However, on landing all was well and the group set out for Athy having had an enjoyable, interesting and fun weekend.’
    • ‘The bustle and madness of the day slowly faded into the exchange of fun memories towards the evening.’
    • ‘Yes, it was a thoroughly enjoyable and fun night and real stars did in fact emerge.’
    • ‘Worlds where animals talk and live like humans have always been fun and interesting, and Band of Thieves is no different.’
    enjoyable, amusing, diverting, pleasurable, pleasing, agreeable, interesting
    entertaining, lively, amusing, fun-loving, witty, convivial, clubbable
    View synonyms

verb

North American
informal
  • Joke or tease.

    [no object] ‘no need to get sore—I was only funning’
    [with object] ‘they are just funning you’
    make fun of, poke fun at, chaff, make jokes about, rag, mock, laugh at, guy, satirize, be sarcastic about
    View synonyms

Usage

The use of fun as an adjective meaning ‘enjoyable,’ as in we had a fun evening, is now established in informal use, although not accepted in standard English. The comparative and superlative forms funner and funnest, formed as if fun were a standard adjective, should only be used in very informal contexts, typically speech

Phrases

  • for fun

    • In order to amuse oneself and not for any more serious purpose.

      • ‘This bug took him to Bosnia, where a local film crew playfully scooped up live mines and waved them around for fun.’
      • ‘But tonight, just for the fun of it, Des and I are going up to Wembley to see if we can get tickets for about 20 quid.’
      • ‘With few responsibilities and fewer cares, we were free to participate in activities just for the fun of it.’
      • ‘I also see sport as being fun, and let's face it, the only reason that most people do sports is for fun.’
      • ‘While many of us play tennis just for the fun of it, we also are challenged by the idea of how it might fit into a total health and wellness strategy.’
      • ‘Since he has recently, himself, acquired a garden shed I will be interested to see if it accumulates some Palladian detailing for the fun of it.’
      • ‘It was more for fun and people didn't take it seriously enough, so it didn't really work.’
      • ‘Hundreds of people, young and old, have taken up the opportunity to learn new skills, enjoy a hobby or just try out something new for the fun of it.’
      • ‘Some 40 million people said they were surfing for fun on a typical day during the month.’
      • ‘Actually I wrote this story for fun and it's not really meant to be serious.’
  • fun and games

    • Amusing and enjoyable activities.

      ‘teaching isn't all fun and games’
      • ‘It is being staged by Razzamatazz Entertainers and will be jam-packed with fun and games for the primary school children of the town.’
      • ‘Although the top game makers are reaping profits, China is not all fun and games.’
      • ‘This has proven to be a very enjoyable night of fun and games, if interested please come along on the night.’
      • ‘So why not bring the family along for some end of summer fun and games before the youngsters make the return to school next week?’
      • ‘After dispelling their initial fears, they will find that life won't be too tough for them with the programme focusing on fun and games.’
      • ‘For the Chinese in game-playing factories like these, though, it is not all fun and games.’
      • ‘The palace is keeping up the tradition of Tudor times when people would take to the frozen River Thames for festive fun and games.’
      • ‘Each session will incorporate fun and games for each age to enjoy.’
      • ‘There was plenty of fun and games for all with all the usual Halloween games as well as a disco to keep everyone occupied.’
      • ‘This is currently running and will finish up on Friday next 23rd July after five hectic days of fun and games for all.’
      cavorting, clowning about, clowning around, fooling around, horseplay, play, playfulness, tomfoolery, buffoonery, mischief
      revels, frolics, revelry, larks, antics, high jinks
      skylarking
      View synonyms
  • someone's idea of fun

    • Used to emphasize one's dislike for an activity or to mock someone else's liking for it.

      ‘being stuck behind a desk all day isn't my idea of fun’
      • ‘I can see the appeal perhaps when you've had a couple of glasses of wine or beer, but waking up on a Saturday morning just to sing does not seem like my idea of fun.’
      • ‘If spending two weeks wedged into a hammock isn't your idea of fun, the club provides a similarly impressive menu of activities.’
      • ‘Perhaps being around Uncle John and Cousin Tommy isn't exactly your idea of fun; it doesn't mean the holidays will be miserable.’
      • ‘This isn't a particularly interesting place to be unless hotels and office blocks are your idea of fun, but Granville and Robson Streets have an entertaining collection of restaurants, bars, cinemas and theatres.’
      • ‘Or if oversized rodents and flying elephants are more your idea of fun, you could always drive to the magical world of Eurodisney - a sure fire way of keeping the kids happy whatever the weather.’
      • ‘Even though I thankfully live quite close to the airport, it still means getting out of bed around 4am, which is not my idea of fun.’
      • ‘It was all extremely glamorous, if not exactly a teenager 's idea of fun.’
      • ‘Stuck in Edinburgh Airport is not my idea of fun.’
      • ‘Nothing against those who like it; just not my idea of fun.’
      • ‘But Jon Geldart 's idea of fun would terrify men half his age - and he will be spending his 48th birthday pushing a sledge in pitch darkness towards the North Pole.’
  • in fun

    • Not intended seriously; as a joke.

      ‘remember when you meet the press to say that your speech was all in fun’
      • ‘The pair of them normally sat close together to taunt or tease one another in fun, but neither of them even looked the other's way.’
      • ‘They weren't arguing seriously, it was all in fun.’
      • ‘I heard it was said in fun and jest, but until I talk to him, I really don't know.’
      • ‘Most people shrugged - all in fun anyway, right?’
      • ‘There were some fire extinguishers, there was a séance, there was some table-drumming, but it was all in fun.’
      • ‘The first five were friends from school teasing him in fun or scorning him with contempt.’
      • ‘Of course it was all in fun and another parish ceremony to celebrate the new millennium and the coming of Christianity.’
      • ‘Yes the ‘north/south jokes’ are always in evidence but it is mostly in fun and on the odd occasion it isn't who cares?’
      • ‘Sure it's a bit corny and the plots are thin as well worn blue jeans, but it's all in fun, and the visitors seem to take it that way.’
      • ‘It's a joke and all in fun, but the teasing used to hurt me.’
      playful, in jest, joking, jokey, as a joke, tongue in cheek, light-hearted, high-spirited, unserious, facetious, flippant, flip, glib, frivolous, for a laugh
      to tease, teasing, bantering, whimsical
      frolicsome, sportive
      jocose
      View synonyms
  • like fun

    • dated An ironic exclamation of contradiction or disbelief in response to a statement.

  • make fun of

    • Tease, laugh at, or joke about (someone) in a mocking or unkind way.

      • ‘We can no longer laugh or make fun of each other because of our differences; it is a sure sign of our ignorance.’
      • ‘But in no way does the joke make fun of the disaster or the people killed.’
      • ‘Today there are people who use his name as a joke and make fun of the way he looks.’
      • ‘I mean, he made fun of them, he mocked them if they lost the tennis match or the swimming meet.’
      • ‘Ethnic minority doctors reported being ridiculed or made fun of when they spoke in public or semi-public meetings.’
      • ‘Where could she go where she wasn't going to be ridiculed, made fun of, or treated like dirt?’
      • ‘He slouches in his chair, he laughs at his own jokes, he makes fun of himself, he kids around with his subordinates.’
      • ‘Of course some audience members want to be picked out and made fun of, as they purposely dress up for the part.’
      • ‘He was the kind of boy Kirsten, Dana and I would have laughed about and made fun of at school.’
      • ‘I was so exhausted from putting on a smile when I was made fun of and scoffed at by a majority of the class.’
      taunt, poke fun at, chaff, tease, make jokes about, ridicule, mock, laugh at, guy, mimic, parody, caricature, lampoon, satirize, rag, quiz, be sarcastic about, deride, scoff at, jeer at, jibe at
      take the mickey out of, send up, rib, josh, wind up, pull someone's leg, make a monkey of
      goof on, rag on, pull someone's chain, razz
      poke mullock at, sling off at
      rot, twit
      make sport of
      smoke, rally
      View synonyms
  • not much (or a lot of) fun

    • Used to indicate that something strikes one as extremely unpleasant and depressing.

      ‘it can't be much fun living next door to him’
      • ‘‘It's not much fun to play bad golf, and I've done that before,’ Toms reflected.’
      • ‘MacDonald said wearing the suits was not much fun.’
      • ‘It's not much fun when it's like that… dancing with lots of sweaty men… at least it wasn't too crowded.’
      • ‘I went to the odd strip club in my younger days and found them seedy and not much fun.’
      • ‘Bloom was obviously just not much fun at parties.’
      • ‘Top speed is an arthritic 62 mph, and although that still seems pretty nippy on a bike, it's not much fun for anything other than inner-city commuting.’
      • ‘I've been in hospital in the holiday period myself and it is not much fun.’
      • ‘They're not much fun on Karaoke nights, but believe me; it's worth it!’
      • ‘But walking down the Strip and downtown in daytime during summer is not much fun as the temperature can easily reach over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.’
      • ‘The breakdown of a relationship is not much fun, but becoming single again can really set you free.’
  • what fun!

    • Used to convey that an activity or situation sounds amusing or enjoyable.

      • ‘Then she clapped her hands together in delight and said, ‘Oh, what fun!’’

Origin

Late 17th century (denoting a trick or hoax): from obsolete fun to cheat or hoax dialect variant of late Middle English fon make a fool of, be a fool related to fon a fool of unknown origin. Compare with fond.

Pronunciation:

fun

/fən/